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AOC Q32V3 32'' VA QHD 75 Hz Monitor, 103% sRGB @ $210 + F/S

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LINK: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B086WBLJ6M/

SPEC:
  • 31.5" 2560x1440 VA Panel
  • 75 Hz Refresh Rate, 5 ms GTG Response
  • 250 nits Brightness
  • 1x HDMI 1.4, 1x DisplayPort 1.2
  • NTSC 80%, sRGB 103%, DCI-P3 73%
  • 100x100 mm VESA Support
  • 6.79 kg
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Created 09-07-2020 at 04:34 AM by Suryasis
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#2
It's got all the specs for a good gaming monitor.
Priced fairly well. 32 inch might be big on a desk though.
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#3
Stats are a bit dubious. 103% sRGB coverage at 250cd/m2?

That said, this is good for all purpose use at a great price. Wouldn't trust it for graphics design.
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#4
Might as well spend another 40 usd to pick up the 144hz version at 27 inches. 32in at QHD is same ppi as 24in FHD for those who don't mind and want larger screen.
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#5
Quote from dq2014
:
Stats are a bit dubious. 103% sRGB coverage at 250cd/m2?

That said, this is good for all purpose use at a great price. Wouldn't trust it for graphics design.
What brightness has to with the color gamut coverage of a monitor? 250 nits is fine for Indoor usage where you will be using it. Also, it does not support any kind of HDR function for whch extra brightness can help.
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#6
Quote from Suryasis
:
What brightness has to with the color gamut coverage of a monitor? 250 nits is fine for Indoor usage where you will be using it. Also, it does not support any kind of HDR function for whch extra brightness can help.
It's harder to differentiate the difference in shades of color at lower brightness. You can experiment with your phone, turn brightness all the way down and all images look a little dull and washed out regardless of how the image is mastered.

250 is fine for most uses. Maybe I'm getting old but I do notice less straining of eyes at slightly higher brightness if youre reading small texts all days. After I have a 350cd/m2 display and I turn the brightness down to 80% (~300cd/m2) and thats a sweet spot for me. although not HDR certified I do notice finer gradients of color at higher brigthness. Contrast is really important in HDR too.

There are many other variables that cause eye strain and everyone is sensitive to different things. Flickerless, blue filter, and high refresh rates are some of the examples.

Everybody is different and the best way to figure what people like is to try different monitors themselves at bug box stores
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Last edited by dq2014 September 7, 2020 at 02:24 PM.
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#7
Quote from JerseyJay19
:
It's got all the specs for a good gaming monitor.
Priced fairly well. 32 inch might be big on a desk though.
Nope, 32" is fine. I use a 32" for programming and it's good for me. I don't think I would go larger.
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Last edited by OlivePenguin524 September 7, 2020 at 04:53 PM.
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#8
Seems like a good deal, repped. I got the 27" AOC deal a bit ago, or I would get this.
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#9
Quote from dq2014
:
It's harder to differentiate the difference in shades of color at lower brightness. You can experiment with your phone, turn brightness all the way down and all images look a little dull and washed out regardless of how the image is mastered.

250 is fine for most uses. Maybe I'm getting old but I do notice less straining of eyes at slightly higher brightness if youre reading small texts all days. After I have a 350cd/m2 display and I turn the brightness down to 80% (~300cd/m2) and thats a sweet spot for me. although not HDR certified I do notice finer gradients of color at higher brigthness. Contrast is really important in HDR too.

There are many other variables that cause eye strain and everyone is sensitive to different things. Flickerless, blue filter, and high refresh rates are some of the examples.

Everybody is different and the best way to figure what people like is to try different monitors themselves at bug box stores
I disagree. Many sources that discuss creative color work recommend a lower brightness setting for improved results. The idea is that if you edit with a too-bright monitor your results may look dark on other people's screens. In addition, the color calibration hardware I have worked with typically instructs to lower monitor brightness to fall within a certain range. I'm not sure why this is so, but it may be related to perceived brightness when editing.

That said, if you like higher brightness for text or editing work, that's a preference, do what works for you.
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Last edited by antechnet September 7, 2020 at 05:09 PM.
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#10
this or the acer one? $70 less on that one though.
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#11
Is this 75 hz and freesync?
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#12
Quote from yourr8
:
this or the acer one? $70 less on that one though.
I'm assuming you mean this one?

You mentioned the difference in price, but you didn't mention:
Different resolution (1080P)
Different Refresh rate (60Hz)
Different Panel type (IPS)
etc...

About the only thing that's similar is the size. Choose the one that more closely meets your personal criteria, as they are otherwise not really comparable in an apples-to-apples situation.

FYI, most people consider a 32" 1080p monitor to be too low of a resolution for the size. 24" tends to be people's most common cut-off point for 1080p. Anything bigger, and you can see the pixels too easily.
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#13
Quote from antechnet
:
I disagree. Many sources that discuss creative color work recommend a lower brightness setting for improved results. The idea is that if you edit with a too-bright monitor your results may look dark on other people's screens. In addition, the color calibration hardware I have worked with typically instructs to lower monitor brightness to fall within a certain range. I'm not sure why this is so, but it may be related to perceived brightness when editing.

That said, if you like higher brightness for text or editing work, that's a preference, do what works for you.
You guys both have some good points. Thumbs up for pointing out that editing in high brightness is a bug nono for the mass audience.
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#14
Quote from EnigmicAzn
:
Might as well spend another 40 usd to pick up the 144hz version at 27 inches. 32in at QHD is same ppi as 24in FHD for those who don't mind and want larger screen.
Same ppi as 24 is why I picked this size and resolution. I run 3 monitors for work. 2 24 1080 on the sides and a 32 qhd font and center. It's nice because screens are always the same size when you move things around and i don't have to deal with the weird scaling issues that mixing 4k and 1080 causes.
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#15
Quote from dq2014
:
It's harder to differentiate the difference in shades of color at lower brightness. You can experiment with your phone, turn brightness all the way down and all images look a little dull and washed out regardless of how the image is mastered.

250 is fine for most uses. Maybe I'm getting old but I do notice less straining of eyes at slightly higher brightness if youre reading small texts all days. After I have a 350cd/m2 display and I turn the brightness down to 80% (~300cd/m2) and thats a sweet spot for me. although not HDR certified I do notice finer gradients of color at higher brigthness. Contrast is really important in HDR too.

There are many other variables that cause eye strain and everyone is sensitive to different things. Flickerless, blue filter, and high refresh rates are some of the examples.

Everybody is different and the best way to figure what people like is to try different monitors themselves at bug box stores
That is your personal preference or issue. I just didn't get why you're sceptical about a 250 nits display having 103% sRGB color gamut. Everybody is different but 103% sRGB is a fixed fact irrespective of the brightness.
And please don't give examples of phones against a monitor. You use your phone is all kind of kind of conditions and just couple of inches from your eyes and that's why you can see your so called color gradient difference which is definitely not the case with a 32 inch monitor.
You can have your preference of a brighter display and may be this one is not for you but why that stopping it from having higher color gamut?
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