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Pulsar G65BN Portable Gas/LPG Dual Fuel Generator - 5500 Rated Watts & 6500 Peak Watts - $549.99 + FS

$549.99
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Nutrend via Newegg has Pulsar G65BN Portable Gas/LPG Dual Fuel Generator - 5500 Rated Watts & 6500 Peak Watts - RV Ready - CARB Compliant on sale for $549.99.

https://www.newegg.com/p/9SIA08CB...08CBWN2171
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Joined Jun 2017
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#31
Quote from speas
:
I need something that will run my refrigerator, a small air conditioning unit or a small space heater, and potentially a deep freezer. It would also be nice to run my wireless router modem and maybe a television.



This should be more than enough right?
Look at ohms law. It'll tell you what kind of watts/amps youll need for all of that.
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#32
Quote from Dr. J
:
The whole issue of bonded vs. unbonded generators is interesting, actually; some manufacturers will have instructions on how to bond/unbond the gen (just a jumper between N and G in the generator) but the usual issue will be GFCI's not liking the stray currents that a bonded generator can cause, but really this only amounts to the fact that you only want the ground and neutral bonded at a single location in the house.
Under the following conditions, OSHA directs (29 CFR 1926.404(f)(3)(i)) that the frame of a portable generator need not be grounded (connected to earth) and that the frame may serve as the ground (in place of the earth):
The generator supplies only equipment mounted on the generator and/or cord and plug-connected equipment through receptacles mounted on the generator, § 1926.404(f)(3)(i)(A), and
The noncurrent-carrying metal parts of equipment (such as the fuel tank, the internal combustion engine, and the generator's housing) are bonded to the generator frame, and the equipment grounding conductor terminals (of the power receptacles that are a part of [mounted on] the generator) are bonded to the generator frame, § 1926.404(f)(3)(i)(B).
Thus, rather than connect to a grounding electrode system, such as a driven ground rod, the generator's frame replaces the grounding electrode.
If these conditions do not exist, then a grounding electrode, such as a ground rod, is required.
If the portable generator is providing electric power to a structure by connection via a transfer switch to a structure (home, office, shop, trailer, or similar) it must be connected to a grounding electrode system, such as a driven ground rod. The transfer switch must be approved for the use and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions by a qualified electrician.
Grounding requirements for generators connected via transfer switches are covered by Article 250 of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
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#33
Quote from PoorFatKid
:
Under the following conditions, OSHA directs (29 CFR 1926.404(f)(3)(i)) that the frame of a portable generator need not be grounded (connected to earth) and that the frame may serve as the ground (in place of the earth):
The generator supplies only equipment mounted on the generator and/or cord and plug-connected equipment through receptacles mounted on the generator, § 1926.404(f)(3)(i)(A), and
The noncurrent-carrying metal parts of equipment (such as the fuel tank, the internal combustion engine, and the generator's housing) are bonded to the generator frame, and the equipment grounding conductor terminals (of the power receptacles that are a part of [mounted on] the generator) are bonded to the generator frame, § 1926.404(f)(3)(i)(B).
Thus, rather than connect to a grounding electrode system, such as a driven ground rod, the generator's frame replaces the grounding electrode.
If these conditions do not exist, then a grounding electrode, such as a ground rod, is required.
If the portable generator is providing electric power to a structure by connection via a transfer switch to a structure (home, office, shop, trailer, or similar) it must be connected to a grounding electrode system, such as a driven ground rod. The transfer switch must be approved for the use and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions by a qualified electrician.
Grounding requirements for generators connected via transfer switches are covered by Article 250 of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
Doesn't matter if the generator frame is grounded or not, it matters if the neutral and ground are bonded or not, lest you can get stray currents that will migrate through the frame (and anything grounded to it.... like say the metal frame of an appliance that is running off the generator).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkjjZJgaINA

Generally speaking you'd want a floating N when you're hooking a generator up to a panel (something where the N/G are already bound), and a bound neutral when you're running it by itself directly powering equipment.

That video does a good demonstration of what happens.
Floating N, ungrounded generator, short - frame (and anything connected to it) is effectively electrified (120V frame to N) (around 10 mins)
Floating N, grounded generator, short - same as above
Bonded N, grounded generator, short - breaker trips

So why would you NOT want a bound neutral? Generally you only want the G/N bound at one point, closest to where your power comes from. If it's bound at other points, the ground wire can effectively become a neutral, and power will return via the G/bare wire, not a good thing.
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#34
Quote from Dr. J
:
Doesn't matter if the generator frame is grounded or not, it matters if the neutral and ground are bonded or not, lest you can get stray currents that will migrate through the frame (and anything grounded to it.... like say the metal frame of an appliance that is running off the generator).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkjjZJgaINA

Generally speaking you'd want a floating N when you're hooking a generator up to a panel (something where the N/G are already bound), and a bound neutral when you're running it by itself directly powering equipment.

That video does a good demonstration of what happens.
Floating N, ungrounded generator, short - frame (and anything connected to it) is effectively electrified (120V frame to N) (around 10 mins)
Floating N, grounded generator, short - same as above
Bonded N, grounded generator, short - breaker trips

So why would you NOT want a bound neutral? Generally you only want the G/N bound at one point, closest to where your power comes from. If it's bound at other points, the ground wire can effectively become a neutral, and power will return via the G/bare wire, not a good thing.
"Doesn't matter if the generator frame is grounded or not" - Grounding the Generator – The National Electric Code (NEC), as well as many local electrical codes, may require the generator to be connected to earth ground. The most common application that requires a ground rod is when you are using the generator as a separately derived system to provide back up power to your house. Typically this is when a transfer switch has a switched neutral.
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#35
Quote from PoorFatKid
:
"Doesn't matter if the generator frame is grounded or not" - Grounding the Generator – The National Electric Code (NEC), as well as many local electrical codes, may require the generator to be connected to earth ground. The most common application that requires a ground rod is when you are using the generator as a separately derived system to provide back up power to your house. Typically this is when a transfer switch has a switched neutral.
Christ you are either daft or oblivious; grounding has basically nothing to do with floating neutral and the issues it can cause (or rather a bonded neutral). I didn't say NOT to ground the thing; you are off on some tangent arguing with yourself.
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#36
Quote from Dr. J
:
Christ you are either daft or oblivious; grounding has basically nothing to do with floating neutral and the issues it can cause (or rather a bonded neutral). I didn't say NOT to ground the thing; you are off on some tangent arguing with yourself.
I merely saw that you stated that- "Doesn't matter if the generator frame is grounded or not". Not daft, nor oblivious. My apologies for upsetting you. Was not intentional.
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#37
does this one come with an electric starter?
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#38
Quote from Tinglarry
:
does this one come with an electric starter?
No it doesn't
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#39
Quote from cjgeno
:
No it doesn't
then hard pass! for this price, you should DEFINITELY have electric start, if not 50% more power too.

also, to the person saying "dirty" power is tripping their UPS, it's unlikely that it's dirty (aka lots of noise/THD). it's almost certainly that these run *fast* without load (like as much as 63Hz) and slow under heavy load (maybe 58Hz?)..

dirty power is usually things like modified sine wave inverters (which are nothing more than a notched square wave). those can cause issues with inductive loads where the sharp edges can cause lossy/heat-inducing effects in motors/coils/transformers/etc.
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#40
I have a different model 4400 watts with dual gas & propane setup. It runs every major appliance like the fridge, cenrtal heat & tv/lights. The electric start is a nice feature but the pull start will also work. My experience is that regular gas is more powerful than propane.
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#41
Because it is open-frame, and is not an inverter-generator, I expect that it is fairly noisy under load. But, just how noisy? (Couldn't find any listed noise spec.)

Can anyone point me in the right direction?
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#42
Quote from Dr. J
:
Do you mean the whole furnace or the blower? A furnace is really just a couple blowers/motors and a transformer. Really basic electronics.

I have a couple UPSs that are wigged out by my generator too, and it's rated at "<5% THD". Some of the (especially cheaper) generators you see have absolutely horrid THD - the Duromax ones you'll see that are really attractive (e.g. high kW for the price) are labeled "<13%" and Duromax [duromaxpower.com]says typically 10-12%.

We were without power for Isaias for 7 days and I really noticed the generator being unhappy particularly with our well pump (240V) - the pump would kick on and the UPSs all around the house would beep - I even had one that wouldn't run at ALL (kept cycling output power) even though the battery was fully charged. I was tempted to bring a PQA home to analyze the power (e.g. actually measure the THD) but never got around to it.
I think it's the blower, but it doesn't really matter since it's useless without the blower.
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#43
Quote from PoorFatKid
:
My furnace also did not run on my generator until I fixed a grounding issue. My problem was not the generator THD but grounding. It has some sort of flame sensor that was looking for the proper grounding. Runs just fine now.
I think this is my issue too. It would not run on a cheap Sportsman generator but it ran fine on a friend's large Champion generator. Originally it had a problem with the Sportsman a showed an "Open Ground" error on the panel, which I fixed by using a ground-neutral bond plug like you see often for RV generators. Then the furnace would light, but when the blower kicked on it would just fail due to what I think is the flame sensor or some kind of current sensor. An electrician friend said I could try and put it through a UPS, but since the other generator worked fine I'm just going to assume it's something in the cheap generator due to the output itself.
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#44
Quote from denisesballs
:
I think it's the blower, but it doesn't really matter since it's useless without the blower.

My point was a furnace is a really simple piece of equipment to be having issues with shitty THD. Perhaps if it's a really new sexy model with lots of bells and whistles, but that's just the controller. Any real power is in the motors.
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#45
I have a buddy that uses a pellet stove for heat. After setting up his back up generator, wired to the main panel, the pellet stove would not run on the generator power. Apparently the controls of some pellet stoves may also be somewhat sensitive to power requirements. His pellet stove is about 300 watts all in.
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