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Select Amazon Accounts: Select Purina Pro Plan Dog & Cat Food EXPIRED

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Amazon offers Select Amazon Accounts: 30% Off Select Purina Pro Plan Dog & Cat Food when you 'clip' the coupon on the product page and check out via Subscribe & Save. Shipping is free w/ Prime or on $25+ orders. Thanks Lillybulldog

Note, you may cancel Subscribe & Save any time after your order ships. Coupons are typically one-time use. The coupon may be targeted.

Examples (price after coupon and 5% S&S discount):
  • 12-Pack 13oz Purina Pro Plan Grain Free Adult Canned Wet Dog Food
  • & More (look for items marked "Subscribe & Save 30% off your first subscription order")
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Edited September 19, 2020 at 07:36 AM by
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30% off first order on select foods, other food offers are different discounts of money off coupons or different percent off subscribe and save.

Too many to list individually so I posted the generic proplan search on amazon to be scrolled through. Once again you must be logged into account for the discounted products to show.

Have a great Saturday everyone.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=propla...nb_sb_noss
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36 Comments

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Joined Oct 2012
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#16
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Petsmart's Authority brand blows this out of the water for around the same price. And I've never met a cat or dog that wouldn't eat it.

And I've found many vets recommend the products that have been marketed to them since university when they good huge price breaks. It's trained-by-manufacturers habit. And, huge manufacturers often give price breaks for more sales via vet practices. See: https://www.petsnmore.org/2015/05...-true.html

Oh, and I've got 2 recently weaned foster kittens who won't touch the Purina or even worse Royal Canin that was donated to the shelter -- by the manufacturers -- and provided to me.

One is eating my older kitten's dry Acana and the other is eating her Acana and Authority wet.
We had my dog on Authority as a puppy, never real loved it. Switched to Science Diet as an adult and didn't eat much either. We have her on purina one wet food and she loves it.
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#17
Thanks OP; ordered under S&S!
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#18
I have always fed my dogs dry food. Not even expensive stuff.

When I was a kid, we used wet food, dogs always had bad breath and rotting teeth.
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#19
Thanks op was able to get 15$ off my dogs 30lb bag appreciated 🙌
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#20
Quote from CheapisChic
:
I try to get the best cat food I can afford atm and the best I can do typically ranks a 5 out of 10 on the catfood database site. I'm paying less than $1/lb for several different brands. I always get no corn, no soy, no wheat food.

So I always thought Purina had a lot of nerve charging twice that for their cat food when it's no better and does contain corn, soy, and wheat.
could you share what brand and where you buy it?
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Joined Nov 2019
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#21
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Overall CatFoodDB has reviewed 92 Purina Pro Plan cat food products. Together they average 4.6 / 10 paws, which makes Purina Pro Plan a significantly below average overall cat food brand when compared to all the other brands in our database. http://catfooddb.com/brand/purina%20pro%20plane

It's not at all difficult to find a much better food around the same price.

Pet food by-products can contain:
Feet
Backs
Livers
Lungs
Heads
Brains
Spleen
Frames
Kidneys
Stomachs
Intestines
Undeveloped eggs

The Truth About Animal By-Products in Dog Food: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/ch...-products/ [dogfoodadvisor.com]
Did you even bother to read the article that you linked?

" When comparing animal by-product meals with their "regular" meal counterparts, the differences can be nutritionally insignificant.
For example, in the case of rendered ingredients, the digestibility, biological value and amino acid content of both poultry and poultry by-product meals are nearly identical."


They don't condemn all by-products, merely suggest that pet-food grade by-products are "superior" to feed-grade ones.

Which is actually hilarious because.... well I went and found the study [readcube.com] that they cite for that claim. Seems they need to actually read their citations too, because the first conclusion of linked study is
"1. The perceived higher quality of pet food-grade PBM is not justified when considering fat stability."

On top of citations 5-7 being bulleted underneath this "important study" using numbers and claims that don't show up anywhere in said study...

It's a pretty manipulative article overall with implications and choice words taking precedent over any actual data. To be expected of an article that tries to paint liver, brains, and kidneys as unsavory when they're some of the most nutrient rich organs often prioritized by natural predators.
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Joined Apr 2013
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#22
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Overall CatFoodDB has reviewed 92 Purina Pro Plan cat food products. Together they average 4.6 / 10 paws, which makes Purina Pro Plan a significantly below average overall cat food brand when compared to all the other brands in our database. http://catfooddb.com/brand/purina%20pro%20plane

It's not at all difficult to find a much better food around the same price.

Pet food by-products can contain:
Feet
Backs
Livers
Lungs
Heads
Brains
Spleen
Frames
Kidneys
Stomachs
Intestines
Undeveloped eggs

The Truth About Animal By-Products in Dog Food: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/ch...-products/
I think it's funny how people evaluate pet food by human standards. Just because we may find eating a spleen offensive and disgusting, we assume that it must not be ok for our pet to eat it. Humans are not dogs and cats!! Cats and dogs have been surviving in the wild for millions of years by eating entire animals. Do you really think in the middle of eating a rabbit they stopped and said "gross! a spleen! I can't eat that!!"??. Meat is meat!!
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Joined Dec 2008
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#23
I agree. I asked my vet about this explicitly. They carry Royal Canin but his words to me "Well most of the vets and vet techs I know feed Purina Pro Plan". They don't sell it, they sell Royal Canin. He won't get a kick back at all and yet that is what his recommendation was.

Also note that these grain free foods can cause health issues in some dogs so he advised against it specifically.
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#24
Quote from jkinz
:
I agree. I asked my vet about this explicitly. They carry Royal Canin but his words to me "Well most of the vets and vet techs I know feed Purina Pro Plan". They don't sell it, they sell Royal Canin. He won't get a kick back at all and yet that is what his recommendation was.

Also note that these grain free foods can cause health issues in some dogs so he advised against it specifically.
Royal Canin is even worse than Purina on ingredients and nutrition. A special diet my vet prescribed when I didn't know better KILLED my cat within weeks. It turns out it had NO MEAT or even by-products. The company's kibble for mothers and babies has no meat at all, just by-products.

There is some evidence to not feeding dogs a grain-free diet, but not the crap these companies put into their foods. Canidae uses high-quality grains, for example.

And wild cats largely eat only the meat, unlike a not-so-picky wolf, so a grain-free diet for house cats holds merit. Cats need more more protein than dogs. This is called science.

These are the misleading sales techniques these huge multinationals use on veterinarians: "Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell veterinarians and their staff that the legal definition of many by-product ingredients allow diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal carcasses. Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell consumers that the FDA and each State Department of Agriculture openly allows diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal material in pet food with no warning to the consumer."
https://truthaboutpetfood.com/wha...g-to-vets/
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Last edited by PossumLodge September 22, 2020 at 09:26 AM.
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#25
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Royal Canin is even worse than Purina on ingredients and nutrition. A special diet my vet prescribed when I didn't know better KILLED my cat within weeks. It turns out it had NO MEAT or even by-products. The company's kibble for mothers and babies has no meat at all, just by-products.

There is some evidence to not feeding dogs a grain-free diet, but not the crap these companies put into their foods. Canidae uses high-quality grains, for example.

And wild cats largely eat only the meat, unlike a not-so-picky wolf, so a grain-free diet for house cats holds merit. Cats need more more protein than dogs. This is called science.

These are the misleading sales techniques these huge multinationals use on veterinarians: "Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell veterinarians and their staff that the legal definition of many by-product ingredients allow diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal carcasses. Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell consumers that the FDA and each State Department of Agriculture openly allows diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal material in pet food with no warning to the consumer."
https://truthaboutpetfood.com/wha...g-to-vets/
Also, Mars owns Banfield, Blue Pearl, Pet Partners, VCA, & AniCura veterinary hospitals.
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#26
Quote from Itsbunnytime
:
Also, Mars owns Banfield, Blue Pearl, Pet Partners, VCA, & AniCura veterinary hospitals.
Well, THERE'S your problem. - The Mythbusters.
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Joined Oct 2010
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#27
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Royal Canin is even worse than Purina on ingredients and nutrition. A special diet my vet prescribed when I didn't know better KILLED my cat within weeks. It turns out it had NO MEAT or even by-products. The company's kibble for mothers and babies has no meat at all, just by-products.

There is some evidence to not feeding dogs a grain-free diet, but not the crap these companies put into their foods. Canidae uses high-quality grains, for example.

And wild cats largely eat only the meat, unlike a not-so-picky wolf, so a grain-free diet for house cats holds merit. Cats need more more protein than dogs. This is called science.

These are the misleading sales techniques these huge multinationals use on veterinarians: "Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell veterinarians and their staff that the legal definition of many by-product ingredients allow diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal carcasses. Mars/Royal Canin neglects to tell consumers that the FDA and each State Department of Agriculture openly allows diseased, condemned, and non-slaughtered animal material in pet food with no warning to the consumer."
https://truthaboutpetfood.com/wha...g-to-vets/ [truthaboutpetfood.com]
Is that really a fair assessment of Royal Canin?
  • Founded by a French vet surgeon to prove that a cereal-based recipe could solve a large range of health problems. Proof is in the pudding.
  • Their R&D and dedication to scientific method (over the years), at least on paper, is no joke (just skim over their Wikipedia page). Esp. their explicit stated mandatory goal that no expert should be able to "refute" their science.
  • They have trained specialists and breeders on call to give advice, and to answer questions about their recipe (including explaining what "by-products" they use specifically and why their recipe is actually optimal).
    • From what I've seen around the net from people who called in to ask, nobody was really able to find fault with their answers. I haven't tried to call myself (I probably should); although, it'd probably be over my head.
  • Their almost non-existent product recall track record is very impressive for a brand so ubiquitous, and used in actual medical scenarios.
Although personally, I do find it dubious given our experiences for the last millennia with nutritional science and ourselves. We have the science to maintain reasonable health and safety even on the infamous "twinkie diet" using supplementation with the help of competent nutritionists, but nobody would really pretend that it's healthy or the best approach to optimal longevity. We always circle back to natural varied balanced diets being optimal. It's doubtful our science with dogs is so comprehensive that it'd be different.
But to fault Royal Canin as bad dog food on the basis of what is claimed in your post without real convincing evidence to debunk the company built on such (supposed) scientific rigor doesn't seem like a good argument.

The conspiracy theory stuff I think is way too weak an argument, doesn't hold water, and is overly prevalent in the criticism of major pet food mfgrs. It's easily countered by pointing out that (all the counter articles I've seen from you for example) can be traced back to entities like "product strategy to shelf" consultants with a vested interest in new dog products trying to take market share from the status quo.
Honestly looks to me like not much more than the equivalent of ad hominem attacks.

All in all, I feel that StreetJedi and PoorFatKid comments in these dog food threads are the most reasonable and convincing. Especially when supported with that (admittedly scientifically weak) study using collected statistics to claim that households that fed their dogs on diets with food they were eating themselves lived up to 3 years longer.
The only big difference in opinion I have is that being able to provide complete nutrition safely to dogs with our own food is non-trivial, and using dog food as a poor man's nutritionist provided nutrient supplementation seems like the best solution for us laymen. (ie: I disagree with the notion that dog kibble is only justified by being cheaper and laziness, as oversimplification)
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Last edited by junhao123 September 23, 2020 at 01:57 AM.
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#28
Quote from junhao123
:
Is that really a fair assessment of Royal Canin?
  • Founded by a French vet surgeon to prove that a cereal-based recipe could solve a large range of health problems. Proof is in the pudding.
  • Their R&D and dedication to scientific method (over the years), at least on paper, is no joke (just skim over their Wikipedia page). Esp. their explicit stated mandatory goal that no expert should be able to "refute" their science.
  • They have trained specialists and breeders on call to give advice, and to answer questions about their recipe (including explaining what "by-products" they use specifically and why their recipe is actually optimal).
    • From what I've seen around the net from people who called in to ask, nobody was really able to find fault with their answers. I haven't tried to call myself (I probably should); although, it'd probably be over my head.
  • Their almost non-existent product recall track record is very impressive for a brand so ubiquitous, and used in actual medical scenarios.
Although personally, I do find it dubious given our experiences for the last millennia with nutritional science and ourselves. We have the science to maintain reasonable health and safety even on the infamous "twinkie diet" using supplementation with the help of competent nutritionists, but nobody would really pretend that it's healthy or the best approach to optimal longevity. We always circle back to natural varied balanced diets being optimal. It's doubtful our science with dogs is so comprehensive that it'd be different.
But to fault Royal Canin as bad dog food on the basis of what is claimed in your post without real convincing evidence to debunk the company built on such (supposed) scientific rigor doesn't seem like a good argument.
How did the corporate kool-aid taste? LMAO

I don't care who founded it. It is now owned by a multinational driven by profits. And only profits.
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#29
Quote from PossumLodge
:
How did the corporate kool-aid taste? https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima.../emot-LMAO.gif

I don't care who founded it. It is now owned by a multinational driven by profits. And only profits.
I don't think the ability to avoid having to use food recalls to avoid FDA reports, historically being associated with veterinary feed businesses, as well as having heavy investments in R&D and having their products backed by peer-reviewed studies, as well as being a popular branded feed as part of regimens in treating illnesses constitutes as kool-aid.

You've missed the point I'm making.
The founder designed a cereal-based feed which he proved empirically worked to mitigate and resolve health problems. It's the cited reason for founding Royal Canin, which is now ubiquitous.
He has proved with experience and a very successful product, that a grain-based (cereal) dog feed (with the addition of scientifically-backed additives), improved the health of dogs.

I don't understand your reasoning. Every business is driven by profits. Oracle surely qualifies as a company that is driven by "only profits". They use questionable business tactics. It doesn't make their DB any less advanced.
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Last edited by junhao123 September 23, 2020 at 08:01 AM.

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#30
Quote from junhao123
:
I don't think the ability to avoid having to use food recalls to avoid FDA reports, historically being associated with veterinary feed businesses, as well as having heavy investments in R&D and having their products backed by peer-reviewed studies, as well as being a popular branded feed as part of regimens in treating illnesses constitutes as kool-aid.

You've missed the point I'm making.
The founder designed a cereal-based feed which he proved empirically worked to mitigate and resolve health problems. It's the cited reason for founding Royal Canin, which is now ubiquitous.
He has proved with experience and a very successful product, that a grain-based (cereal) dog feed (with the addition of scientifically-backed additives), improved the health of dogs.

I don't understand your reasoning. Every business is driven by profits. Oracle surely qualifies as a company that is driven by "only profits". They use questionable business tactics. It doesn't make their DB any less advanced.
Oracle's products don't run the risk of killing animals (as RC did mine) or shortening their lives. What a ridiculous comparison. Give up on your spurious arguments. And, if I were you, I'd check my corporate kool-aid for ground-up brains.
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