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Select Amazon Accounts: Select Purina Pro Plan Dog & Cat Food EXPIRED

30% Off
w/ Subscribe & Save
+58 Deal Score
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Amazon offers Select Amazon Accounts: 30% Off Select Purina Pro Plan Dog & Cat Food when you 'clip' the coupon on the product page and check out via Subscribe & Save. Shipping is free w/ Prime or on $25+ orders. Thanks Lillybulldog

Note, you may cancel Subscribe & Save any time after your order ships. Coupons are typically one-time use. The coupon may be targeted.

Examples (price after coupon and 5% S&S discount):
  • 12-Pack 13oz Purina Pro Plan Grain Free Adult Canned Wet Dog Food
  • & More (look for items marked "Subscribe & Save 30% off your first subscription order")
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Edited September 19, 2020 at 07:36 AM by
Must be logged in to see the promotional discount
30% off first order on select foods, other food offers are different discounts of money off coupons or different percent off subscribe and save.

Too many to list individually so I posted the generic proplan search on amazon to be scrolled through. Once again you must be logged into account for the discounted products to show.

Have a great Saturday everyone.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=propla...nb_sb_noss
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36 Comments

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This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2020
New User
4 Posts
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#31
Quote from junhao123
:
Is that really a fair assessment of Royal Canin?
  • Founded by a French vet surgeon to prove that a cereal-based recipe could solve a large range of health problems. Proof is in the pudding.
  • Their R&D and dedication to scientific method (over the years), at least on paper, is no joke (just skim over their Wikipedia page). Esp. their explicit stated mandatory goal that no expert should be able to "refute" their science.
  • They have trained specialists and breeders on call to give advice, and to answer questions about their recipe (including explaining what "by-products" they use specifically and why their recipe is actually optimal).
    • From what I've seen around the net from people who called in to ask, nobody was really able to find fault with their answers. I haven't tried to call myself (I probably should); although, it'd probably be over my head.
  • Their almost non-existent product recall track record is very impressive for a brand so ubiquitous, and used in actual medical scenarios.
Although personally, I do find it dubious given our experiences for the last millennia with nutritional science and ourselves. We have the science to maintain reasonable health and safety even on the infamous "twinkie diet" using supplementation with the help of competent nutritionists, but nobody would really pretend that it's healthy or the best approach to optimal longevity. We always circle back to natural varied balanced diets being optimal. It's doubtful our science with dogs is so comprehensive that it'd be different.
But to fault Royal Canin as bad dog food on the basis of what is claimed in your post without real convincing evidence to debunk the company built on such (supposed) scientific rigor doesn't seem like a good argument.

The conspiracy theory stuff I think is way too weak an argument, doesn't hold water, and is overly prevalent in the criticism of major pet food mfgrs. It's easily countered by pointing out that (all the counter articles I've seen from you for example) can be traced back to entities like "product strategy to shelf" consultants with a vested interest in new dog products trying to take market share from the status quo.
Honestly looks to me like not much more than the equivalent of ad hominem attacks.

All in all, I feel that StreetJedi and PoorFatKid comments in these dog food threads are the most reasonable and convincing. Especially when supported with that (admittedly scientifically weak) study using collected statistics to claim that households that fed their dogs on diets with food they were eating themselves lived up to 3 years longer.
The only big difference in opinion I have is that being able to provide complete nutrition safely to dogs with our own food is non-trivial, and using dog food as a poor man's nutritionist provided nutrient supplementation seems like the best solution for us laymen. (ie: I disagree with the notion that dog kibble is only justified by being cheaper and laziness, as oversimplification)
What conspiracies are you referring to?
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Joined Dec 2011
L1: Learner
7 Posts
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#32
Great deal! Just recently switched over to Purina Pro Plan from Taste of the Wild due to worries of diet-associated DCM. Bought my first bag at Pet Supplies Plus when they had 20% off but this is an even better deal with s&s and my CF card (5% on amazon.com). Thanks OP!
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Joined Oct 2010
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#33
Quote from Itsbunnytime
:
What conspiracies are you referring to?
Basically what PossumLodge is now doing. Instead of addressing why Royal Canin might be garbage, or properly debunking the validity of Royal Canin's ingredients or research,
just defaults to emotional non-sequiturs and using "corporate" and "kool-aid" as if it is some kind of disproof. And then referring to some kind of conspiracy where everyone is just being brainwashed, and woe unto you if you don't immediately agree that it is the only explanation.

It is the equivalent of using ad hominem attacks when someone replies "that guy is kind of a reputable scientist who has invested a lot of time researching and testing his theory".
"No, he's a rich manipulative sell-out, where do you think he got all his money? From selling lies to you."
And then lashing out when I say, "I think you are going a little too far with your claims."

Pointing out his/her experience with RC possibly causing his dog's death is fine and is at least sort of useful.

Obviously, there's no longer anything of value to further discuss when it gets to this point.
But I tried.
I wanted to know if there was an actual good reason to distrust RC; there's other possible reasons RC is a popular brand beyond astro-turfing and lobbying. It's not really a fair nor reasonable reason to claim that RC is bad.
Furthermore of application is that Royal Canin's entire founding reasoning is based on using cereal grains as a base, on the subject of "grain-free". It'd have been helpful to have some decent well reasoned comments.
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Last edited by junhao123 September 23, 2020 at 09:04 AM.
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Joined Mar 2020
New User
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#34
None of the cat food is 30% off, only dog food. Should change the title
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Joined Oct 2004
L6: Expert
1,685 Posts
200 Reputation
#35
Quote from PossumLodge
:
Overall CatFoodDB has reviewed 92 Purina Pro Plan cat food products. Together they average 4.6 / 10 paws, which makes Purina Pro Plan a significantly below average overall cat food brand when compared to all the other brands in our database. http://catfooddb.com/brand/purina%20pro%20plane

It's not at all difficult to find a much better food around the same price.

Pet food by-products can contain:
Feet
Backs
Livers
Lungs
Heads
Brains
Spleen
Frames
Kidneys
Stomachs
Intestines
Undeveloped eggs

The Truth About Animal By-Products in Dog Food: https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/ch...-products/
Of all the posts from the thread I don't know why you chose mine. My reply was to somebody that went off on a tangent about this not being fit for human consumption.

Enjoy your podium.

P.S. Do you like sausage? If you ever eat sausage with natural casing then you're eating intestine. The intestine is the casing that holds the sausage. Also do you eat refined sugar? Refined sugar is made with charred cow bones to make the sugar look more white.
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Joined Oct 2008
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Original Poster
Pro
#36
Vanilla extract uses a beavers anus gland,
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Joined Dec 2017
L6: Expert
1,190 Posts
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#37
Quote from Lillybulldog
:
Vanilla extract uses a beavers anus gland,
Not really, but close. Castoreum comes from the castor gland/castor sacs. Though anatomically it is very close to the anal gland. It's not used much these days for vanilla extract. Its mostly used in fragrances, medication and trapping, mostly the latter. Expensive stuff. Some folks "milk" castoreum or remove, dry and sell the sacs. Best part is when used in foods they just call it "natural flavoring".

The only reason I know any of this is due to an uncle that spends a lot of time trapping in Canada.
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