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2-Piece Klein Tools Non-Contact Voltage Tester + GFCI Outlet Tester EXPIRED

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Home Depot has 2-Piece Klein Tools Non-Contact Voltage Tester + GFCI Outlet Tester (NCVT5KIT) on sale for $19.97. Shipping is free. Thanks jvin
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Edited October 22, 2020 at 05:51 AM by
2-Piece Non-Contact Voltage Tester with Laser Pointer and GFCI Outlet Tester Tool Set only 19.99 at Home Depot.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Klein.../309039693
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#16
I think these are probably the most basic thing for homeowners who want to do anything with their electrical. They can be used to troubleshoot problems, but are also just good for confirming wires are not live, before touching. This doesn't seem like that great of a price though. Isn't this about what these things cost usually?
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#17
Quote from thanatossassin
:
They have options with either a laser pointer or a flashlight. I, myself, own the flashlight version which is quite helpful.

I could see the laser being useful when working with an apprentice.
they have multiple versions. some with laser pointer, some with flashlight. Some have a laser distance meter. I have the one with theIR Thermometer. [homedepot.com]Seems to work well so far.
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#18
Quote from markwhitney
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I think these are probably the most basic thing for homeowners who want to do anything with their electrical. They can be used to troubleshoot problems, but are also just good for confirming wires are not live, before touching. This doesn't seem like that great of a price though. Isn't this about what these things cost usually?
There are cheaper versions out there that may or may not be as durable. I usually stick the non-contact tester in the receptacle and flip breakers until it stops beeping. It usually works for the first floor (breaker in basement) but if you get a loud enough one it could work with second floor.
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#19
FYI non-contact voltage testers can and do go bad. Always start a session of use with a test to verify your tester is functional before relying on its readout.
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#20
Quote from abutcher
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For nearby cats.
Meow you know
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#21
Quote from bonkman
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I bought this with a multimeter years ago for a few bucks less. The tools are useful for a homeowner. Saved me from getting zapped a couple times and helped find a janky outlet that a tenant wrecked
I have that set also. Haven't really use multimeter much, because lack of knowledge . Usually have google before using it. The other 2 is quite useful. Just used last weekend when replacing a switch and outlet.
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#22
I'm a new home-owner and just bought an old house with ungrounded outlets. I'm planning on going around the house and swapping them out for GFCI outlets so I can plug in 3-prong devices. Do I need something like this? Is this a good price? I have no idea what I'm doing and just hoping not to electrocute myself or burn the house down Smilie
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#23
Quote from yuyak
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I'm a new home-owner and just bought an old house with ungrounded outlets. I'm planning on going around the house and swapping them out for GFCI outlets so I can plug in 3-prong devices. Do I need something like this? Is this a good price? I have no idea what I'm doing and just hoping not to electrocute myself or burn the house down https://static.slickdealscdn.com/ima...lies/smile.gif
If you have ungrounded outlets in an old house you most likely have 2 conductor wires (hot and neutral) for 3 prong or GFCI outlets you need 3, the 3rd being the ground wire.

edit: apparently, a GFCI will add some level of protection even with 2 conductors though the appliances still remain ungrounded.
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Last edited by GP314 October 20, 2020 at 11:00 AM.
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#24
Would this work in diagnosing (low voltage) sprinkler wire issues?
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#25
Quote from GP314
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If you have ungrounded outlets in an old house you most likely have 2 conductor wires (hot and neutral) for 3 prong or GFCI outlets you need 3, the 3rd being the ground wire.
Yeah, they'd remain ungrounded. From my research (and I'd love to hear if I misunderstood) is that swapping them with GFCI (w/o grounding) will at least reduce risk of electrical fires, even if it doesn't protect my devices from surges. I'm not sure if it's worth the effort/cost to rewire the house and get ground wires in everywhere.
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#26
Quote from GP314
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If you have ungrounded outlets in an old house you most likely have 2 conductor wires (hot and neutral) for 3 prong or GFCI outlets you need 3, the 3rd being the ground wire.
Unless everything is grounded through the conduit.
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10-20-2020 at 11:00 AM
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#28
Quote from yuyak
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Yeah, they'd remain ungrounded. From my research (and I'd love to hear if I misunderstood) is that swapping them with GFCI (w/o grounding) will at least reduce risk of electrical fires, even if it doesn't protect my devices from surges. I'm not sure if it's worth the effort/cost to rewire the house and get ground wires in everywhere.
I'm not an electrician so take this with a grain of salt, but it would work.

First off, GFCI doesn't protect from surges. It protects electricity from going through you to ground. It does this by essentially "comparing" the hot and neutral. When electricity is working properly, there's no net magnetic field since electricity going into the circuit is also exiting the circuit. If you become part of the circuit (wet hair meets hairdryer so electricity goes from heating element to you to ground), now there's no returning electricity which means that there's a magnetic field. That induces the switch to trip.

So I'm not sure about protecting against electrical fires, but it would protect you from being shocked.
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#29
Quote from yuyak
:
Yeah, they'd remain ungrounded. From my research (and I'd love to hear if I misunderstood) is that swapping them with GFCI (w/o grounding) will at least reduce risk of electrical fires, even if it doesn't protect my devices from surges. I'm not sure if it's worth the effort/cost to rewire the house and get ground wires in everywhere.
I believe it will protect you from shock too since the GFCI will still be able to detect the difference in current going in and out. Now I'm curious, I'll look into this when I have time. I haven't owned a house with 2 conductor wires but its good to know.
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#30
Quote from jeff34270
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Unless everything is grounded through the conduit.
This is a way to do it but as with any work I would check your local electrical codes before doing anything just to be sure. And make sure the conduit does provide a good path to ground. You never know if there is a break on the conduit, I've seen installations where there is only conduit where there is a need to protect the wires from nicks and cuts or used as a channel inside walls and cavities to fish the wire through but none in the ceiling or crawl space
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Last edited by GP314 October 20, 2020 at 11:11 AM.
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