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Dell Precision 7740 Laptop: i7-9850H, Quadro RTX 3000, 17.3" 1080p, 8GB, 256GB SSD, $1449+ free s/h

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$1449 + free s/h
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Created 11-18-2020 at 03:29 PM by iconian
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#2
No webcam. But an excellent desktop replacement IMO.
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#3
I must be missing something, but according to benchmarks:
I7-9850H < Ryzen 7 4800H
Quadro RTX 3000 < RTX 2060
Plus that 8gb 2666mhz ram just looks out of place.
At nearly $1500 i could hardly call that slick.
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#4
Quote from Californify
:
I must be missing something, but according to benchmarks:
I7-9850H < Ryzen 7 4800H
Quadro RTX 3000 < RTX 2060
Plus that 8gb 2666mhz ram just looks out of place.
At nearly $1500 i could hardly call that slick.
What professional model laptop would you recommend in this price range? At first glance, I thought this looks like an excellent deal on this model, and it has tons of expandability (4 memory slots, 4 m.2 slots)
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#5
Quote from Californify
:
I must be missing something, but according to benchmarks:
I7-9850H < Ryzen 7 4800H
Quadro RTX 3000 < RTX 2060
Plus that 8gb 2666mhz ram just looks out of place.
At nearly $1500 i could hardly call that slick.
I'm really curious to see what idiot would pay 1500 for these specs 😂
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#6
Quote from asunwoo
:
What professional model laptop would you recommend in this price range? At first glance, I thought this looks like an excellent deal on this model, and it has tons of expandability (4 memory slots, 4 m.2 slots)
If you don't need all the GPU power/expandability and are interested in something more compact with a beefier CPU, I'd maybe cross shop it against this HP Zbook deal I posted earlier today:
https://slickdeals.net/f/14575780-hp-zbook-studio-g7-mobile-workstation-laptop-i9-10885h-16gb-512gb-nvme-ssd-quadro-t1000-max-q-4gb-15-6-1080p-win10-pro-config-1545-shipped

But - the HP has soldered RAM (lame) and the cheap i9 config locks you into 16GB, and the T1000 Max-Q is significantly less capable than an RTX 3000. I'd also expect better overall thermals and lower fan noise from the larger Dell.
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#7
Quote from Nero_Forte
:
I'm really curious to see what idiot would pay 1500 for these specs 😂
The kind of idiots that develop and run computational engineering routines that can take hours to run, and which are corrupted if the computer crashes. Engineering workstations are typically "certified" for use in certain applications or with certain software. I don't know how that plays out now, but that was the distinction in the past.

There used to be a wider gap between gaming systems and engineering workstations. But for people like me, it has narrowed. I bought an Asus TUF A15 a few months ago, and it *smokes* my other Lenovo and Dell portable workstations. But the bottleneck in my parallelized code is reading and writing data to disk. And so having capacity for multiple disks is a good thing. So the Dells and Lenovo workstations are great for that.

I'm running 100% load for hours at a time. The Dells/Lenovos haven't given me problems. I haven't had problems with the Asus A15 either. But you'll read comments here about people who swear "it has bad thermals." I personally haven't had any issues. And I love the Ryzen 4800....

(BTW, I also prefered Dells earlier because of the Linux support versus the new Ryzen 4000s. The Ryzen 4000 support will catch up eventually....)

When you get down to it, a slightly slower computer with non-cutting edge specs that works predictably and does not crash is better (for me and my customers) than a cutting edge computer that does crash or which may crash. It's really a roll of the dice these days, with most reputable brands. But it's a $1000+/day roll of the dice. So risk averse engineers and consultants like me sometimes pay for the slightly less risky, slower solution.

And then we use the money we didn't waste debugging work computer problems to buy gaming systems for non-work....

Edit: I'll also add that engineering workstations are pretty modular to facilitate maintenance in an enterprise environment. So that's valuable to some (enterprise) buyers.
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Last edited by MagentaManatee6559 November 19, 2020 at 06:36 PM.
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#8
Quote from MagentaManatee6559
:
The kind of idiots that develop and run computational engineering routines that can take hours to run, and which are corrupted if the computer crashes. Engineering workstations are typically "certified" for use in certain applications or with certain software. I don't know how that plays out now, but that was the distinction in the past.

There used to be a wider gap between gaming systems and engineering workstations. But for people like me, it has narrowed. I bought an Asus TUF A15 a few months ago, and it *smokes* my other Lenovo and Dell portable workstations. But the bottleneck in my parallelized code is reading and writing data to disk. And so having capacity for multiple disks is a good thing. So the Dells and Lenovo workstations are great for that.

I'm running 100% load for hours at a time. The Dells/Lenovos haven't given me problems. I haven't had problems with the Asus A15 either. But you'll read comments here about people who swear "it has bad thermals." I personally haven't had any issues. And I love the Ryzen 4800....

(BTW, I also prefered Dells earlier because of the Linux support versus the new Ryzen 4000s. The Ryzen 4000 support will catch up eventually....)

When you get down to it, a slightly slower computer with non-cutting edge specs that works predictably and does not crash is better (for me and my customers) than a cutting edge computer that does crash or which may crash. It's really a roll of the dice these days, with most reputable brands. But it's a $1000+/day roll of the dice. So risk averse engineers and consultants like me sometimes pay for the slightly less risky, slower solution.

And then we use the money we didn't waste debugging work computer problems to buy gaming systems for non-work....

Edit: I'll also add that engineering workstations are pretty modular to facilitate maintenance in an enterprise environment. So that's valuable to some (enterprise) buyers.
Thanks for insights, that's what i didn't take into account: reliability and research focus. Suddenly it makes much more sense.
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#9
Quote from asunwoo
:
What professional model laptop would you recommend in this price range? At first glance, I thought this looks like an excellent deal on this model, and it has tons of expandability (4 memory slots, 4 m.2 slots)
My (sincere) question is: would you still go with this professional model when something like https://www.costco.com/msi-ge75-r...84982.html will cost $1200 on BF?
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#10
Quote from Californify
:
I must be missing something, but according to benchmarks:
I7-9850H < Ryzen 7 4800H
Quadro RTX 3000 < RTX 2060
Plus that 8gb 2666mhz ram just looks out of place.
At nearly $1500 i could hardly call that slick.
It's a Quadro not a RTX gaming card. That means Photoshop, Autocad, Premier, Solidworks not wasting your life playing Fortnite. This is a professional workstation. I typically pay $3000-$4000 for these types of systems, albeit more memory bigger drive, Easy fixes-- minimal cost. I'd prefer a Xeon over this--but good mid-level machine. AMD fanboys need to go to college and learn the difference. In professional circles you'd get laughed out of the room for bringing a Ryzen.
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#11
Quote from GlenC3825
:
It's a Quadro not a RTX gaming card. That means Photoshop, Autocad, Premier, Solidworks not wasting your life playing Fortnite. This is a professional workstation. I typically pay $3000-$4000 for these types of systems, albeit more memory bigger drive, Easy fixes-- minimal cost. I'd prefer a Xeon over this--but good mid-level machine. AMD fanboys need to go to college and learn the difference. In professional circles you'd get laughed out of the room for bringing a Ryzen.
Pretty much the entire Silicon Valley works on Macs, and so do I for many years, so no hard feelings, please Smilie
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#12
Not slick at all...
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Last edited by Eigelchen November 19, 2020 at 08:27 PM.
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#13
I thought the RTX3000 are very powerful, not sure if this is the 70, 80 or 90 series... Any of them should be decent IDT.
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#14
Quote from Californify
:
Pretty much the entire Silicon Valley works on Macs, and so do I for many years, so no hard feelings, please Smilie
He is talking about cad/designers/engineers running software made for PC and not mac. The valley is all programmers.
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#15
Quote from GlenC3825
:
It's a Quadro not a RTX gaming card. That means Photoshop, Autocad, Premier, Solidworks not wasting your life playing Fortnite. This is a professional workstation. I typically pay $3000-$4000 for these types of systems, albeit more memory bigger drive, Easy fixes-- minimal cost. I'd prefer a Xeon over this--but good mid-level machine. AMD fanboys need to go to college and learn the difference. In professional circles you'd get laughed out of the room for bringing a Ryzen.
So right... It needs double if not 4 times the ram and another 1tb SSD. I'm running similar configuration with with P1000 I wish my laptop had RTX 3000.
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