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2-Pack GE Polarized Grounding Adaptor EXPIRED

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Amazon has 2-Pack GE Polarized Grounding Adaptor on sale for $1.27. Shipping is free w/ Prime or on orders of $25+.

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Edited January 11, 2021 at 05:11 PM by
GE-Polarized-Grounding-Adapter-14404 - 2 pack - $1.27

https://smile.amazon.com/GE-Polar...00B7PK1TC/
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Joined Apr 2009
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#91
Quote from fyu :
Yea, it doesn't make sense.

It looks like it's grounding to your outlet box, but if your outlet box is grounded, why not change out the outlets?
You use these on non-grounded outlets where your appliance has a grounding prong. In which case you cannot change out the outlet since it will not meet code.
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#92
Quote from chuck4rooke :
You use these on non-grounded outlets where your appliance has a grounding prong. In which case you cannot change out the outlet since it will not meet code.
NEC permits you to swap it for a gfci outlet. The cost of a gfci outlet is $25, and in most cases you only need one to protect an entire circuit (it goes in the first outlet box run from the panel and protects all downstream outlets). If you have outlets run in parallel instead of series you can swap your breakers at the panel for gfci breakers.

Spend the extra money and do it right.
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#93
I usually break the ground pin off.
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#94
Quote from darius11 :
Found that an outlet in a bathroom was attached to the light and only worked when the light was on... with bare wires and wire nuts extending the line in the wall to get to the box for the outlet, which of course wasn't grounded. No inspector would have found that unless they plugged something in and turned the light on and off.

I've never had an inspector find anything meaningful.
Stuff like that starts fires when someone upgrades the switch to a dimmer to control the light, then plugs a device into the outlet. Things that don't dim can really behave badly when dimmed.
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Joined Nov 2011
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#95
Here for the "Polarized" 2021 comments. Did disappoint!
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#96
Quote from dqniel :
It can be as simple as something like an appliance failing and then, when you touch it, the current runs through you rather than the mechanical ground. No need for water to be involved. There's a pretty famous case about a college professor that died from plugging a defective fluorescent lamp into one of these. Had it been grounded or on a GFCI, he would have been fine.
Whats the chances of that happening though??
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#97
Quote from rly723 :
I've heard these things are dangerous but I've have been using one consistently for several years, have a power strip and my tv, Xbox, ps4, laptop, phone chargers connected. Maybe I'm tempting fate but so far so good
Same here. Don't good power strips add protection as well?
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#98
Hilarious how many people are downvoting everyone's comments on how unsafe these things are. As if giving someone the information is somehow hurting your ego because you use them?

Many people assume as long as they use the screw, it provides the safety of a grounded outlet, but it only does IF the receptacle is already wired for grounded wiring - and if it was you'd likely already have a 3 prong outlet already. The screw itself is not grounding just because it's metal.

"The grounding system is a safety feature that helps protect you against electrical shock, which can range from startling to painful to deadly. A true grounding connection is a good idea and is required by code for all new construction; a plug adapter can make you think you have a ground connection when you don't."
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#99
Quote from ebolaboi :
Whats the chances of that happening though??
Chances are pretty good actually and the longer you leave things plugged in the higher the chance gets. Grounding is sort of like taking the EXTRA electricity that is not used by the item and sending it away.
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#100
scary how many comments in this thread are along the lines of "i've been doing this for years and i'm still here....". Same argument people used to make about not wearing seatbelts.

Some of the potential legitimate fixes to the problem of not having grounded outlets can be easy and relatively inexpensive. If your home has metal outlet boxes and metallic sheathed cable (BX), these 2-3 prong adapters will work safely (that is the only situation in which they can be safe). If you already have BX, you can easily switch to a permanent 3 prong solution - it's as simple as replacing the two prong receptacles with three prong and grounding the new receptacles to the metal box. This was the case in my prior old home and was an easy fix. alternatively, if you don't have BX, the upstream GFCI replacement mentioned earlier in the thread can protect the downstream receptacles. Note that protection is still not a ground and may not protect you from an energized fixture/appliance.

most importantly, if this isn't work you're comfortable doing, get somebody who knows what they're doing - it's very basic electrical so the work is not expensive - a lot cheaper than burning down your house.
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Last edited by deal2deal January 12, 2021 at 08:13 AM.
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#101
Quote from Sisco_Doug :
GE is still a thing?
gee, I think so.One of the last massive conglomerates around.
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#102
Quote from Dr. J :
I meant, if you don't have a ground in your box, don't just put a 3 prong outlet in there so you can plug in 3 prong items. Others will likely use it not knowing there is no ground protection. Using these is a much better option.
I replaced a 2 prong with a 3 prong. Box was metal attached to greenfield (flex metal conduit) so I was thinking it would be grounded and (old?) code for 15A. Tested. No ground. Wondering what the heck was going on...turns out that most of the old wiring and conduit was stripped out and replaced with Romex during a major remodel. Ground wire was coiled up behind a switch. Took some effort to figure that out as the main panel and sub panels were a mashup of old and new.
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#103
Quote from deal2deal :
scary how many comments in this thread are along the lines of "i've been doing this for years and i'm still here....". Same argument people used to make about not wearing seatbelts.

Some of the potential legitimate fixes to the problem of not having grounded outlets can be easy and relatively inexpensive. If your home has metal outlet boxes and metallic sheathed cable (BX), these 2-3 prong adapters will work safely (that is the only situation in which they can be safe). If you already have BX, you can easily switch to a permanent 3 prong solution - it's as simple as replacing the two prong receptacles with three prong and grounding the new receptacles to the metal box. This was the case in my prior old home and was an easy fix. alternatively, if you don't have BX, the upstream GFCI replacement mentioned earlier in the thread can protect the downstream receptacles. Note that protection is still not a ground and may not protect you from an energized fixture/appliance.

most importantly, if this isn't work you're comfortable doing, get somebody who knows what they're doing - it's very basic electrical so the work is not expensive - a lot cheaper than burning down your house.
LOL. I wear my seltbelt. Chances are better getting into an accident, no? I've heard/seen more car accidents in the past 3 years here than any house fires in this old neighbourhood.
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#104
Quote from Arcanlaw :
Just don't use the inspector your real estate agent recommends. They do not have your best interests at heart! Ask around for an independent inspector, I found one in my area that agents hated, he found eeeeeeverything and killed a lot of deals. I want to know all the ghosts in the closet before I sign!
Good luck with that in today's market. If you won't buy the house then there are 5 people lined up behind you who will.
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#105
Quote from odie5533 :
I know it's tough to hear, but every year children die from improperly grounded devices created by situations like the one you are describing. I would strongly urge you to replace the outlet you're using with a GFCI outlet and stop using the adapter.

As an example, if your TV develops a short, which is quite common, all the metal parts on the TV may become electrified and if you go to plug in a device you will receive a shock and possibly die.
Grounding only works if the device itself is grounded (has a 3 prong plug). My tv does not.
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