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Airthings Corentium Home Portable Radon Detector EXPIRED

$99
$141.55
+ Free Shipping
+89 Deal Score
27,998 Views
Amazon.com has Airthings Corentium Home Portable Radon Detector (233) on sale for $99. Shipping is free.

Thanks to Deal Editor Discombobulated for finding this deal.

Includes:
  • Airthings Corentium Home
  • 3 AAA batteries
  • Quick Start Guide
  • Airthings 12-months & Customer Support access via Airthings App or website
Features:
  • Battery-operated, digital radon detector.
  • Generate a radon self-inspection report
  • On-screen results show both long and short term readings for a quick overview of your radon levels.

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For anyone that's interested in recent research regarding the standards and how they're derived.

There's no question that Radon increases the rate of lung cancer. There is, however, disagreement on what the normal acceptable level is and the model used to come up with that number.

I'm obviously not an expert so, if you're interested, I recommend you do your own research and form your own conclusions.

http://www.forensic-applications....radon.html
Very detailed and well sourced counter argument.


https://academic.oup.com/jrr/arti...49/4654992
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
"No statistical evidence could support the thesis that the linear model best fits the data over low radon concentrations. We have arrived at an opposite view, supported by several arguments, namely that the linear relationship has typically been pre-assumed in such analyses and that it should be discarded. The data are statistically too weak to accept any more complicated model than that of a constant ('zero effect') one. "

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...MC4679206/
Conclusion:
"The EPA action level for reducing radon in homes is 4 pCi/L (150 Bq/m3). This limit is 14 times lower than the NOAEL of 2100 Bq/m3 estimated in this article. The very low action level has been causing undue fear and unwarranted costs to many homeowners as well as a reduction in the market prices of their radon-stigmatized homes. It should also be noted that radon remediation significantly increases lung cancer mortality, as shown in Figure 3. To dispel the fear and eliminate this economic burden, the action level should be raised by a factor of at least 7 to about 1000 Bq/m3 (27 pCi/L), where the health benefit is near optimum."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...MC3315166/
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
"Beware of association studies between lung cancer and radon because they do not prove causality! Finding an increase in lung cancer risk with increasing residential radon exposure for exposure levels just above the EPA's action level (approximately 150 Bq m−3) does not prove that the increased risk was caused by damage from alpha radiation from radon progeny. The increase appears to be due to a loss of radon ANP against smoking and other causes of lung cancer."
You are correct. If the $20 test says you have low radon, then you don't need this. If the $20 test says you have high radon, and you have it remediated, you don't need this.
If you enjoy watching your radon level go up and down, then this is essential,
I once found out my radon fan was broken by seeing my radon level spike. That didn't justify the $125 I paid for it, but it is nice to have.
I alway recommend to get something like Radon Eye RD200 which can log the data on your phone app. It is nice to have chronological data since the radon level can vary based on the season or weather. I see high increase in radon when the ground freezes in winter or there are snow storms.

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#3
Amazon deal of the day. Reviews seem pretty good if your expectations aren't extreme accuracy/precision (which they shouldn't be for a $100 unit). Seems like it has good long term and short term tracking functionality.
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Last edited by ulemu06 January 27, 2021 at 03:55 AM.
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#4
Great deal. Unit seems to be accurate. Needs a day to output a result (normal).
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#5
Yes it's a good deal. I bought this last week for $150, but I returned it because I was looking for the one to show me the Radon levels on my phone and Alexa. This one you have to go physically go to the unit and check. Experts correct me if I'm wrong
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#6
Wow I was just looking at this yesterday and it was $150. This is about as low as these units get. Good deal.
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#7
Excellent deal this works well.

I use this and a radon eye which charts the levels and has an app that can check by Bluetooth.
Highly recommend either.
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#8
I alway recommend to get something like Radon Eye RD200 which can log the data on your phone app. It is nice to have chronological data since the radon level can vary based on the season or weather. I see high increase in radon when the ground freezes in winter or there are snow storms.
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#9
From my own ignorance, what's the residential use case for this? Been a while since I looked but I thought big box store radon test kits were cheap ($20?) and if you detect radon you should get a system installed?
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#10
For anyone that's interested in recent research regarding the standards and how they're derived.

There's no question that Radon increases the rate of lung cancer. There is, however, disagreement on what the normal acceptable level is and the model used to come up with that number.

I'm obviously not an expert so, if you're interested, I recommend you do your own research and form your own conclusions.

http://www.forensic-applications....radon.html
Very detailed and well sourced counter argument.


https://academic.oup.com/jrr/arti...49/4654992
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
"No statistical evidence could support the thesis that the linear model best fits the data over low radon concentrations. We have arrived at an opposite view, supported by several arguments, namely that the linear relationship has typically been pre-assumed in such analyses and that it should be discarded. The data are statistically too weak to accept any more complicated model than that of a constant ('zero effect') one. "

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...MC4679206/
Conclusion:
"The EPA action level for reducing radon in homes is 4 pCi/L (150 Bq/m3). This limit is 14 times lower than the NOAEL of 2100 Bq/m3 estimated in this article. The very low action level has been causing undue fear and unwarranted costs to many homeowners as well as a reduction in the market prices of their radon-stigmatized homes. It should also be noted that radon remediation significantly increases lung cancer mortality, as shown in Figure 3. To dispel the fear and eliminate this economic burden, the action level should be raised by a factor of at least 7 to about 1000 Bq/m3 (27 pCi/L), where the health benefit is near optimum."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...MC3315166/
Excerpt from the Conclusion:
"Beware of association studies between lung cancer and radon because they do not prove causality! Finding an increase in lung cancer risk with increasing residential radon exposure for exposure levels just above the EPA's action level (approximately 150 Bq m−3) does not prove that the increased risk was caused by damage from alpha radiation from radon progeny. The increase appears to be due to a loss of radon ANP against smoking and other causes of lung cancer."
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#11
Great deal. I got one of these just before we got a radon mitigation system installed to get an idea of the level fluxuation in our basement since the kits only give you an average for the exposure over like 2 days. I've been running it ever since just to keep an eye on the short and long term averages. Love it.
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#12
Quote from modestDeals
:
From my own ignorance, what's the residential use case for this? Been a while since I looked but I thought big box store radon test kits were cheap ($20?) and if you detect radon you should get a system installed?
You are correct. If the $20 test says you have low radon, then you don't need this. If the $20 test says you have high radon, and you have it remediated, you don't need this.
If you enjoy watching your radon level go up and down, then this is essential,
I once found out my radon fan was broken by seeing my radon level spike. That didn't justify the $125 I paid for it, but it is nice to have.
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#13
Quote from ram71
:
This one you have to go physically go to the unit and check. Experts correct me if I'm wrong
You are correct. There's no off device connectivity to anything with this model.
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#14
I have radon mitigation system installed by previous owner. Do I still need this ?
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#15
Quote from modestDeals
:
From my own ignorance, what's the residential use case for this? Been a while since I looked but I thought big box store radon test kits were cheap ($20?) and if you detect radon you should get a system installed?
This continually monitors radon in your atmosphere. The radon test kits you use once then mail it in. This will continue to test forever and ever. Radon levels can change season to season and based on lots of other factors.
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