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Generator Ultra Quiet 2200/1800 Full featured low THD CARB compliant 52dBA includes parallel cables $100 OFF -OUT OF STOCK EXPIRED

$700.00
+15 Deal Score
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OUT OF STOCK EXPIRED

Ultra-Quiet 52dBA Inverter Generator with Mobility Kit (CARB Compliant)

Fuel-Saver mode automatic idle-down, parallel-ready, RV ready with adapter
2,300 starting watts / 1,800 running watts
79cc OHV4-cycle engine
Low THD and 52dBA quiet operation
Digital fuel gauge, power meter and data center
Handle carry or tote with built-in wheels and full retractable telescopic handle
51 lbs
California Air Resourced Board (CARB) compliant
Created 02-25-2021 at 10:58 AM by timbertop
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Deal
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+15
29,663 Views
$700.00

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Last Edited by timbertop February 27, 2021 at 12:19 AM
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Joined Feb 2013
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#31
Quote from ironman69 :
After a lot of research, I went with this one, the GN400i. It is being delivered today, actually, along with the magnetic dipstick.
That's a lot of generator for the money. I'd be interested to see what you think of it when you get it. BTW, there are videos on YT of guys doing various experiments to quiet down the open frame generators. One video I saw the guy just took some plywood and leaned it up against the generator facing down and it made it a lot quieter.
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#32
Quote from 80is :
i have a relative who lives in texas, he told me that everyone is out to buy a generator . . . despite that the hard freeze is only every 30-40 years.
Interestingly I'm more worried about the outages during the summer. We have already reached brownouts 3 winters and about 3 summers since I've lived in Texas (about 15 years). Further capacity is going off the grid due to coal not being competitive on cost and pollution. It's not getting better here anytime soon.

We had brownouts last summer when it wasn't that hot. A summer like the one a decade or so back where we had 60+ days with > 100f temps will leave us without power. There is no way the windmills stay producing for all 60 days and we heavily rely on them during load.
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#33
Quote from 80is :
i have a relative who lives in texas, he told me that everyone is out to buy a generator . . . despite that the hard freeze is only every 30-40 years.

Everyone is shitting on TX but that's what it boils down to - preparation is expensive and often wasted - They could spend a ton of money to winterize their infrastructure..... for it to "pay back" a couple times a century. Or, NOT make that investment and deal with it. Have you ever seen when it snows in the mid south like SC to GA? Not uncommon for those states to be practically crippled by a tiny amount of snow us in New England would laugh at - but what's the flip side? Does GA invest in enough snow plows to plow the whole state every few decades? It just plain doesn't make sense. Or, up here when we get a tropical storm (not even a hurricane) and are out of power for a week+ - yeah we could bury all our power lines and basically eliminate the issue (or clearcut trees I guess), but at what cost for what benefit? The fact that the power company seems to have no issue paying a ton of OT to crews from all over the US when that happens should tell you how long a payback even burying only major lines would be.

But at some point there is a level of personal responsibility to have. I'm frankly shocked that more people down there (TX) don't already have generators, especially apparently gas stations - while they may not get snow often, they get a lot of heat and their fair share of legit hurricanes (gulf coast at least).
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#34
Quote from 80is :
i have a relative who lives in texas, he told me that everyone is out to buy a generator . . . despite that the hard freeze is only every 30-40 years.
Nope laugh out loudlaugh out loudlaugh out loudlaugh out loud
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#35
Quote from Dr. J :
Everyone is shitting on TX but that's what it boils down to - preparation is expensive and often wasted - They could spend a ton of money to winterize their infrastructure..... for it to "pay back" a couple times a century. Or, NOT make that investment and deal with it. Have you ever seen when it snows in the mid south like SC to GA? Not uncommon for those states to be practically crippled by a tiny amount of snow us in New England would laugh at - but what's the flip side? Does GA invest in enough snow plows to plow the whole state every few decades? It just plain doesn't make sense. Or, up here when we get a tropical storm (not even a hurricane) and are out of power for a week+ - yeah we could bury all our power lines and basically eliminate the issue (or clearcut trees I guess), but at what cost for what benefit? The fact that the power company seems to have no issue paying a ton of OT to crews from all over the US when that happens should tell you how long a payback even burying only major lines would be.

But at some point there is a level of personal responsibility to have. I'm frankly shocked that more people down there (TX) don't already have generators, especially apparently gas stations - while they may not get snow often, they get a lot of heat and their fair share of legit hurricanes (gulf coast at least).
You need to be "shocked" you don't need a generator. I think they will sell more generators when they make them quieter. Lost power for a day. $83 dollar electric bill for the month. OP's deal does look solid, but I can't help but think there may be some great deals when they have to clearance the leftover inventory.
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Last edited by Dealzcat February 26, 2021 at 11:07 AM.
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#36
Quote from Dealzcat :
You need to be "shocked" you don't need a generator. I think they will sell more generators when they make them quieter. Lost power for a day. $83 dollar electric bill for the month. OP's deal does look solid, but I can't help but think there may be some great deals when they have to clearance the leftover inventory.
Just buy an inverter, but for a whole house application it's going to be $$$$. I would have installed a full standby (like 20kW+) years ago if I already had propane (or better yet NG) at my place but I don't, and I don't feel like installing some huge tumor (tank) on the side of my garage for an event that is pretty rare, in the grand scheme of things (but propane does practically last forever)

On a 5500/8250 we can basically live "normal" with the exception of no 240V devices at all - even the smallest burner on my range makes the 5500 bog down like mad, and my AC even thought it's only around 3.5kw running, the inrush trips the generator. Lights, TV's, well pump, septic pump, microwave, refrig, PC's, all the IOT, etc all OK on that 5500.

I did upgrade to a 7/9kw unit last fall, just to avoid the higher end of the kW, but I still don't think it will run my AC.
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#37
Quote from Dr. J :
Just buy an inverter, but for a whole house application it's going to be $$$$. I would have installed a full standby (like 20kW+) years ago if I already had propane (or better yet NG) at my place but I don't, and I don't feel like installing some huge tumor (tank) on the side of my garage for an event that is pretty rare, in the grand scheme of things (but propane does practically last forever)

On a 5500/8250 we can basically live "normal" with the exception of no 240V devices at all - even the smallest burner on my range makes the 5500 bog down like mad, and my AC even thought it's only around 3.5kw running, the inrush trips the generator. Lights, TV's, well pump, septic pump, microwave, refrig, PC's, all the IOT, etc all OK on that 5500.

I did upgrade to a 7/9kw unit last fall, just to avoid the higher end of the kW, but I still don't think it will run my AC.
Agree, I think the only thing for me that would be realistic would be an inverter fueled by natural gas. My guess would be that would require the least amount of maintenance and effort on my part once installed. (I am not willing to do a conversion kit, so that limits my options) You obviously have put in the effort and done your homework and are smarter than the average bear. However, I don't think most of the buyers have thought about the reality of actually being able to use this when you need it. (Properly storing fuel, adding fuel, getting fuel etc)
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#38
.....
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Last edited by timbertop February 27, 2021 at 12:21 AM.
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#39
I got one of these last time they were on sale here for $250.

The first one I got was dead on arrival. No matter what I tried, the engine wouldn't start. I ended up contacting Sam's Club and they sent me another one and I returned the defective one at my local store.

The second one worked just fine. Though occasionally when I sometimes first start it up when cold, the inverter will go into some kind of "error" mode and not put out any power. Simply turning the engine off and starting it back up has always fixed this.
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#40
Quote from timbertop :
For some AC is a necessity. If it helps to know your gens should run the largest portable and window units.

Have you tried a portable induction cook top? Old ones are better than the new ones and you can find them cheap. Should weight 5-7 lbs and have a minimum 10 wattage settings. We do plenty of cooking set 200- 400 watts. Good cookware is a necessity. Instant pot is a 1000 watts but cooks much faster. We rarely use the 240V for cooking anymore.

There are are quite a few open frame 240V gens out now 4500 - 5500 watts for less than five bills even with current pricing. For us the 240V well pump is critical. Nice to have 240V water heater for sanitation too. I agree the 7,500w are a sweet spot especially with remote electric start. These inverter gens can take up the slack when not pumping.

For cooking we just use the grill (or sidecar with burner) or grab quick stuff - this is for backup use only, it;s not like I'm living in a cabin without reasonable access to utilities, so for a few days I can grab muffins or whatnot for breakfast, we're all gone during the day and for night grabbing a pizza or whatever a few times isn't a dealbreaker.

The well pump is a must - 10 years ago when we had our first major outage we were the only house in the 18 unit culdesac that had a generator - our place was the hotspot for showers that week, but by now most people have generators.

I don't know about the HWH though - ours is oil fired (seems to be an anomaly but it's been a great unit and we have HHO for heat anyway) - seems a "light duty" 50 gal electric one is 9kW by itself. Even the point of use (e.g. small) ones are near 5kW. Neither is really suitable for a generator unless you have a large whole home standby. Electricity is just a really poor choice for heating just about anything.
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Joined Aug 2011
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#41
Quote from lfthrdr :
I purchased 2 of these when they were at the $250 special price. They have run well except for one of them had to have the actual generator portion replaced since it stopped making power and the other had to have the lcd readout screen replaced. Both times, I went through Ai customer service and it went smoothly. I replaced the parts myself after receiving the parts in the mail with minimal effort. I only have a few uses with each one so I was a bit surprised to have those 2 problems so soon.
I got one when they were $250....should have purchased another at that price. These have been $400 for quite some time now, which is probably still a pretty good price. I like this one because even though it's not that heavy, it has the telescoping handle and wheels.

I finally unboxed mine and used it last week when things went haywire here in Texas. It worked fine, but I can appreciate your comments on how things can possibly break (and how AiPower's customer service is decent). To that end, I'm glad I picked up the Square Trade 3-year warranty, which was only $20 at the time. AiPower does use an actual Yamaha engine in some of their units, but I'm guessing the engine in this one is a Yammy clone--a good design.
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#42
Quote from 17FiST300 :
Exactly right. Electric heating is not efficient at all. Running an electric heater to just heat a single room every night can add $300 to your monthly electric bill!!
I agree, my house has electric heat and my winter electric bills here in Texas are more than my summer bills when the AC runs all day. Electric heat pulls major wattage.

I've been working from home since COVID-19 became a thing. I run a small space heater by my desk when it's cold outside, and my electric bill has gone up about $50 from last year due to it. I think that little thing pulls 1500 watts. When the power went out last week, I didn't even bother hooking it up to my inverter because I needed to run lights/computers/fridge---all of which collectively use less juice than that space heater.
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#43
"Don't forget to open the fuel tank vent when running! Otherwise the engine will stall from vapor lock."

Uhh this is not vapor lock. Vapor lock occurs when the liquid gasoline turns into a vapor before it enters the carb or fuel injection system of gasoline engines (usually from too much heat too close to the fuel) . Not opening the vent on the fuel tank just creates a vacuum inside the tank which prevents the gasoline from leaving.
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Last edited by bwilliamsjr February 26, 2021 at 01:36 PM.
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#44
Quote from Dr. J :
Everyone is shitting on TX but that's what it boils down to - preparation is expensive and often wasted - They could spend a ton of money to winterize their infrastructure..... for it to "pay back" a couple times a century. Or, NOT make that investment and deal with it. Have you ever seen when it snows in the mid south like SC to GA? Not uncommon for those states to be practically crippled by a tiny amount of snow us in New England would laugh at - but what's the flip side? Does GA invest in enough snow plows to plow the whole state every few decades? It just plain doesn't make sense. Or, up here when we get a tropical storm (not even a hurricane) and are out of power for a week+ - yeah we could bury all our power lines and basically eliminate the issue (or clearcut trees I guess), but at what cost for what benefit? The fact that the power company seems to have no issue paying a ton of OT to crews from all over the US when that happens should tell you how long a payback even burying only major lines would be.

But at some point there is a level of personal responsibility to have. I'm frankly shocked that more people down there (TX) don't already have generators, especially apparently gas stations - while they may not get snow often, they get a lot of heat and their fair share of legit hurricanes (gulf coast at least).
It is called buying an Insurance vs being ready to pay out of pocket. I am sure you buy insurance for car/house/ etc. Everyone buying their own generator is a Tax too.
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#45
Quote from 80is :
i have a relative who lives in texas, he told me that everyone is out to buy a generator . . . despite that the hard freeze is only every 30-40 years.
In terms of probability these extreme events are Random events (approx). Which means next one might happen next year or may happen in 30 years. Who knows. These events are not predictable. With changes in climate these events might happen more often. Last major winter blackout happened just 10 years ago, so definitely not 30.
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