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100' Cables Direct Online Cat6 Ethernet Network Patch Cable (White) EXPIRED

$12.50
$26.95
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Cables-Direct-Online via Amazon has 100' Cables Direct Online Cat6 Ethernet Network Patch Cable (White) on sale for $12.50 when you follow directions below. Shipping is free with Prime or on orders $25+.

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About this Product:
  • Cat6 - 4 Stranded UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) - Copper Clad Aluminum (CCA)
  • Meets all Cat6 TIA/EIA-568-B-2.1, draft 9 standards
  • Certified Transfer Rate: 10/100/1000 mbps (1000Base-T Gigabit)
  • Enhanced 550Mhz bandwidth for high-speed Data\Audio\Video and handle other intensive applications bandwidth.
  • Gold plated connectors to insure a clean and clear transmission.
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Edited March 30, 2021 at 02:32 PM by
clip $5 coupon
lowest price i could find for a 100ft cable on amazon

https://www.amazon.com/100FT-Netw...cs&sr=1-20

https://www.amazon.com/100FT-Netw...cs&sr=1-20
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$12.50
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47 Comments

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#31
Quote from Preon :
This was my only question.

Mods: could you add "CCA" to the title.

For those who don't know, you shouldn't use CCA for PoE because it can't carry as
Quote from jamestechman :
Today...I have learned more about cat 5 cables to last a lifetime.
Was about to post the same thing. Great post just for the responces!
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that sounds about right..
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#32
So based on all the feedback here, what is this cable even good for? Would it be ok for the occasional "I have to connect my raspberry pi to my router 50 ft away for a few minutes"? Doesn't seem like this would be what you'd want with PoE, or permanent connection with things that you really need constant, reliable, consistent connection, right?
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#33
Quote from crackerjeffbox :
If it's 100ft is it really a patch cable at that point?
essentially all cables are patch cables. Patch cable just refers to a cable connecting two electronic pieces for exchanging data. A non patch cable would be a hardwired non-detachable cable to a device.
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Last edited by samsus March 30, 2021 at 12:25 PM.
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#34
I used copper clad aluminum before I knew anything about it for a bunch of POE Reolink cameras. I have some a couple 50 foot runs and no issues whatsoever. However these are runs inside the walls and they won't ever be moved.
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#35
Yeah... comment section WAYYY above my pay grade. Can someone just tell me if this is the proper (Cat 6) cable to use for my new TV?

My (Xfinity) speed is 200mbps and I was thinking of running ethernet out to the living room instead of having to relocate the router (which would require longer coax). Only need about 30'... Ok to leave the "excess" coiled up?
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#36
Quote from hackmaxjr :
I used copper clad aluminum before I knew anything about it for a bunch of POE Reolink cameras. I have some a couple 50 foot runs and no issues whatsoever. However these are runs inside the walls and they won't ever be moved.
It can work. The issue is aluminum has more resistance, and thus it heats up more. It's the reason aluminum 120v house wiring was tried, and abandoned, in the 1970s - it caused fires in rare instances.

So, your POE cables may run a little hotter, but don't worry - you're not drawing much juice. Any impact on signal speed will not be noticeable in a POE camera.
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#37
You're getting less than what you're paying for with these cables - read reviews on Amazon before splurging.
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#38
Is this ok or should I get cat8?? I need stable connection without disconnecting
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#39
Quote from elefante72 :
If you are going outside at any point unless you know what you are doing you can get into trouble. Minimally you want wet rated and uv jacketed (cmx), but also if you go outside you have to bond that interface properly because if you have a near lightning strike you can destroy equipment and or electrocute people. You should also do a drip loop. People think behind siding is dry and free of uv, nope. Running conductive cable outside is dangerous.

As people have noted aluminum is almost never seen in home wiring anymore for a reason, it sucks as a proper conductor and oxidizes. Theoretically the copper clad reduces but cmon this is cheap and a good lightning strike will set the side of your house on fire too.

Cable is cheap enough, pls stay away from cca. And its not cat or ul certified either, and dont run poe over it.

This listing should be removed because it is misrepresented and false. No hit to poster, but cant believe amazon doesnt flag this.
Quote from ph7 :
It can work. The issue is aluminum has more resistance, and thus it heats up more. It's the reason aluminum 120v house wiring was tried, and abandoned, in the 1970s - it caused fires in rare instances.

So, your POE cables may run a little hotter, but don't worry - you're not drawing much juice. Any impact on signal speed will not be noticeable in a POE camera.
The other problem with aluminum is cracking. It is not nearly as flexible as copper, and when it cracks it oxidizes, which means it's creates quite a bit more resistance, and heats up. Now heating up can cause it to expand, hence more cracking, and in the end it's not pretty. They tried to fix the problem with set screws in harnesses (I don't know the technical name) so no bending if you handled it carefully. Except if you tightened the retaining screw too much, you get cracking, again. And of course we know how all contractors are always hyper cautious about precisely following code.

So a CCA patch cable, it you simply run it one time along it's path, never bend it too far, and it was never handled carelessly during manufacture or packaging, should be fine. That many - if/but - makes safety inspectors nervous, so they banned residential aluminum electrical wiring. POE with CCA I have a nasty suspicion is not going to pass more rigorous building codes.

I am curious about the UV and siding. I've learned all about hidden moisture problems the hard way (mold is NOT your friend) but even synthetic siding I would think would block all UV. Of course one little spot if cabling exposed to UV and you will have breached sheathing in under a year, and it is utterly amazing how much mold you can get without any obvious "leak". Mold remediation is expensive. I actually had a plastic tote from Home Depot that got about three hours mid-day sun, and had no anti-UV additives, and when I went to pick it up a year later my fingers actually punched through the plastic.
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#40
Quote from BlackstonePartner :
So based on all the feedback here, what is this cable even good for? Would it be ok for the occasional "I have to connect my raspberry pi to my router 50 ft away for a few minutes"? Doesn't seem like this would be what you'd want with PoE, or permanent connection with things that you really need constant, reliable, consistent connection, right?
Yes it's probably fine for most uses. Are you building a data center? Probably you can afford copper.
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#41
Quote from jawshoeaw :
Yes it's probably fine for most uses. Are you building a data center? Probably you can afford copper.
I live in a major city. I've got data centers all around me, selling bandwidth and processing power to all takers. Curious question - can I build my own little spec data center, and sell capacity to AWS and others? I mean, it works for solar - hook up to the grid and sell your capacity. Why not build my own little data center, minting dimes and dollars while I sleep? Maybe it needs to be scalable to be profitable - just a s expensive to run data security for my mini-data center as it is for a warehouse?
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#42
Quote from PhillyChad :
Yeah... comment section WAYYY above my pay grade. Can someone just tell me if this is the proper (Cat 6) cable to use for my new TV?

My (Xfinity) speed is 200mbps and I was thinking of running ethernet out to the living room instead of having to relocate the router (which would require longer coax). Only need about 30'... Ok to leave the "excess" coiled up?
First off DONT buy cable from Amazon, because there are so many fakes. Go to a reputable supplier like Monoprice or your local brick and mortar and get a Cat6 cable. It may cost $1-$2 more but you won't have to worry about it for decades. They are also warrantied for lifetime (not the 3 days a seller exists on Amazon).

Excess coiled up is OK, just don't zip tie it tightly and keep the loop a foot or two so that you don't put any bends or kinks in the cable.

$7 and free shipping from monoprice for 30 feet: https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=40879

It disgusts me that CCA is even sold.


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#43
Quote from ph7 :
It can work. The issue is aluminum has more resistance, and thus it heats up more. It's the reason aluminum 120v house wiring was tried, and abandoned, in the 1970s - it caused fires in rare instances.

So, your POE cables may run a little hotter, but don't worry - you're not drawing much juice. Any impact on signal speed will not be noticeable in a POE camera.
One thing also not mentioned (and this is what caused a ton of fires w/ aluminum) is that the CONNECTORS were designed for copper to copper transitions. When you slice CCA radially the clamping force will have a copper to aluminum interface which requires special connectors which cost WAY more than just using pure copper. These connectors NEVER have the copper and AL touch and are made of stainless steel so that to isolate the metal differences.

Listen just go to monoprice or get bent at BBY to the like and get real cable and spend the extra $1 and get a lifetime warranty. There is ZERO reason to take the additional risk of not using the proper cable with UL/Cat certification today.
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#44
Quote from Mr. Harley :
The other problem with aluminum is cracking. It is not nearly as flexible as copper, and when it cracks it oxidizes, which means it's creates quite a bit more resistance, and heats up. Now heating up can cause it to expand, hence more cracking, and in the end it's not pretty. They tried to fix the problem with set screws in harnesses (I don't know the technical name) so no bending if you handled it carefully. Except if you tightened the retaining screw too much, you get cracking, again. And of course we know how all contractors are always hyper cautious about precisely following code.

So a CCA patch cable, it you simply run it one time along it's path, never bend it too far, and it was never handled carelessly during manufacture or packaging, should be fine. That many - if/but - makes safety inspectors nervous, so they banned residential aluminum electrical wiring. POE with CCA I have a nasty suspicion is not going to pass more rigorous building codes.

I am curious about the UV and siding. I've learned all about hidden moisture problems the hard way (mold is NOT your friend) but even synthetic siding I would think would block all UV. Of course one little spot if cabling exposed to UV and you will have breached sheathing in under a year, and it is utterly amazing how much mold you can get without any obvious "leak". Mold remediation is expensive. I actually had a plastic tote from Home Depot that got about three hours mid-day sun, and had no anti-UV additives, and when I went to pick it up a year later my fingers actually punched through the plastic.
TL;DR - The sweet spot for cable and longevity today is Cat 6(a) at 500+ MHz that is listed w/ the UL. Those cables can be purchased at Monoprice cheaply and have a lifetime warranty, or at your local BM. Don't buy ethernet cables (or any if you can) from Amazon. Even if you are buying from a reputable seller I have seen folks get CCA or fakes because of commingling in their DC. The last thing you want it to run a fake behind your wall and have an issue or a fire. YMMV.

If you go outside never use CM/CMR (riser) or CMP (plenum) which are 99% of cables on the internet. If you are interested CMP should be used if you are running cables in HVAC and the like and CMR is typically your patch cables, going from floor to floor. The (R) flame resistant the jacket is slow burn and in CMP uses different jacket made for plenums (HVAC/ducts) and have better static properties however codes are more restrictive and it costs more. Most people will never use CMP. So CM/CMR is what 99% of the folks will use inside.

Outside there are a number of cables but for the most part there are two that one takes into consideration.

CMX - This has wet and UV properties and the sheath is built for greater ranges of temperature. Anytime a cable goes outside a conditioned space you should use this (and lots of people don't but hey). Wet does NOT equal submerged or buried. It means rain or humidity. Some can be buried underground so YMMV. Read on.

UB/DB - Underground burial - This is special cable and it often has a tracer wire (so one can run a detector to find it) and has a grease in it to protect from water intrusion and is designed to be buried underground. This should be professionally run because the ends of the connectors or gooey and it's a pain to terminate (unless you buy ready-made). I would recommend this for anything under 12 inches above ground, but this is overtly overcautious.


For in the house Cat 6 cable is the cheapest right now (even cheaper that Cat5e). Now if you care, there are two cables normally sold for Cat 6 (Cat 6 and Cat6a) which many times won't be listed, however if you look at the BANDWIDTH 250 Mhz is Cat 6 and 500+ MHz is Cat6a-ish this will allow greater speeds over time. The cost differential between the two is minimal and I recommend get 500 MHz+ if possible as you will be able to run 10 gig or greater so we are talking decades of lifespan.

The problem w/ this listing is there is ZERO way this cable is rated at 500 MHz, it is a fat out LIE. These guys will say anything to make a sale, so again use a REPUTABLE vendor, and I tend to stay away from Amazon because even in good stock you can see fakes get mixed in and if you are putting this behind your wall do you want to take a chance of failure for $1 and burn down your house? Cut out a latte, and you are good for the next 20 years.

Also if you are putting in connectors make 100% sure the connectors are for the Cat that you are getting - Cat 5 goes to Cat 5 connectors, Cat6, Cat 7 because the wire gauges (radial thickness) are different and you won't terminate properly and can have issues. So say don't mix a Cat 5e connector with a Cat 6 wire. or visa versa.
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Last edited by elefante72 March 31, 2021 at 08:23 AM.

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#45
Quote from elefante72 :
One thing also not mentioned (and this is what caused a ton of fires w/ aluminum) is that the CONNECTORS were designed for copper to copper transitions. When you slice CCA radially the clamping force will have a copper to aluminum interface which requires special connectors which cost WAY more than just using pure copper. These connectors NEVER have the copper and AL touch and are made of stainless steel so that to isolate the metal differences.

Listen just go to monoprice or get bent at BBY to the like and get real cable and spend the extra $1 and get a lifetime warranty. There is ZERO reason to take the additional risk of not using the proper cable with UL/Cat certification today.
Thanks hadn't thought of galvinic corrosion. I will only use (R) rated cable, my sister was severely burned as a kid. Ditto for CCA. Great intro for baisc cabling!
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