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DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner EXPIRED

$779
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Home Depot has DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner & Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter w/ WiFi (DA1221-H2) for $779. Shipping is free.

Thanks to community member david3808 for finding this deal.

Included:
  • Copper tubing w/ insulation and nuts
  • Control wire
  • 6' drain hose
  • Wall sleeve
  • Wall sleeve cover and tape
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Edited May 22, 2021 at 05:15 PM by
Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars on Home Depot (931 reviews)
Pre-charged condenser for the DIYers

2 part installation video.
part 1: https://youtu.be/iFBmh29GezU
part 2: https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw

part 2 walks you through checking lines for leaks and vacuuming:
https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw?t=516

Installation Manual - page 29 has the Air Evacuation instructions:
https://ductlessaire.com/wp-conte...lation.pdf

15% to 28% off
$697 - 21 SEER 9, 000 BTU 0.75 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump - 230-Volt/60 Hz OOS
$779 - 21 SEER 12,000 BTU 1 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$999 - 19 SEER 24000 BTU 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220-Volt
$1019 - 21 SEER 18,000 BTU 1.5 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$1199 - 21 SEER 24,000 BTU Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz

https://www.homedepot.com/Special...uyOfTheDay
  • 21.5 SEER rating ENERGY STAR certified: estimated national average annual operating cooling cost is 70 USD based on AHRI certificate #9150138
  • Package includes: stylishly designed interior white wall-mount air handler with LED display; exterior pre-charged condenser with special golden anti-corrosive coating coils; wireless remote control for customizable airflow and temperature adjustment; 25 ft. complete kit
  • 25 ft. kit includes: copper tubing with insulation and nuts, control wire, 6 ft. drain hose, wall sleeve, wall sleeve cover and tape
  • Electroplated coils: the electroplated hydrophilic coils improve heating efficiency by accelerating the defrosting process; the unique anti-corrosive coating on the coils also aids in withstanding the effects of salty air, rain and other corrosive elements by allowing contaminated water on the coils to run off more quickly, reducing the corrosive effect to the coils; heat exchange performance is much longer lasting
  • Low ambient operation: a special built-in low ambient kit can be used in temperatures as low as 5°F for cooling operation, useful for users who need to maintain cooling during winter
  • Refrigerant leak detection: with this new technology, the system will alarm when a refrigerant leak is detected
  • Dual sensor fixed or remote: by switching to remote sensor and keeping the remote close to you, you tell the air conditioner to set the temperature from wherever the remote happens to be, this counteracts the tendency for the air conditioner to stop cooling or heating because the air around the unit has reached its set temperature (switches off after period of inactivity to preserve battery life)
  • HEPA filter included (1): a HEPA filter is a type of mechanical air filter; it works by forcing air through a fine mesh that traps harmful particles such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites and tobacco smoke
  • 2-direction air vane technology: in cooling mode the air vane opens counterclockwise to direct air horizontally, allowing for an even cooling effect; in heating mode the air vane opens clockwise, directing air downward, this time for a uniform heating effect
  • Built-in electronic diagnostic: monitoring some abnormal operations or parts failures, microcomputer of the air conditioner will switch off and protect the system automatically; meanwhile, the error or protection code will be displayed on the indoor unit
  • Outdoor pan heater: a heating belt is fitted on the base plate of the outdoor unit to avoid accumulation of rain, snow or water on the base plate
  • Dual washable filters: a good air conditioner should not only take care of the temperature in your home but also the quality of the air you breathe; the system aids in removing most of the pollen dust, smoke and other microscopic airborne particles that by latest thinking contribute to respiratory problems like asthma and hay fever
  • Self-cleaning: by pressing clean on the remote control, it automatically cleans the evaporator to aid in reducing buildup of bacteria and keeps the air fresh
  • Sleep mode: in sleep mode, the unit automatically decreases the heating or increases the cooling by 1° per hour for the first 2 hours of use, then holds the temperature steady for 5 hours before ceasing
  • Low noise airflow system: without decreasing the airflow volume and capacity output, the large-diameter cross flow fan can bring down the indoor unit noise level by lowering the fan speed
  • Anti-cold draft: if the unit is turned on in heat mode when the ambient temperature is low, it will warm up prior to fan operation to prevent cold air in heating mode
  • Louver position memory: the set louver position is stored in memory by the microcomputer and the louver returns to the stored position when the next operation is performed
  • Turbo mode: this function enables the unit to reach the preset temperature in the shortest time
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Deal
Score
+57
70,568 Views
$779
Questions & Answers BETA
Balayya_Fan asked this question on 05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.

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Joined Aug 2013
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#151
Quote from dvpatel :
Yeah. Lots of misinformation including your's.

The Mr. Cool units do not have anything in the linesets either. The only difference is the Mr. Cool linesets are vacuumed and sealed and have valves which open up when you connect them. So, you do not need to vacuum the Mr. Cool units. The rest of the lot has open lines and once you connect them, you still have to vacuum the lines regardless of if you cut them or not.

The reason Mr. Cool lines can't be cut is because of the special valves at each end which keep the lines sealed during shipment.
MrCool DIY linesets aren't vacuumed. They come precharged with the exact amount of refrigerant, down to the ounce, for that particular length. Otherwise you would have to weigh in a charge for every lineset you added.
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#152
Quote from geekwithoutacause :
I don't recall seeing the coils needing to sit horizontal in the mrcool documentation. Are you sure?
you always have to lay the extra coil horizontal, it's in the manual somewhere. If you don't you run the risk of oil sitting in the bottom of the loops instead of returning to the compressor; and no oil is very bad. There can be other issues as well. Though sometimes you are required to have an oil trap, but that's not the same as having extra coils.
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#153
Quote from PlanetoftheMapes :
It's not flat-out illegal, this is a case where "it depends". You can use the main breaker as a feeder circuit and split the circuit down the line to serve both units IF and ONLY IF the breaker has the capacity to serve both of the units AND you properly fuse the disconnects for the downstream units.
This is a good answer. I've never seen an AHJ nix this unless there were other devices that they didn't want on there. I'm pretty sure the NEC doesn't require you to match the feeder conductor ampacity (wire size) to the main breaker either, but I'd have to check. Of course the AHJ might require it. (HVAC is one of the few times you can use a larger breaker than normal. You might use a 30-40 amp breaker with 12 gauge wire; it's all up to the HVAC equipment manufacturer)
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Joined May 2004
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#154
Quote from BENJAMINB1246 :
Last time I checked, installing a computer motherboard isn't regulated by the govt. HVAC on the otherhand is regulated. These companies have the right to require that their equipment be installed how they say according to govt and industry standards, and one way of insuring this is to require authorized installers. Even the FTC says this when they say manufacturers can't require you to "use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact". "Specified service providers" doesn't mean that anyone and everyone is allowed to be a service provider; it just means the warranty can't require you to use a particular service provider out of all the eligible service providers.

I also don't think you understand how easy it is to destroy a unit ir the diagnostic criteria that goes into HVAC. More often than not, a tech won't even know the exact cause for defect in a part. And what do you think happens when the part is sent back to the manufacturer? Do you really think they're going to know if it was installed improperly? It's not easy or cheap to tear apart a compressor. They'll know why it doesn't work, but they'll probably won't be able to figure out what caused the malfunction.

Not sure why people keep bringing this stuff up. It's not like any of this warranty stuff is new. It was in place before, and hasn't changed since the Act was passed 45 yrs ago. Do people really think these companies have blatantly been violating the Act for almost a half a century with no one catching on? Come-on, think about.
I think you are right that it just means they can't require you to use particular service providers. Re-reading the actual text of Magnuson-Moss, it only says warrantors can't condition the warranty on articles or services identified by brand, trade, or corporate name. It looks like they are okay here since they haven't used a brand, trade, or corporate name. Actually, this particular product's warranty might not be fully in compliance. It did say a NATE certification would be acceptable in areas where licensing isn't required, and "NATE" is a corporate name. But, indeed, it appears Magnuson-Moss doesn't prohibit requiring a licensed installer.

From Magnuson-Moss:
Quote :
Prohibition on conditions for written or implied warranty; waiver by Commission. No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumer's using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade, or corporate name.
The interpretation I quoted before from the FTC's site saying companies can't deny warranty coverage for using someone not authorized to perform service is misleading. The act's actual text implies companies can deny warranty coverage for using someone not authorized to perform service as long as the warranty doesn't identify who is authorized by brand, trade, or corporate name.

I do have some familiarity with the causes of failures in HVAC systems and what happens when parts are sent back to the manufacturer under warranty. One of the most interesting things about returned compressors is that a large percentage of them aren't actually defective [compressorsunlimited.com]. These are presumably professional licensed contractors who return perfectly good compressors about a third of the time. Magnuson-Moss aside, I think it's unfortunate that a manufacturer is willing to deal with a licensed jackleg who can't even tell if a compressor is good or bad on warranties but not the end user who is the person who actually owns and uses the equipment. But 99% of consumers don't care, so I'm sure that's the way it will stay.

Manufacturers do tend to inspect expensive components like compressors that are returned more often than you might think. The likelihood is fairly high that they will tear down a compressor that is replaced more than once from the same piece of equipment under warranty. The likelihood of two compressors failing in the same piece of equipment from a manufacturing defect in the compressor is less than a person's likelihood of getting struck by lightning. If they can ascertain the failure was not caused by a manufacturing defect, there's a good chance they will refuse to reimburse the contractor. In a lot of cases, they actually can determine why a compressor failed and if it was a manufacturing defect. Different causes of failures leave some pretty telltale signs. This document [mechanicalsupply.com] gives some good examples. I think it's fascinating what can be divined from failed compressors in particular. I liken it to what the NTSB can tell from aircraft wreckage.

Given the way so many companies have openly violated Magnuson-Moss (e.g. the infamous warranty void stickers) for long periods of time, I wouldn't have been all that surprised if these warranties had actually been in violation. I guess the class action lawyers would have shown up by now, though, and made sure everyone got their coupon for $1.99 off their next equipment purchase.
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#155
Quote from BENJAMINB1246 :
Maybe you should do some research before commenting. I've been in HVAC for almost 20 yrs, have installed 100's of mini splits, and have serviced countless numbers of them. So I think I might know what I'm talking about.

1st, 12k is massive for 300 sq ft (obviously I don't know his load or what he has in there, but a quick manual j for my area puts it at about 2,000 btu's.)

2nd, almost all basements already have a high RH and when you start cooling it it gets worse unless the unit runs long enough to remove it. Short cycling will make it worse.

3rd, this is an INVERTER COMPRESSOR. You might want to read up on them. They ARE designed to run all the time. I couldn't find the exact specs for this unit, so I don't know what the minimum flow is. They also don't specify if they use some type of fuzzy control or a basic delta T. So it is possible that their lowest flow is still fairly high. But nevertheless it's designed to keep running.
https://www.anracelectrical.com.a...verter-ac/
I guess you never learned anything in 20 years then because here you go, saying 12k is big for 300 sqft yet you have no idea about all other factors like insulation windows, windows facing south, etc etc etc....

oh looky here: too much HUMIDITY left causes the room to feel clammy when your AC is too big. You claimed there is NO humidity.
https://www.sansone-ac.com/ac-too-big/

hint, focus on VARIABLE SPEED.

You need to go back to ac school.
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#156
Isn't the MrCool Advantage 12k unit essentially the same unit but cheaper than this? The DuctlessAire was $779, but the MrCool is $717. Both you have to vacuum out.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/MRCOO.../308810702

Costco did have great pricing for their 12k DIY unit that runs off of 115VAC for $1099, but those are not currently out of stock.
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#157
Quote from geekwithoutacause :
I guess you never learned anything in 20 years then because here you go, saying 12k is big for 300 sqft yet you have no idea about all other factors like insulation windows, windows facing south, etc etc etc....

oh looky here: too much HUMIDITY left causes the room to feel clammy when your AC is too big. You claimed there is NO humidity.
https://www.sansone-ac.com/ac-too-big/

hint, focus on VARIABLE SPEED.

You need to go back to ac school.
And just how long have you been licensed and worked in HVACR.

Where did I say there wasn't any humidity??? Did you not read my 2nd statement where I said most basements already have high RH and that short cycling can make it worse???

How many manual J's have you done??? If you've done even one you'd know 12K for 300 sq ft is probably grossly oversized. Especially for a basement that typically doesn't have many windows or doors or infiltration. They also generally don't have exposed walls except for the top couple of feet. You would also know that insulation in a basement mostly affects heat loss, not heat gain. But then again, you apparently didn't read my 1st statement where I said I didn't know this guys load, but provided one for my location.

Lastly, learn to do research. Do you even know what variable speed means. First you said they don't always run. Now I'm not sure what you're trying to say. Is it that they do run all the time? or that it will run like a standard A/C cycling on and off, only at a slower speed??? I only ask, because again, you didn't read my 3rd statement. I stated that I couldn't find the exact specs. But apparently you know something that no one else does. So let me ask you this. You say it's variable, so what is it's btu range? Variable inverter compressors can be 2 speed, multi speed, or completely variable. Just looking at one 12k mitsu unit has a btu range of 13.6k to 1.6k. Other units only go down to 65%, some 40%. So unless you know what its range is you have NO idea how this unit will perform. This unit also doesn't list dehumidification levels at anything other than 12K. (hint: TC and SC change as the inverter ramps up and down)
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Last edited by BENJAMINB1246 May 25, 2021 at 12:33 PM.

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#158
Quote from Deal Hound :
I think you are right that it just means they can't require you to use particular service providers. Re-reading the actual text of Magnuson-Moss, it only says warrantors can't condition the warranty on articles or services identified by brand, trade, or corporate name. It looks like they are okay here since they haven't used a brand, trade, or corporate name. Actually, this particular product's warranty might not be fully in compliance. It did say a NATE certification would be acceptable in areas where licensing isn't required, and "NATE" is a corporate name. But, indeed, it appears Magnuson-Moss doesn't prohibit requiring a licensed installer.

Yeah, I didn't see that. NATE is just testing certification (like being certified in Microsoft or something like that). IMOP it's more of a marketing gimmick (not that the testing is necessarily easy). Funny thing is, in many places to get your HVAC license all you need is insurance and your EPA cert. No other training is required. My city used require x number of hours of experience (and a test I think). The electrical license also required hours and a test (and it was a very hard test. I don't know who wrote it, but there was stuff on there that I have never once used, engineering type shit). Now they only require insurance.

And your absolute right about the compressors. We had one rep tell us that somewhere around 90% of their "failed" compressors were still good. On a good install it's either going to run forever or die fairly quickly. Compressors and capacitors can be finicky; and one guy I worked with would replace any unit that didn't run without first trying another capacitor. After he learned that a "good" capacitor isn't always good his replacement rate completely dropped.
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#159
Anyone's order shipped yet?
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#160
Quote from ctn049 :
Anyone's order shipped yet?
Yeah, received mine today via freight. Came on a pallet.
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#161
Had a system installed couple weeks ago by a local contractor for whole house for $7200 using Mitsubishi units. The contractor gave us a discount as my cousin knew them. Think these were SEER rating of 18.

2 outdoor units: MXZ-2C20NA2 and MXZ-3C24NA2
5 indoor units: 4 of GL09NA and 1 of GL12NA
Everything was installed in one day by 3 people.

Another company with similar Fujitsu units quoted us $9800 for everything.

These ductless are so much quieter than the window AC we had used the past years. Should also save lots in electrical bill this summer.
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#162
Quote from ctn049 :
Anyone's order shipped yet?
Yes, received mine on Thursday (4 days ago)
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#163
Quote from PlanetoftheMapes :
This is correct, the condensers still hold the charge in the MRCOOL DIY units as far as I'm aware and the line sets are what are vacuumed just like you said.
I called mrcool and verified that the refrigerant is in their lineset for extensions.. the first 16' is from the condenser. It is how you can still diy with extending linesets, there is a special coupler and the additional refrigerant is already included.
Don't get the DIY mrcool confused with the advantage or other models.

The conventional method if you wanted to extend it is call someone or add refrigerant yourself based on the additional lineset length, otherwise it won't cool/heat as much since it doesn't have the correct amount of refrigerant flowing around.
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#164
Quote from palindrome :
I called mrcool and verified that the refrigerant is in their lineset for extensions.. the first 16' is from the condenser. It is how you can still diy with extending linesets, there is a special coupler and the additional refrigerant is already included.
Don't get the DIY mrcool confused with the advantage or other models.

The conventional method if you wanted to extend it is call someone or add refrigerant yourself based on the additional lineset length, otherwise it won't cool/heat as much since it doesn't have the correct amount of refrigerant flowing around.
Yes, if someone feels uncomfortable with doing a standard HVAC install then the DIY MRCOOL units are a good option for them.
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#165
Quote from Bboy486 :
Facing north. 2-car. I'm going to try it and see if it helps at all
We have an 18000 Mitusbishi in our 2 car garage in Palm Springs. When it was 122 out a week or so ago, it kept the garage at 83 degrees. The remote control thermostat isn't the most accurate on this, so I keep it set at 84, and the temp I see across the garage is between 80 and 82.
Our garage door faces west, so I painted it white a year ago, and that made a big difference. It is a steel door that I added the insulating panels to. We also insulated the ceiling when the mini split was installed. It is a finished garage, one half is storage and workshop, the other half is where we park our electric car, so that was the reason for having the AC. Water heater, central AC and solar inverter are all in there too, and two of them give off heat.

I questioned whether the 18000 would handle the garage, but they told me it would, and if it didn't, they would upgrade it to the 24000. Two years in, and it has been great.

When we pull the car in after it has been out in the heat for hours, the unit ramps up and I haven't seen it go above 85 in there for about an hour. The car is plugged in at that point and running its AC unit to cool down the battery pack and electronics as well, so it is pumping heat into the garage and the mini-split is transferring it outside.

It did cost $4,000 for the unit to be installed with a new electric ciruit run to it, a trench to run the lines under ground to the outdoor unit, and the insulation in the ceiling. We could have gotten a Samsung for $200 less, or a Daiken for $1000 more. But, wanted the Mitsubishi. Wish I had a couple of them to cool the house, or at least the bedroom at night instead of running the 5 ton beast!
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