Sorry, this deal has expired. Get notified of deals like this in the future. Add Deal Alert for this Item
Popular Deal

UGREEN Cat 8 Ethernet Cable 6FT 40Gbps 2000Mhz High Speed $5.24 + Free Shipping w/ Amazon Prime or Orders $25+

$5.24
+33 Deal Score
27,197 Views
UGREEN via Amazon [amazon.com] has Cat 8 Ethernet Cable 6FT 40Gbps 2000Mhz High Speed for $5.24. Shipping is Free w/ Amazon Prime or Orders $25+.
  • Promo code UGREENSD102 for all deals below
UGREEN Cat 7 Ethernet Cable 10FT [amazon.com] for $5.24

UGREEN Cat 7 Ethernet Cable 6FT [amazon.com] for $5.24
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to JZ1989 for this post.
Thank you!
JZ1989 posted this deal. Say thanks!
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Frontpage Deal
Frontpage Deal
Frontpage Deal
Frontpage Deal
$720 Off Another
w/ New Line Added
116 1498
Deal
Score
+33
27,197 Views
$5.24
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.
Questions & Answers BETA
sinn78 asked this question on 06-10-2021 at 10:20 AM
06-10-2021 at 02:55 PM
You will need a couple rj45 to rj11 adapters for each end. Or you could just buy the correct cable instead.
Wallaee957 asked this question on 06-10-2021 at 10:20 AM

70 Comments

1 2 3 4 5
Post to Q&A to get a quicker answer to your question!

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Apr 2017
L2: Beginner
256 Posts
46 Reputation
#46
Quote from necrodiety :
I have ATT fiber (1gb asymetric). I can tell you that the ATT installers are using plain ol cat 5e for their modem runs. I watched the guy pull it. From the modem, I do run cat 6 to my firewall and I do get my full bandwidth. But their fiber to modem run was about 60ft of 5e here and I get near gig speed with no issue. So 5e should work just fine for 1Gbps.

My point though was that no one is going to get 40Gbps of speed on a copper ethernet cable. I mean, we are just now starting to get 2.5Gbps nics out there. There is no 40Gpbs copper ethernet adapters out there so it seems silly to market a speed that no one can get.
You are completely wrong. There are 40Gbps Ethernet adapters. We have them in our data center that I work at.
Like Reaction
2
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
1
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Apr 2017
L2: Beginner
256 Posts
46 Reputation
#47
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Oct 2006
L10: Grand Master
7,958 Posts
4,460 Reputation
#48
Bought some flat cat 7 of these cables in the past. They are junk. I get connection issues.
Like Reaction
4
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2015
L3: Novice
267 Posts
212 Reputation
#49
Quote :
Quote from oxyi :
40gb baseT does exist. You can do interconnect or hook up to supported devices.

40GBASE-T is a port type for 4-pair balanced twisted-pair Cat.8 copper cabling up to 30 m defined in IEEE 802.3bq.[118] IEEE 802.3bq-2016 standard was approved by The IEEE-SA Standards Board on June 30, 2016.[119] It uses 16-level PAM signaling over four lanes at 3,200 MBaud each, scaled up from 10GBASE-T.
Thank you for providing this information, as I was basically going to state the same thing. You can even do 100GbE over copper using Passive Twinax Cable.

I do 10GbE with CAT7 (yes it's a thing, even though it's not ratified by the stupid TIA/EIA). This cable is just fancy looking Chinese junk with no specifications or testing data. Just unsubstantiated claims.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2004
L11ty Billion: Ultimate
356 Posts
#50

Quote from necrodiety :
I have ATT fiber (1gb asymetric). I can tell you that the ATT installers are using plain ol cat 5e for their modem runs. I watched the guy pull it. From the modem, I do run cat 6 to my firewall and I do get my full bandwidth. But their fiber to modem run was about 60ft of 5e here and I get near gig speed with no issue. So 5e should work just fine for 1Gbps.

My point though was that no one is going to get 40Gbps of speed on a copper ethernet cable. I mean, we are just now starting to get 2.5Gbps nics out there. There is no 40Gpbs copper ethernet adapters out there so it seems silly to market a speed that no one can get.
Are you saying it's impossible to get 40Gbps over this copper Ethernet or you just don't have any experience with it? I've seen HDMI over Ethernet adapters and with HDMI 2.1 the speed limit was bumped to 48Gbps. I'm not aware of the physical limitations of the cable but there's already a need for it. It kind of turns into a chicken/egg problem and in this regard it's probably easier to make the cable first before investing design time into the adapters.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L3: Novice
107 Posts
17 Reputation
#51
Quote from Ebbi :
The guage wire of the matched pairs matters. I agree on not hitting 40Gbps, but I also know from installing ethernet cable (as a job, and now on the side) for 20+ years that yes... the cable matters. Cat 5e is fine if you're rocking out your 100 Mbps Comcast/Spectrum internet over wifi and just need the connection from router to (Networking/WiFi)device.

But if you're rocking some of the new(ish) 1 or 2 Gbps Fiber connections, you minimally want Cat 6 installed, and especially if you're hardwiring anything. Go ahead and go run some speedtests.

Don't take my word for it, you can find all the info you need all over the internet.
Load of bull. We run 10 gbit on cat5 200 ft just fine. Cable cat specifications has been turned into an rarely verified marketing gimmick by many. Ethernet pair wiring material (copper) and wire gauge is what you want followed by shielding and/or pair separation.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2016
L2: Beginner
71 Posts
27 Reputation
#52
Quote from couches200000 :
Load of bull. We run 10 gbit on cat5 200 ft just fine. Cable cat specifications has been turned into an rarely verified marketing gimmick by many. Ethernet pair wiring material (copper) and wire gauge is what you want followed by shielding and/or pair separation.
👌By all means. You should run whatever you want, that's your choice.

I specifically mentioned the wire guage of the matched pairs as well as 100m/~320ft for degredation, not sure why you repeated it back to me like new information.

Why not just go for broke and crank out your 10Gbps on ISDL and really teach me a lesson in bull***t? 😉

http://www.kit-communications.com...andle%20it.

Not sure why people care if other people want higher grade products.

It's like griping at people for buying steak when they can survive just fine on hot dogs.
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
1
Reply

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Aug 2020
L3: Novice
152 Posts
106 Reputation
#53
Is it flexible to meet open cable requirements?
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2012
L4: Apprentice
369 Posts
40 Reputation
#54
Quote from MxxC :
Devices don't need to support a physical spec of a CABLE. The only thing devices are concerned with are the connector and protocol those cables transit. Not their spec.
You're funny, because you're just talking semantics now. When someone says their car is a V6 do you go "No sir, a car is not a V6. An engine is a V6" if so, I feel bad for you trying to be a know it all but saying actually nothing.

OK smart guy, what consumer switches and routers support 40Gbps ethernet speeds. I'll wait for your genius self to answer.
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
1
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2007
L6: Expert
1,101 Posts
191 Reputation
#55
Quote from jrm523 :
You are completely wrong. There are 40Gbps Ethernet adapters. We have them in our data center that I work at.
Yeah, but are they RJ45? You are using DAC's or transceivers, not standard RJ45 ports (like the cable we are all talking about here). I'm not saying 40Gbps is impossible, it certainly is. I'm saying that there are no switches that I'm aware of that have RJ45 ports that can handle 40gbps. Maybe there is some kind of transceiver out there that'll go SFP to RJ45 at 40gbps... But I don't know why you'd want to do that instead of a DAC or even fiber.
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jan 2011
L3: Novice
258 Posts
106 Reputation
Pro
#56
Quote from rockdd :
Technically ANSI/TIA spec compliant CAT 8 copper cabling can support 40Gbps up to about 30m. Designed for datacenter usage (e.g. rack to rack).

Also, spec compliant copper cabling allows for CAT 5e up to 100m at 1Gbps (2.5Gbps & 5Gbps also possible due to new spec lowering the signaling rate). CAT 6A is designed for up to 100m at 10Gbps. CAT 6 is generally not deployed if 10Gbps support is planned because it's only designed for 10Gbps at reduce lengths (~55m). CAT 6A or fiber would be the preferred choice for 10Gbps.
My house has cat 5e run all over when built- I was researching and saw a similar article stating that cat 5e could do up to 2.5Gbps given the new standards. Appreciate the comment as I thought I was misreading it.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Dec 2016
L2: Beginner
99 Posts
14 Reputation
#57
This is the first I've heard of UGREEN but their shills are particularly active and aggressive on this thread.
Like Reaction
2
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Nov 2010
L2: Beginner
92 Posts
22 Reputation
#58
Quote from MichealM7200 :
I would have to assume that most people wouldnt be able to get anything over 1gbps over this 40gbps cable, as the copper ports on your router or switch is only capable of 1gbps. enterprise grade switches that support 10gbase-T are stupid expensive and I doubt anyone has one for home use. if there is a 40gbase-T switch out there, ive never seen it, but I bet it's still out of the retail price range
Plenty of tech savvy people have started in on 10gb for home use. Used enterprise switches and NICs have come down into ranges affordable for the people that would actually know how and what to use them for. I've just started working on my home network and server setup so haven't had a need to expand to it yet, but within the next 2-3 years I expect I'll need 10gb between, at the very least, my NAS and servers. By that point I'll probably be ready to rewire my house's 1960's electric and put cat6a throughout. If you're going to wire your house then wire it for the next 20+ years, and not just the bare minimum that works for today.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Mar 2014
L1: Learner
22 Posts
14 Reputation
#59
Quote from Ebbi :
The guage wire of the matched pairs matters. I agree on not hitting 40Gbps, but I also know from installing ethernet cable (as a job, and now on the side) for 20+ years that yes... the cable matters. Cat 5e is fine if you're rocking out your 100 Mbps Comcast/Spectrum internet over wifi and just need the connection from router to (Networking/WiFi)device.

But if you're rocking some of the new(ish) 1 or 2 Gbps Fiber connections, you minimally want Cat 6 installed, and especially if you're hardwiring anything. Go ahead and go run some speedtests.

Don't take my word for it, you can find all the info you need all over the internet.
Cat5 and Cat5e are rated for 1Gbps. See 802.3ab:

IEEE 802.3ab, ratified in 1999, defines Gigabit Ethernet transmission over unshielded twisted pair (UTP) category 5, 5e or 6 cabling, and became known as 1000BASE-T. With the ratification of 802.3ab, Gigabit Ethernet became a desktop technology as organizations could use their existing copper cabling infrastructure.
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Feb 2016
L2: Beginner
71 Posts
27 Reputation
#60
Quote from TommyT8361 :
Cat5 and Cat5e are rated for 1Gbps. See 802.3ab:

IEEE 802.3ab, ratified in 1999, defines Gigabit Ethernet transmission over unshielded twisted pair (UTP) category 5, 5e or 6 cabling, and became known as 1000BASE-T. With the ratification of 802.3ab, Gigabit Ethernet became a desktop technology as organizations could use their existing copper cabling infrastructure.
Yep. Rated for 1 Gbps.

As I keep stating- go for it. Run it everywhere. The difference of ~$17 for 1000 ft of Cat5e vs Cat6, I think people should always go for the cheapest option and never worry about anything else. 🙄

Go check out real world speed tests in a home wired with Cat5e to some outlets and Cat6 to some.

And FWIW: many things are "rated" to a specification and don't quite reach it.

A great example is HDMI cables.

But, I don't care. To each their own. I'll pay the marginal cost difference to do my best to stay ahead of the curve when possible.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
2
Reply
Last edited by Ebbi June 10, 2021 at 10:43 AM.
Page 4 of 5
1 2 3 4 5
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 

Trending Stores

Coupons for Popular Stores

Link Copied to Clipboard

Slickdeals is community-supported. We may get paid by brands or deals, including promoted items.