Forum Thread

[Solved] How to fix M24E14 M24EI4 power supply board

qwe1234 2,734 760 November 10, 2009 at 11:25 PM
My Soyo 24 monitor that I bought last year at a geeks deal has just died on me today.
Its internal power supply, which most likely is a problem, M24E14 great wall, is nowhere seems to be found but the taobao.com web site.
The zener ZD1 has burned out therefore likely some other components dead too.
Solved by substitution a USA made generic PSU that has required voltage.
Quote from bizcards View Post :
I replaced (adapted) the ZD1 with an axial 30V 1 watt zener diode (to prevent overheating) and it worked like a charm, just watch out for polarity when replacing it. I also replaced a couple of bulked top caps under one of the heatsink.

I hope this will help you as well

Regards

Community Wiki

Last Edited by qwe1234 October 16, 2010 at 05:37 AM
Quote from bizcards View Post :
I replaced (adapted) the ZD1 with an axial 30V 1 watt zener diode (to prevent overheating) and it worked like a charm, just watch out for polarity when replacing it. I also replaced a couple of bulked top caps under one of the heatsink.

I hope this will help you as well

Regards
Thank you.

602 Comments

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#436
Quote from MaileK View Post :
Is everyone (like me) still looking for replacement power supplies for this monitor? If so, I'm thinking about just saving us all al lot of trouble with a purchase of a large stack of them. Then I'd put them on eBay or something... at a reasonable price (small markup from total cost to import them).

How many people would buy one or more? I'm going to throw out a ballpark of $45 incl. budget shipping but perhaps less if it works out well.

-Paul
I am in for one. My went kaput a while back; a friend replaced various caps and such, and it was working for about 30 minutes.... heard a pop and smelled burning. Opened it up and looks like one of the zener diode burned...

-d
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#437
Quote from brokeh View Post :
The end result is worth it, though- a great monitor that works reliably, with the new power supply contained entirely inside the original plastic shell.

Enjoy.
Does changing the power supply also get rid of the buzzing noise from the monitor that changes in intensity when you adjust the brightness? Or is that another part?
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#438
Is the replacement power supply that people were getting back in 2010 still available anywhere?
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#439
Quote from KevinVanLear View Post :
Is the replacement power supply that people were getting back in 2010 still available anywhere?
Not that I can see.
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#440
Does anybody want to get in on a group buy for the 200-P00-MLT666A-AH supply? Shopjimmy discounts pretty heavily when you order in quantity.
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#441
Has anyone had any luck getting a PSU replacement from aliexpress?

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Gr...81248.html

Seems to be the right kind, but not sure about availability.
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#442
In my search for the power supply board replacement I have stumbled upon this closed ebay listing:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayIS...0665973250

Seems like it's a revised board with proper connector pinouts. Part number appears to be SHL2701F-133

Only place I was able to find that board is on TaoBao that I haven't had any experience dealing with.
If anyone can understand Chinese and/or has dealt with TaoBao/agents in the past, perhaps they could advice on the best course of action to obtain these replacement boards.
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#443
I just bought this from aliexpress. Instead of what was in the picture I received the old model and it was clearly a refurbished. However the unit did not work for more than 2 seconds and made a loud buzzing noise. They wanted me to pay return shipping to have their techs look at it. Or they offered to refund me $2 after paying return shipping and if they refunded the $2 they would not send a new one, I paid $50 and they offer $2? I opened a dispute with aliexpress and we'll see what if anything they do. I have a feeling I'll be getting screwed out of $50. Seller is fangjun liu, you've been warned.


Quote from RusskySam View Post :
Has anyone had any luck getting a PSU replacement from aliexpress?

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Gr...81248.html

Seems to be the right kind, but not sure about availability.
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#444
anyone try the rt65D PSU replacement recommended by user parrish? i just finished doing a repair, and have only partial success at best.

current symptoms are that when turned on, screen flashes for a second with the appropriate output (e.g. windows desktop, OSD shows "digital" indicating source is detected), but then goes blank / black. Blue LED light remains on, and Windows still thinks the monitor is there. Changing the resolution OS also results in brief flash, then back to blank.

However, sometimes doing this does make it work (usually preceded by a odd, slow tiling effect), in which case DVI/VGA all work fine, and image is perfect. Even pressing power button on/off doesn't cause problems. Unplugging seems to cause problem to recur again, though.

is this related to insufficient loads for the PSU as mentioned with the higher rated PSUs, though user parrish's similar repair was working perfectly? faulty wiring on my part is of course a possibility but seems unlikely since it occasionally works fine. Any ideas? i did see the chinese user's fix ( http://slickdeals.net/forums/showpost.php?p=31972593&postcount=332 ) but info is too vague to be useful.

anway while it was working, I navigated the OSD and recorded common actions in case need to make changes while screen isn't working.
Brightness = Menu, +, Menu +/-
INput select = Menu, +x4, Menu, +/- , Menu
Reset Settings = Menu, -x2, menux2)
Exit = Menu, -, menu)
brightness presets = mode, (+/-)
auto to exit/back out of menu
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Last edited by traycerb March 7, 2013 at 11:06 AM
#445
For the benefit of all, I'm posting this in the thread. User traycerb sent me a PM:

brokeh, not sure the odds of you reading this years later, but since you're one of the few to do a successful Soyo repair, wanted your thoughts on issues I'm having with my repair.

I've described the symptoms on a post in the thread (http://slickdeals.net/forums/show...tcount=444), but in short I used a RT65D switching PSU, an now it usually flashes the desktop for a second then goes blank. Sometimes it works perfectly though.

any chance you could reply via message or weigh in on the thread for all to see? thanks.

Based on your description, it sounds like the backlight is turning off (can you confirm this by viewing the panel in a dark room? if this is the case, there should be no light emitted from the viewing surface at all). That means the 24V rail is probably turning off entirely, or providing power that is not usable (poor voltage regulation, insufficient current, or both).

From personal experience.. I can confirm that the minimum load requirement on switchmode PSUs is kind of a drag, especially when your application only presents a minor load. Did you use a load resistor as parrish described? If so, how many ohms, and rated at what wattage? Does it get hot? Make sure you're using a resistor with a high power rating (not the 1/4 or 1/8 watt kind sold at Radio Shack) or it will burn up / catch on fire.

To present a 0.5 A load at 5V, you want an R = V/I, or 5 / 0.5 = 10 ohm resistor. The power dissipated in it will be P = I*V = 0.5 A * 5V = 2.5 watts. I would suggest buying a resistor that is rated for 5 or better yet 10 watts.

The other issue that parrish brought up with the RT65D (I haven't confirmed) is the current rating of the 24V rail being insufficient to operate at full brightness. It's possible that this is causing you problems. Generally you want your power supply rating to exceed the maximum current you intend to draw, with some margin (10-20%). Based on the specs provided, the choice of the RT65D does not achieve that goal, so you're kinda asking for trouble. It's like a 205 lb man sitting in a hammock rated for 200 lb. Keeping the brightness down may or may not work here-- it will lower the average current drawn by the inverter (what you'd measure with a meter), but probably not the instantaneous current (the inverter does not draw a current smoothly).

Try turning on the monitor, and checking the 5V, 12V, and 24V outputs from the PSU with a meter. If the 5V rail is not regulating correctly, the others probably aren't either. You may not be able to see this without an oscilloscope, however.

I wasn't able to decipher the Chinese user's fix either, but it turned out not to be necessary for me. I did have to replace the video board in one of my monitors as it went bad and was causing the monitor to turn itself on and off unattended (just like someone was standing there pressing the power button occasionally).

Good luck.

Quote from traycerb View Post :
anyone try the rt65D PSU replacement recommended by user parrish? i just finished doing a repair, and have only partial success at best.

current symptoms are that when turned on, screen flashes for a second with the appropriate output (e.g. windows desktop, OSD shows "digital" indicating source is detected), but then goes blank / black. Blue LED light remains on, and Windows still thinks the monitor is there. Changing the resolution OS also results in brief flash, then back to blank.

However, sometimes doing this does make it work (usually preceded by a odd, slow tiling effect), in which case DVI/VGA all work fine, and image is perfect. Even pressing power button on/off doesn't cause problems. Unplugging seems to cause problem to recur again, though.

is this related to insufficient loads for the PSU as mentioned with the higher rated PSUs, though user parrish's similar repair was working perfectly? faulty wiring on my part is of course a possibility but seems unlikely since it occasionally works fine. Any ideas? i did see the chinese user's fix ( http://slickdeals.net/forums/showpost.php?p=31972593&postcount=332 ) but info is too vague to be useful.

anway while it was working, I navigated the OSD and recorded common actions in case need to make changes while screen isn't working.
Brightness = Menu, +, Menu +/-
INput select = Menu, +x4, Menu, +/- , Menu
Reset Settings = Menu, -x2, menux2)
Exit = Menu, -, menu)
brightness presets = mode, (+/-)
auto to exit/back out of menu
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#446
Quote from brokeh View Post :

Based on your description, it sounds like the backlight is turning off (can you confirm this by viewing the panel in a dark room? if this is the case, there should be no light emitted from the viewing surface at all). That means the 24V rail is probably turning off entirely, or providing power that is not usable (poor voltage regulation, insufficient current, or both).

From personal experience.. I can confirm that the minimum load requirement on switchmode PSUs is kind of a drag, especially when your application only presents a minor load. Did you use a load resistor as parrish described? If so, how many ohms, and rated at what wattage? Does it get hot? Make sure you're using a resistor with a high power rating (not the 1/4 or 1/8 watt kind sold at Radio Shack) or it will burn up / catch on fire.

To present a 0.5 A load at 5V, you want an R = V/I, or 5 / 0.5 = 10 ohm resistor. The power dissipated in it will be P = I*V = 0.5 A * 5V = 2.5 watts. I would suggest buying a resistor that is rated for 5 or better yet 10 watts.
brokeh, thanks for the reply. Backlight was definitely off; no light at all. Salvaged a ~3 Watt 20 ohm resistor from an old PC PSU and put it across the 5V line (yieldng 0.25A), and now the monitor is working great. I can live with 1.25 Watts of waste. I'll post a write-up on the repair soon, (probably on HardForum).

Few more questions if you can spare a second:

1. In retrospect, what do you think of the following PSU, RPT-65G? http://www.meanwell.com/search/rpt-65/

Seems better based on specs (see below), as
1) it has same power uncooled (and can increase further with modest cooling),
2) higher total peak load (3.75A available vs. measured requirements of 1A (on 5V) + 0.025A (on 12V) + 2.5A (on 24V) = 3.525A (see post 77)),
3) best of all, minimal load requirements (0.09A).

RPT-65G
DC Voltage: 24V / 5V / 12V
Rated Current: 2.25A / 1.2A / 0.5A
Current Range: 0.09 ~ 2.9A / 0 ~ 1.5A / 0 ~ 0.7A
Peak Load: 3.75 A* / Rated load / Rated load
RATED POWER: 66W (Rated output power for convection)
OUTPUT POWER (max.): 80W with 18CFM min. forced air

*10% duty cycle maximum within every second. Average output power should not exceed the rated power, output voltage above 90% DC voltage

2. One of my VESA mount threaded standoffs broke, so there's just a gaping hole on the metal box on the back of the monitor. Your .pdf mentions threaded standoffs, which made me think I could use something analagous to STAINLESS STEEL HEX STANDOFF CAT# SP-291 http://www.allelectronics.com/mak...-32/1.html, and put a nut on screw part to hold it to the monitor. Any thoughts?
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#447
traycerb,

Awesome that you were able to get it working! I'm glad to help save another one of these great monitors from the landfill. It's really a tragedy that the electronics are so terrible, because the panel itself is fantastic (the reason this thread exists).

Anyway, your choice of resistor looks good. If you have any further trouble with the monitor not staying on, try attaching another identical resistor in parallel to increase the minimum load to 0.5A.

As for your questions:

1. I agree that the RPT-65G looks like a better choice in terms of the lower load requirement and the higher current rating at 24V. However, the numbers I have written down for the current draw are 2.5A@24V, 0.025A@12V, and 1A@5V, which is 2.5*24+0.025*12+1*5 = 65.3 watts. The RPT-65G is rated for 66 watts with convection cooling only, so that's cutting it a little close. The RT-65 is rated for 68 watts, so there's a wee bit more margin. Not a huge deal, though.

The rated current on the 24V rail is 0.25A below what the monitor draws at full brightness, but this should not be an issue as long as the combined power for all channels is below the rated power (66 watts).

According to the spec sheet, with an 18 CFM (cubic feet per minute) or greater cooling fan, the RPT-65G can supply a maximum of 80W. I don't know if you mounted the new power supply inside the case, or are using it externally, but improving natural airflow and/or adding a fan will help increase longevity if you're operating the PSU in the higher power ranges. Physically, the RPT-65 is a little narrower and thinner, which might also be good if you are intending it mount it internally.

Just a side note- you can't add currents at different voltages (as you've done to get 3.525A) because they're apples and oranges. You can do this with power (volts times amps), but not voltage or current. Calculate watts first, then add; see my calculation of 65.3 watts above. The 3.75A in the spec sheet is just for the 24V rail. The 12V and 5V rails have a peak load equal to their rated loads (0.5A, and 1.2A, respectively). You have to compare the load currents to the current specs at each output voltage individually, and then also make sure that total power you're drawing is less than the maximum rating.

2. Based on a quick google search, the VESA mount screws are probably M4 (metric) with a 0.7 thread pitch. I bet you could find an M4 standoff that is about 6mm or so in length (6mm is a wild guess; measure how far above the sheet metal the other three protrude, and get that) on eBay, at a computer store, or maybe if you're lucky- a hardware store. I'd recommend a M-F standoff and a nut, rather than a F-F standoff and a screw, because you won't have very many threads inside such a short standoff, and so the two male screws will probably run in to one another. Drop the male end of the standoff through the hole (you may need a washer on each side of the hole to keep it from going all the way through), and put a nut on it from the back side. Preferably a lock nut (with the nylon locking insert), or something that won't come apart if you ever need to unscrew the monitor from the VESA mount. Tighten that sucker!

Let us know how it goes.

Quote from traycerb View Post :
brokeh, thanks for the reply. Backlight was definitely off; no light at all. Salvaged a ~3 Watt 20 ohm resistor from an old PC PSU and put it across the 5V line (yieldng 0.25A), and now the monitor is working great. I can live with 1.25 Watts of waste. I'll post a write-up on the repair soon, (probably on HardForum).

Few more questions if you can spare a second:

1. In retrospect, what do you think of the following PSU, RPT-65G? http://www.meanwell.com/search/rpt-65/

Seems better based on specs (see below), as
1) it has same power uncooled (and can increase further with modest cooling),
2) higher total peak load (3.75A available vs. measured requirements of 1A (on 5V) + 0.025A (on 12V) + 2.5A (on 24V) = 3.525A (see post 77)),
3) best of all, minimal load requirements (0.09A).

RPT-65G
DC Voltage: 24V / 5V / 12V
Rated Current: 2.25A / 1.2A / 0.5A
Current Range: 0.09 ~ 2.9A / 0 ~ 1.5A / 0 ~ 0.7A
Peak Load: 3.75 A* / Rated load / Rated load
RATED POWER: 66W (Rated output power for convection)
OUTPUT POWER (max.): 80W with 18CFM min. forced air

*10% duty cycle maximum within every second. Average output power should not exceed the rated power, output voltage above 90% DC voltage

2. One of my VESA mount threaded standoffs broke, so there's just a gaping hole on the metal box on the back of the monitor. Your .pdf mentions threaded standoffs, which made me think I could use something analagous to STAINLESS STEEL HEX STANDOFF CAT# SP-291 http://www.allelectronics.com/mak...-32/1.html, and put a nut on screw part to hold it to the monitor. Any thoughts?
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#448
if anyone has a broken Topaz, i could use the cards out of it.
inverter and tcon?
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#449
Quote from traycerb View Post :
brokeh, thanks for the reply. Backlight was definitely off; no light at all. Salvaged a ~3 Watt 20 ohm resistor from an old PC PSU and put it across the 5V line (yieldng 0.25A), and now the monitor is working great. I can live with 1.25 Watts of waste. I'll post a write-up on the repair soon, (probably on HardForum).
Quick follow-up: Unfortunately, the repair doesn't seem to be a durable one. The monitor started flickering, and eventually wouldn't turn on and was accompanied by a strong buzzing sound, consistent with an inverter failure.

Worked for more than a day of consistent use when the case was off, but failed within an hour when the case was on. This suggests a possibly heat-related etiology, maybe associated with decreasing output described by the PSU derating curve. No idea if this is the actual cause, or what the mechanism of damage would be if the PSU output was low.

Saw two surface mount fuses on the inverter, and both were intact, and all caps looked fine. When the case was off, I did notice the metal panel touching the PSU did get too hot to touch (~110-120 F = 40-50C). if actually at 50C, actual output would be ~80% of rated. After inverter failure, checked the PSU and all outputs were fine, probably within tolerance.

not sure if pursuing this further is worth the effort, but didn't want anyone else to go down this path and end up with the same disappointing result.
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#450
Quote from traycerb View Post :
Quick follow-up: Unfortunately, the repair doesn't seem to be a durable one. The monitor started flickering, and eventually wouldn't turn on and was accompanied by a strong buzzing sound, consistent with an inverter failure.

Worked for more than a day of consistent use when the case was off, but failed within an hour when the case was on. This suggests a possibly heat-related etiology, maybe associated with decreasing output described by the PSU derating curve. No idea if this is the actual cause, or what the mechanism of damage would be if the PSU output was low.

Saw two surface mount fuses on the inverter, and both were intact, and all caps looked fine. When the case was off, I did notice the metal panel touching the PSU did get too hot to touch (~110-120 F = 40-50C). if actually at 50C, actual output would be ~80% of rated. After inverter failure, checked the PSU and all outputs were fine, probably within tolerance.
HardOCP.com has a 75-page thread about the 24" Soyo monitor:

http://hardforum.com/showthread.p...light=soyo

Did you resolder the pins of each transformer?
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