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Hard drive speeds for accessing only HD media - 5,400 RPM vs 7,200 RPM

Benjigga 95 28 July 26, 2010 at 03:21 PM
I have a HTPC and am looking into getting another 2tb HD to store the media. I generally get 720p video but occasionally get the 1080p.

I would just like some input as to whether getting a 5,400 RPM hard drive would have any difference over a 7,200 RPM drive other than obvious transfer speeds. More so, would it have an affect on 1080p video?

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#2
A 5400RPM drive would likely be quieter, cooler, and use slightly less power while still providing sufficient transfer speeds for 1080p playback.
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#3
Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you Smilie

I tried to give rep, but it's telling me I have to spread rep around before giving it to you again. I guess you were the last person I gave rep to before in some other thread... either way, much appreciated.
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#4
No, for 1080P video files both should be sufficent. The 5400rpm drive will use less power and be quieter as well.

Edit I just ran across this lengthy review and it answers what your asking http://www.tomshardware.com/revie...,2630.html
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Last edited by LiquidRetro July 26, 2010 at 03:50 PM.
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#5
Quote from Benjigga View Post :
I have a HTPC and am looking into getting another 2tb HD to store the media. I generally get 720p video but occasionally get the 1080p.

I would just like some input as to whether getting a 5,400 RPM hard drive would have any difference over a 7,200 RPM drive other than obvious transfer speeds. More so, would it have an affect on 1080p video?
Stuck with WD Blue 7,200 RPMs very quite no issues.

4,200 rpm
5,400 rpm
7,200 rpm

5,400 rpm mostly found in netbook / laptops
7,200 rpm is what you need and a large cache 16, 32, 64.
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When I ask for a tablet they shouldn't tell me to go into the pharmacy to get one! Wink
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#6
Quote from tipstir View Post :
Stuck with WD Blue 7,200 RPMs very quite no issues.

4,200 rpm
5,400 rpm
7,200 rpm

5,400 rpm mostly found in netbook / laptops
7,200 rpm is what you need and a large cache 16, 32, 64.
more RPM = More heat generated which requires more cooling to dissipate.
therefore drive noise isnt the only thing to take into account.

also, what is the actual type of HD video?
Isit RAW hdv footage?
BluRay iso's or folder rips?
or is it torrented and compressed content that is mucj lower bitrate than either of the above?

a single 5400rpm drive will handle any of the above for one stream, however it may start to have issues with multiple streams at the same time for the first two.
If it is compressed content, then you can usually get several streams concurrently off even a slow drive.
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all tech support threads will now be answered with possibly random and false information.
This is due to the retardedness of posters and answering posters in general.
thank you, have a nice day.
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#7
Read the benchmarks guys. Spindle speed does not necessarily mean speed. Many of the "Green" 5400 rpm hard drives of today are as fast as the older 7200rpm hd's of a few years ago. These drives will read faster than they write which is what he needs. Almost all will read at over 100mb/s and there is just no way that he is doing 4k video with bitrates that high.
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#8
Quote from R1Budha View Post :
more RPM = More heat generated which requires more cooling to dissipate.
therefore drive noise isnt the only thing to take into account.

also, what is the actual type of HD video?
Isit RAW hdv footage?
BluRay iso's or folder rips?
or is it torrented and compressed content that is mucj lower bitrate than either of the above?

a single 5400rpm drive will handle any of the above for one stream, however it may start to have issues with multiple streams at the same time for the first two.
If it is compressed content, then you can usually get several streams concurrently off even a slow drive.
5GB B-Ray 1080p MKv or 720p
I downlaod and convert YT 720p to 1080p be played like Music Videos over the network streamed from Media Server (HTPC) to it clients or netbooks, laptops, desktops or HD desktops connected to HDTV via HDMI.

Yes 5,400rpm drive SATA II in laptop is okay to use. Since battery would be an issue. I have one LED/LCD Laptop with B-Ray/DVDRW and HDMI so that unit has this type of drive. Desktop Quad-Core running Windows 7 Ultimate/SageTV MC 1080p has 3x 2TB running @ 7,200rpm there is enough cooling in that case to keep those puppies running.

Well I use the Quad-Core to eliminate those bottlenecks of the past system. This would be system N0. 6 Records HDTV or SDTV, streams media to network HD Player and several network SD players. The box is on 24/7 connected to APC with 45 min battery backup. Can't run these devices without such a backup. One brown out could take it down. Real pain to bring it backup.
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#9
Quote from LiquidRetro View Post :
Read the benchmarks guys. Spindle speed does not necessarily mean speed. Many of the "Green" 5400 rpm hard drives of today are as fast as the older 7200rpm hd's of a few years ago. These drives will read faster than they write which is what he needs. Almost all will read at over 100mb/s and there is just no way that he is doing 4k video with bitrates that high.
Media HDD I've change the default file size (512) to 4096 when I format them. I don't have issues with 7,200rpms and they're quick. Laptops and Desktops are built differently today than yesteryears.
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#10
A modern 3.5" 5400rpm drive can perform sequential transfers around 100MBps, a full BluRay only hits maybe 5MBps. So, the hard drive will never be the bottleneck for a single video.

Truly uncompressed HD can be troublesome (1080p, 60fps, 8bits per sample, 4:2:0 chroma subsampling would be 180MBps), but that's only an issue for video editors.
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Last edited by redskull July 27, 2010 at 11:08 AM.
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#11
Quote from redskull View Post :
A modern 3.5" 5400rpm drive can perform sequential transfers around 100MBps, a full BluRay only hits maybe 5MBps. So, the hard drive will never be the bottleneck for a single video.

Truly uncompressed HD can be troublesome (1080p, 60fps, 8bits per sample, 4:2:0 chroma subsampling would be 180MBps), but that's only an issue for video editors.
try more like 75MBps in real world usage. if that.

and when reading multiple tracks, its not just the overall speed, its how fast the drive can seek and how much cache it has that start to become important, especially on large multi platter drives that have a lot of data on them.
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