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Can't delete a few left over files from a deleted Windows 7 profile...

Mixels 5,914 920 April 27, 2011 at 11:55 AM
Hey everyone, I recently had to delete a user account on a family computer and would like to recreate it, but I can't get rid of the folder for the account in C:\Users because it contains system files that don't seem to want to go away. Specifically, these files are credential files that Windows stores in:

C:\Users\AccountName\AppData\Microsoft\Local\Credentials
and
C:\Users\AccountName\AppData\Microsoft\Roaming\Credentials

These "Credentials" folders contain system files. System files that don't do anything anymore. Worse, they're system folder, so I can't delete them. Nothing I do seems to loosen the almighty Windows grip on these two folders. Consequently, any time I try to claim ownership of them through an elevated command prompt with the takeown command, I get an access denied error.

I did create a second account--an Administrator account of course--that will replace the old user account. These left over files have nothing to do with any installed programs or anything. (I know because this computer was recently formatted and there aren't any installed programs.) Does anyone know how I can get rid of them?

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Joined Jan 2006
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#2
rm -rf /path/to/file
from a ntfs-3g enabled linux live cd
:-)
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Joined Apr 2005
lurkz
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#3
Quote from vivahate View Post :
rm -rf /path/to/file
from a ntfs-3g enabled linux live cd
:-)
Sigh... no way to do this within Windows? heh
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#4
Have you tried running cmd prompt in admin mode even if you are logged in using admin user account and then deleting it with DOS commands? I've never had to do this from experience but wonder if that would help. Also what about booting into safe mode and trying it maybe there's some process that gets automatically started with windows boot.
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Joined Apr 2005
lurkz
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#5
Quote from JusminTheGreat View Post :
Have you tried running cmd prompt in admin mode even if you are logged in using admin user account and then deleting it with DOS commands? I've never had to do this from experience but wonder if that would help. Also what about booting into safe mode and trying it maybe there's some process that gets automatically started with windows boot.
Yeah, that's what an elevated command prompt is--a command prompt run as Administrator. I tried Safe Mode just for laughs, but because this is a Windows permissions issue, I knew it wouldn't work. Thanks for the tips though. Smilie
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#6
Have you tried FileAssasin [malwarebytes.org]

Worth a shot.
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#7
Quote from Mixels View Post :
Hey everyone, I recently had to delete a user account on a family computer and would like to recreate it, but I can't get rid of the folder for the account in C:\Users because it contains system files that don't seem to want to go away. Specifically, these files are credential files that Windows stores in:

C:\Users\AccountName\AppData\Local\Credentials
and
C:\Users\AccountName\AppData\Roaming\Credentials

These "Credentials" folders contain system files. System files that don't do anything anymore. Worse, they're system folder, so I can't delete them. Nothing I do seems to loosen the almighty Windows grip on these two folders. Consequently, any time I try to claim ownership of them through an elevated command prompt with the takeown command, I get an access denied error.

I did create a second account--an Administrator account of course--that will replace the old user account. These left over files have nothing to do with any installed programs or anything. (I know because this computer was recently formatted and there aren't any installed programs.) Does anyone know how I can get rid of them?
Scratchchin My system doesn't have these folders. I have AppData\Local\Microsoft\Credentials though. What do the permissions and ownership show for the folder?
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#8
Can you take ownership of the folder and subfolders?

If that doesn't work, maybe this will

http://www.rizwanashraf.com/2009/...in-wndows/

I found this one on the quick, I used to have different tool that let you take over, but it is on a different computer.
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Joined Dec 2003
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#9
On Windows 7, just deleting the user folders does not properly delete the whole user account. If you do it this way, you must also go into the registry and delete the SID for that account. Do a search in the registry for ProfileList. The first 3 shorter lines are usually for the system accounts. Start looking at the folder paths in the longer lines for the one that references the account you want to delete. You have to delete that line from the registry.
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I once prayed to God for a bike, but quickly found out he didnt work that way...so I stole a bike and prayed for his forgiveness. Angel Not
Joined Apr 2005
lurkz
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Original Poster
#10
Quote from Mavtech View Post :
On Windows 7, just deleting the user folders does not properly delete the whole user account. If you do it this way, you must also go into the registry and delete the SID for that account. Do a search in the registry for ProfileList. The first 3 shorter lines are usually for the system accounts. Start looking at the folder paths in the longer lines for the one that references the account you want to delete. You have to delete that line from the registry.
That did the trick. Should have known to just search the registry for the name of the folder. Facepalm Thanks! Smilie And I didn't just delete the user folder. You can't just delete a user folder. I deleted the account through User Accounts, which works well enough for all intents and purposes, but apparently it doesn't delete some of the relevant registry settings, the likes of which prevent deletion of some data files. Thusly arrived my dilemma. Why the bloody blazes Microsoft even gives you the option to delete the user's files when deleting a user account is beyond me, considering it doesn't work and all.

Reps to everyone. Sorry for not replying to your posts. Busy busy. Frown
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