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Warping under kitchen sink due to water leak

5,082 608 October 11, 2011 at 04:54 PM
Not the usual technical question I ask, but here it goes. My garbage disposal had a slow leak for a couple of weeks. Replaced the disposal and cleaned everything out under there, but the cabinet bottom under the sink slightly sags in the middle.

I am not a big fan of having to rip the whole counter apart since it is part of a entire section of shelving as well as having a solid granite top. What is the proper way to handle this? Do I just screw a board over the top of the thing and try to blend it in?

Also, before the question comes up, I checked everything out while cleaning and there doesn't appear to be mold anywhere. The water pooled enough to make to wood bend, but it didn't penetrate through apparently.

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#2
baseboards are on the floor. Are you referring to a brace under the sink or what? Take a pic and post it?
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Quote from DealTakr
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baseboards are on the floor. Are you referring to a brace under the sink or what? Take a pic and post it?
I can take a picture later, what I am talking about is the bottom of the cabinet below the sink. Not a baseboard, I said that wrong up there.
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#4
If it were me I would just leave it as is. It will look bad, but it is under the sink, so who cares? Repairing something like that is just asking to have water leak again. nod
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#5
If the wood is sagging, any way you can brace it up where it's supposed to be? After it dries out it should stay.
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#6
i would just screw a piece of plywood over the top and then put down contact paper / shelf liner with a fun design over it.
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Quote from silenze
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i would just screw a piece of plywood over the top and then put down contact paper / shelf liner with a fun design over it.
Is it the bottom of the cabinets he is talking about? Unless they're really expensive cabinets that is usually particle board. If it gets wet enough it will swell up and come apart. If thats the case I would probably replace it.
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When we moved into our old place, one of the cabinet bottoms had sagged 3" -- chipboard is that good. laugh out loud To cover the whole bottom I cut a piece of plywood in two so it would fit through the door openings. And to prevent further warpage from water, it was painted with oil based varnish, but you could instead use vinyl shelf liner. Lacquer (Varathane) is a lot more permeable to water, and water based enamels let in water at something like 100x the rate that oil based paint does.
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Thanks for the ideas. As for bracing, I can't get under it to try and pick it up. It is also dry so I can't reshape it. I like the idea of just putting a new bottom on the old one, but how do I keep that from looking like a poorly thought out step up from the cabinet door?

Imagine opening the front door of a house and stepping up a few inches to go inside. That is the idea of what I am trying to avoid. Do I just use a thin laminate or something?
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#10
Quote from larrymoencurly
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When we moved into our old place, one of the cabinet bottoms had sagged 3" -- chipboard is that good. laugh out loud To cover the whole bottom I cut a piece of plywood in two so it would fit through the door openings. And to prevent further warpage from water, it was painted with oil based varnish, but you could instead use vinyl shelf liner. Lacquer (Varathane) is a lot more permeable to water, and water based enamels let in water at something like 100x the rate that oil based paint does.
that sounds like the best fix.
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Quote from Somesort
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Thanks for the ideas. As for bracing, I can't get under it to try and pick it up. It is also dry so I can't reshape it. I like the idea of just putting a new bottom on the old one, but how do I keep that from looking like a poorly thought out step up from the cabinet door?

Imagine opening the front door of a house and stepping up a few inches to go inside. That is the idea of what I am trying to avoid. Do I just use a thin laminate or something?
you can buy plywood at 1/16 inch thick. or luan board at 1/4 inch
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#12
Hey OP there was an article in either October or September of Handyman magazine showing step by step directions to resolve this.

How to replace sink base cabinet floor [familyhandyman.com]
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Last edited by yotafan October 11, 2011 at 07:57 PM.
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Quote from yotafan
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Hey OP there was an article in either October or September of Handyman magazine showing step by step directions to resolve this.

How to replace sink base cabinet floor [familyhandyman.com]
That looks like a good plan, thanks for the article.
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Quote from Somesort
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I like the idea of just putting a new bottom on the old one, but how do I keep that from looking like a poorly thought out step up from the cabinet door?
Does an approximately 1/2" step-up really look bad, especially considering it will usually be covered by the doors? If you think so, cut out the existing bottom, leaving at least a 2" perimeter, and pry out that perimeter from the inside (easier to pry if the perimeter is 2" wide than 1" wide). Because the new bottom will probably have to be 2 pieces of wood, add a brace underneath where they meet, to hold them together better
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#15
I go with TheWoman.. leave it if it isn't that bad
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