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Philips 10W (60W eqivalent) L Prize LED bulb $14.97 Home Depot B&M only, YMMV, perhaps

MrKay 50 March 2, 2013 at 07:12 PM in Your Mileage May Vary (YMMV) (8)
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I found this at Home Depot in Oakbrook, IL, this afternoon:

http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5...ord=643430

Note that this is the same price that HD gets for the 60W equivalent that uses 12.5 watts:

Amazon lists this for $34.05:

http://www.amazon.com/Philips-423...rds=423244

I checked and do not think that this is a repost. I found a thread from last year that got thumbed down when the bulbs were $40. This is closer to the price of similar bulbs, and I haven't found another that puts out this much light while using only 10 watts.

280 Comments

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#226
Quote from pdxwaker View Post :
How's that? 800 Lumens (Cree) vs. 940 Lumens (Philips). Clearly, the Philips bulb is brighter.

CREE 9 watts, 60 watt equiv, 5000K temp, $13.97
Philips 10 watts, 60 watt equiv, 2700K temp, $14.97

CREE lumens per watt is 88, Philips is 94. Basically a wash.
CREE is 5000K versus 2700K. Definitely not a wash.

Overall if you want bright AND white, the CREE wins out.
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#227
Quote from Mooper View Post :
As I've mentioned ad nauseum, the bulb appearance, size, weight, and heat are *far* different for the Cree versus the Philips. Placing the Philips in a bulb-exposed fixture like an open lamp or vanity light gives you an attention-getting appliance, to say the least. It also produces subtle shadowing on any enclosure or shade. Not inherently bad, but it's a big difference. Warranty (Cree has 10 year versus Philips 6) is a consideration for some as well.
We get it. You, personally, prefer the appearance of Cree's bulb to Philip's. You've made over 30 comments in this thread to that effect. Please drop it.

It's plain to see what the Philips bulbs look like. Any potential buyers could see that readily enough in the original deal posting, and I'm sure most Home Depot customers have seen the similar-looking AmbientLEDs in stores over the past few years.

Instead of discussing the merits of this deal, you've been continually dragging the discussion back to another product, with inferior specs, that you haven't seen, made by a company you hold stock in. Why don't you make a new thread for the Cree if you think it's so great?

Please stop pushing your personal prejudices on this. I really am getting nauseous. vomit
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#228
Quote from travfar View Post :
CREE 9 watts, 60 watt equiv, 5000K temp, $13.97
Philips 10 watts, 60 watt equiv, 2700K temp, $14.97

CREE lumens per watt is 88, Philips is 94. Basically a wash.
CREE is 5000K versus 2700K. Definitely not a wash.

Overall if you want bright AND white, the CREE wins out.
Is a daylight bulb for inside your house?
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#229
Where I can I buy the CREE individually? Home Depot appears to be selling only the 6 pack.
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#230
Quote from handyguy View Post :
Is a daylight bulb for inside your house?
Why not?
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#231
Quote from uniten View Post :
I am saying it does not sound like you have the L Prize bulbs but the older gen bulbs. I am not talking about temperature here.
I have both the L-Prize ones and older generation ones. And other brands, for that matter.

Quote from uniten View Post :
I did not mention lumens but if you want to go there, you can always dim the higher lumens, you can't make a less lumen bulb brighter.
Not if they aren't on a dimming switch. My bathroom has six downward-facing glass bell fixtures above mirrors, for example. I love the Philips light quality, but won't use them because the bulbs look ridiculous (to me) and because I don't want 940 lumens there (the room has other lighting, so I prefer 600-800 for the mirrors). No dimmer.

Quote from uniten View Post :
IAs for CRI, do you know what CRI is? There is a difference between 80 and 94.The difference is not in the light it produces and there is no way to tell them apart unless you see them both side by side.
I know quite well, and that's why I said that to most people, 94 isn't going to be a noticeable difference versus 80. Get too extreme on the low end and mistakes like you described become possible. 80 is not that low.

Quote from uniten View Post :
To be more accurate, 80 CRI is the minimum acceptable CRI for a bulb, but there is obviously a difference between 80 and 94.That is if you care about more accurate colors.
To whom? To me, it is. Not to all. Most people aren't going to notice the accuracy difference between 80 and 94, but they very well might between 60 and 80. You're agreeing with me but arguing.

Quote from uniten View Post :
I was going off the one you linked. So I guess they do have a 2700k version so I'll take that part back. That said, obviously all things have their implications but with the L Prize bulb costing 15$ and the Cree bulb costing 14$, the L Prize bulb is a much much better deal.
Did I link to the 5000K? Again, "much better deal" absurdly assumes that everyone cares about the same thing. It's definitely a "much better deal" if lm/w and CRI are of the utmost importance. It's a much worse deal if you care that your bulb looks "normal" or a longer warranty or shell heat is most critical.

Quote from Laszlo View Post :
We get it. You, personally, prefer the appearance of Cree's bulb to Philip's. You've made over 30 comments in this thread to that effect. Please drop it.
No, you don't get it. I've been clear when I'm expressing my preference, and yet you felt the need to remove factual information I added to the Wiki to help people decide (warranty length and wattage, for example). There's a very good reason the Crees have a lower CRI... they decided to sacrifice it in exchange for a "normal" looking bulb. I've never said this makes the Crees "better"; I've said it is an important thing to note when you decide.

Quote from uniten View Post :
It's plain to see what the Philips bulbs look like. Any potential buyers could see that readily enough in the original deal posting, and I'm sure most Home Depot customers have seen the similar-looking AmbientLEDs in stores over the past few years.
If you research carefully, sure, but someone who just sees the specs and comments can very easily make the mistake of buying the Philips bulbs thinking that they'll be good to use around the house despite the wild look. For some, they are. But I can tell you first hand that many do not. My wife, for example. She picked some up thinking they'd be perfect. Then I put them in some fixtures and found that in cases where they actually fit, you could see the yellow obviously through the glass. I actually didn't mind much, but she was disgusted by the look.

Quote from uniten View Post :
IInstead of discussing the merits of this deal, you've been continually dragging the discussion back to another product, with inferior specs...
There you go again with "inferior specs". Specs include the casing and appearance, heat, size. Who is imposing personal preferences again? The Cree alternative, *for those who put a premium on bulb appearance, heat, size, warranty and don't mind sacrificing the lumens/CRI involved*, is extremely relevant to this deal. Someone would make a huge mistake by purchasing 12 Philips for their house if they underestimated the impact of the look. I'm trying to help by highlighting the importance of the difference, not saying which factors are most important. Read more carefully.
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#232
Quote from handyguy View Post :
Is a daylight bulb for inside your house?
"Daylight" means the color temperature is close to that of noonday sun (about 5000K). In practical terms, it will look a lot whiter than the light from incandescents which are quite yellow. For residential consumers trying to replicate the light of incandescents (2700K, a.k.a. "warm white") or halogens (up to 3000K) the daylight bulbs may look too blue. It comes down to personal preference though. In the US, most will prefer warm white, while international acceptance for 5000K is higher.
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#233
Quote from handyguy View Post :
Is a daylight bulb for inside your house?
There's no correct answer; it's a matter of preference, or in rare cases, function. While "daylight" is more natural, brighter, etc., those terms can confuse people because many people actually perceive the warmer/yellower 2700K as more "normal" because it is what they are used to. To be sure you don't make a mistake, be sure you see both light temps before committing. It's easy to think, "yeah, I definitely want something more natural like real sunlight in my bedroom", only to be shocked by what you think of it once it's in place.
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#234
I love daylight bulb and use it in my desk lamp. My wife likes warm white 2700 Kelvin so rest of the house is now either G7 Power or Philips LED's.
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#235
If you get these subsidized by the utilities, you are still paying for them in terms of higher rates. So one way or the other you pay for them. If they are subsidized and you still do not buy them, then your higher rates will pay for the bulbs that other people buy with the subsidies and you get to be the sucker.
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#236
Quote from DealMayhem View Post :
If you get these subsidized by the utilities, you are still paying for them in terms of higher rates. So one way or the other you pay for them. If they are subsidized and you still do not buy them, then your higher rates will pay for the bulbs that other people buy with the subsidies and you get to be the sucker.
Yes, but like many forms of government distortion on markets, you're forcing other people (non-LED/CFL adopters) to pay most of it for you.
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#237
Quote from DealMayhem View Post :
If you get these subsidized by the utilities, you are still paying for them in terms of higher rates. So one way or the other you pay for them. If they are subsidized and you still do not buy them, then your higher rates will pay for the bulbs that other people buy with the subsidies and you get to be the sucker.
You don't understand why utilities subsidize or how utilities rates are set.
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#238
Quote from Laszlo View Post :
"Daylight" means the color temperature is close to that of noonday sun (about 5000K). In practical terms, it will look a lot whiter than the light from incandescents which are quite yellow. For residential consumers trying to replicate the light of incandescents (2700K, a.k.a. "warm white") or halogens (up to 3000K) the daylight bulbs may look too blue. It comes down to personal preference though. In the US, most will prefer warm white, while international acceptance for 5000K is higher.
Most people assume that everything that isn't "normal" light is that creepy blue 6500K.
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#239
OK, I didn't read through ALL of the posts - but here are my two cents.
This is a great price. They were on sale here in Colorado at that price a few months ago. Not tagged with a sticker saying they were subsidized. I bought some. I was very happy with the light. Not harsh.
I went back for more. Now priced in the $25 to $30 range. I talked with a HD e'ee, who said that at $14 it is below their cost, and subsidized. So if you want 'em, grab 'em!
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#240
Quote from travfar View Post :
CREE 9 watts, 60 watt equiv, 5000K temp, $13.97
Philips 10 watts, 60 watt equiv, 2700K temp, $14.97

CREE lumens per watt is 88, Philips is 94. Basically a wash.
CREE is 5000K versus 2700K. Definitely not a wash.

Overall if you want bright AND white, the CREE wins out.
and if you want brighter and CRI, Philips wins out.
Reply Helpful Comment? 0 0
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