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Probably a stupid question...

topaz 1,042 498 September 8, 2016 at 12:27 PM
The hinge on my laptop has broken so I really can't open and close it and just leave it open all the time. The computer is over 4 years old and has always performed well and still does. Is it possible to get the insides put into a new computer case? I have never heard of it being done but I hate to buy a new computer when this one is fine otherwise.

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#2
Like the same case for the laptop except it's a different one?

You might be able to replace just the hinges on there. Won't be able to know until you open it up. I did this with mine.
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#3
What make & model of laptop? You can buy replacement hinges [amazon.com] (depending on make) on Amazon for pretty cheap
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#4
Quote from boboli View Post :
What make & model of laptop? You can buy replacement hinges [amazon.com] (depending on make) on Amazon for pretty cheap
Right. Depending on your laptop, replacing a hinge is often not too difficult.

It's generally not literally impossible to put your laptop parts in a new case, but you'd need to somehow come up with an identical case and it would be hours and hours of work, so probably not a good bet.
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#5
I wouldn't go as far as hours and hours of work.
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#6
It's unrealistic to put the parts in a "new" case. You probably can't get a plan vanilla chassis for your laptop, and there's a real possibility you'll break something while moving components with the delicate wires found in laptops. You may have issues getting all the thermal connections solidly attached again, etc.

Fortunately the hinge repair is very doable on many machines.

However, IF you cannot replace the hinges you might be able to create a hybrid with another identical laptop that is also broken. Perhaps you can find one being sold "as-is" with a chassis and display in good shape, but something broken with the motherboard, or a dead battery. You might be able to move your motherboard, hard drive, ram, and battery to the "new" laptop and basically bring it back to life. Still, probably too expensive and risky to be worthwhile.
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#7
Assess how bad yours is broken and if a hinge will truly fix it. A lot of times you could probably replace just the hinges and be good-to-go. But you have to be careful that you don't have something else broken in the area that will prevent it -- ie: are the hinge screws any good or did they bust out of one side leaving no where to screw a new hinge into...

Also depending on the laptop, 4 years isn't exactly new but it isn't god awful old, you could be somewhere in the realm of starting to look to other options. Black friday and lots of deals are right around the corner so you might be able to use it short-term and move on to a new device.

Good luck!
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#8
Thanks to all of you. I was afraid the case replacement would be nearly impossible.

This computer is an HP ENVY. It has been a truly super computer...so fast. I think I will try to find a new hinge. Wish me luck.

Again, thanks...I know I can always depend on you all here.
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#9
Would have to agree with most of the comments here. Its easier to fix the hinge rather than find a new case.
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#10
I have experience with repairing many laptop hinges. In most cases, the screws that hold the hinges are screwed into metal rivets that are secured in place by plastic. Once broken, it'll always be weak, even if you manage to glue the plastic back together where the screws go in.

I have fixed this issue simply by drilling through to the bottom of the case and securing the hinges with longer screws and nuts. It isn't the prettiest of things but it definitely gets the job done.
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#11
Quote from stufine View Post :
I wouldn't go as far as hours and hours of work.
Maybe you're faster than me. Or you've had easier laptops? But I've replaced a fair number of laptop motherboards, and that's generally a couple of hours of labor (most of it spent trying to coax very small screws out without losing them and then keeping them sorted.) So I can't really see moving that plus every other part into a new case, and verifying that everything has been reconnected right, in under three hours for me, at least.
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#12
You'd have to 3D print a new case or find a used, for parts only, ebay auction or just slap it in a box and let it slide around. Mounting holes on laptop boards, from what I've seen, are not standard.
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#13
Quote from brbubba View Post :
You'd have to 3D print a new case or find a used, for parts only, ebay auction or just slap it in a box and let it slide around. Mounting holes on laptop boards, from what I've seen, are not standard.
It's not mounting holes on the motherboard, it's using the previous ones that were broke but going all the way through.
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#14
I had a similar situation many years ago. My hinges were broke at the back of the "screen half" of the laptop. Not the bottom (motherboard) side. I found another "screen half" of the laptop on eBay. But honestly, after all the ordering, waiting, installing, etc. I would've been better off buying a new laptop. You can always get a cheap desktop monitor and keyboard/mouse and still use them with your broken laptop.
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