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Samsung EDU/EPP Discount: 2TB Samsung 870 QVO 2.5" MLC V-Nand Internal SSD EXPIRED

$162
$219.99
+ Free Shipping
+37 Deal Score
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Samsung.com offers Eligible Samsung Education / Employee Discount Customers: 2TB Samsung 870 QVO Series 2.5" MLC V-Nand Internal Solid State Drive (MZ-77Q2T0B/AM) on sale for $161.99 when you follow instructions below. Shipping is free.

Thanks community member FrozenBeer for sharing this deal

Deal Instructions:
  1. Sign in with your eligible Samsung account that qualifies for Samsung Education or Employee Perks Program (EPP) Discounts
    • EDU Discount Members: Click here while signed-in to activate your EDU discount
    • EPP Discount Members: Click here while signed-in to activate your EPP discount
  2. Click here for 2TB Samsung 870 QVO Series 2.5" MLC V-Nand Internal Solid State Drive
  3. Add to cart
  4. Proceed to checkout
  5. Your total will be $161.99 + free shipping.
About the Product:
  • 2TB capacity
  • Samsung 4-Bit MLC V-NAND
  • Up to 560 MBps Max Sequential Read Speeds
  • Up to 530 MBps Max Sequential Write Speeds
  • 2.5" SATA Form Factor
  • Improved random access speed/sustained performance

Editor's Notes & Price Research

Written by
  • Price Research: Our research indicates that 2TB Samsung 870 QVO Series 2.5" MLC V-Nand Internal Solid State Drive is $18 less (10% Savings) than the next best price from a reputable merchant with prices starting from $179.99
  • Samsung Return Policy: Eligible for returns within 15-Days of delivery (details).
  • Warranty: Includes 3-Year Warranty
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Original Post

Written by
Edited June 14, 2021 at 01:11 PM by
SAMSUNG 870 QVO SATA III 2.5" SSD 2TB

only $161 with EDU discount Not as good as the Amazon deal from March, but $161 is still pretty decent.

https://www.samsung.com/us/comput...7q2t0b-am/

**warranty is only 3-year**


screenshot of the $161 price on Samsung EDU website attached below:
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Questions & Answers BETA
mrkmrk69 asked this question on 06-14-2021 at 12:00 PM
06-14-2021 at 02:56 PM
more than enough.
Luis19 asked this question on 06-15-2021 at 01:00 PM

45 Comments

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Featured Comments

There's no quality difference in the chips. Flash memory stores data by placing a charge at a certain voltage inside a cell. QLC just uses more voltage levels per cell. SLC has 2 voltage levels (1 bit). MLC has 4 (2 bits). TLC has 8 (3 bits). QLC has 16 (4 bits). And the planned PLC has 32 voltage levels per cell (5 bits).

Because of the finer gradations of voltages at higher bit counts, it's slower to write. You have to be more careful placing the proper charge in the cell, and reading it back. Sometimes they even resort to reading it multiple times, and averaging the result to get the "correct" voltage measurement.

Because the charge slowly leaks out over time, the voltage gradually drops, eventually resulting in data loss. The more bits per cell, the smaller a drop before the data is lost. And the shorter the longevity of the data (unless the drive regularly refreshes the charge, which decreases the lifespan of the cell).

These are all consequences of using more voltage levels per cell. Nothing to do with the chips themselves.

Note that this puts these high-capacity QLC and PLC SSDs between a rock and a hard place. They're too slow for enthusiast use (unless you do a ton of SLC buffering). And they have poor reliability for long-term storage. So if you don't want to use them if you need to fast data access, and you don't want to use them if you need to write a little data and leave it there a long time, what exactly are you supposed to use them for? The caching performance is gonna have to be stellar, or they're going to have to prove its long duration endurance for QLC to be accepted.

The cost savings is not that big a deal either.

Say SLC costs $100 per TB of flash cells (NAND)
MLC would be $50, a $50 savings per GB compared to SLC
TLC would be $33, a $17 savings per GB compared to MLC
QLC would be $25, an $8 savings per GB compared to TLC
PLC would be $20, a $5 savings per GB compared to QLC

QLC is pretty close to the point where I would just rather pay the extra $8 (about $15 at retail) for the better speed and reliability of TLC. (The endurance issues with TLC have largely been canceled out by increases in drive size. A 1 TB SSD has 4x the write endurance of a 250 GB SSD, 8x that of a 125 GB SSD. Maybe that might be a niche for QLC in a decade, when a 10 TB SSD costs $100, and endurance is a non-issue.)
Devil's advocate: because it's cheaper memory and it's not intended to survive enthusiast use like TLC and MLC (higher quality chips). This is a business decision. You wouldn't sell a cow and warrant that it could fly.

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#3
3 Year warranty??
Sounds like they don't have much faith in their drives, why should we?
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#4
Quote from plumbum :
3 Year warranty??
Sounds like they don't have much faith in their drives, why should we?
Devil's advocate: because it's cheaper memory and it's not intended to survive enthusiast use like TLC and MLC (higher quality chips). This is a business decision. You wouldn't sell a cow and warrant that it could fly.
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#5
Good deal except that it's edu only
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#6
The edu loophole was fixed by them awhile back.. Severely limiting any edu deal..
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#7
Quote from tonkotsu :
The edu loophole was fixed by them awhile back.. Severely limiting any edu deal..Nor
The normal employer discount works too, not just edu
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Our community has rated this post as helpful. If you agree, why not thank ?
#8
Quote from SlickDealir :
Devil's advocate: because it's cheaper memory and it's not intended to survive enthusiast use like TLC and MLC (higher quality chips). This is a business decision. You wouldn't sell a cow and warrant that it could fly.
There's no quality difference in the chips. Flash memory stores data by placing a charge at a certain voltage inside a cell. QLC just uses more voltage levels per cell. SLC has 2 voltage levels (1 bit). MLC has 4 (2 bits). TLC has 8 (3 bits). QLC has 16 (4 bits). And the planned PLC has 32 voltage levels per cell (5 bits).

Because of the finer gradations of voltages at higher bit counts, it's slower to write. You have to be more careful placing the proper charge in the cell, and reading it back. Sometimes they even resort to reading it multiple times, and averaging the result to get the "correct" voltage measurement.

Because the charge slowly leaks out over time, the voltage gradually drops, eventually resulting in data loss. The more bits per cell, the smaller a drop before the data is lost. And the shorter the longevity of the data (unless the drive regularly refreshes the charge, which decreases the lifespan of the cell).

These are all consequences of using more voltage levels per cell. Nothing to do with the chips themselves.

Note that this puts these high-capacity QLC and PLC SSDs between a rock and a hard place. They're too slow for enthusiast use (unless you do a ton of SLC buffering). And they have poor reliability for long-term storage. So if you don't want to use them if you need to fast data access, and you don't want to use them if you need to write a little data and leave it there a long time, what exactly are you supposed to use them for? The caching performance is gonna have to be stellar, or they're going to have to prove its long duration endurance for QLC to be accepted.

The cost savings is not that big a deal either.
  • Say SLC costs $100 per TB of flash cells (NAND)
  • MLC would be $50, a $50 savings per GB compared to SLC
  • TLC would be $33, a $17 savings per GB compared to MLC
  • QLC would be $25, an $8 savings per GB compared to TLC
  • PLC would be $20, a $5 savings per GB compared to QLC
QLC is pretty close to the point where I would just rather pay the extra $8 (about $15 at retail) for the better speed and reliability of TLC. (The endurance issues with TLC have largely been canceled out by increases in drive size. A 1 TB SSD has 4x the write endurance of a 250 GB SSD, 8x that of a 125 GB SSD. Maybe that might be a niche for QLC in a decade, when a 10 TB SSD costs $100, and endurance is a non-issue.)
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#9
Military Discount works too.
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#10
Still waiting to replace my 1TB nvme ssd I bought three years ago for $69. Samsung, SK Hynix and Micron please stop colluding to milk the consumer at 1-2TB kkthx. We are ready to be cheated at 4-8TB.
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#11
Quote from plumbum :
3 Year warranty??
Sounds like they don't have much faith in their drives, why should we?
Not sure... but you can also see it as a way to just keep cost down on these budget-friendly SSD's... less time they need to warranty it, the cheaper they can make it, which is the idea behind QVO
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#12
Can this be use as extended hard disk drive for ps5?
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#13
Quote from Solandri :
There's no quality difference in the chips. Flash memory stores data by placing a charge at a certain voltage inside a cell. QLC just uses more voltage levels per cell. SLC has 2 voltage levels (1 bit). MLC has 4 (2 bits). TLC has 8 (3 bits). QLC has 16 (4 bits). And the planned PLC has 32 voltage levels per cell (5 bits).

Because of the finer gradations of voltages at higher bit counts, it's slower to write. You have to be more careful placing the proper charge in the cell, and reading it back. Sometimes they even resort to reading it multiple times, and averaging the result to get the "correct" voltage measurement.

Because the charge slowly leaks out over time, the voltage gradually drops, eventually resulting in data loss. The more bits per cell, the smaller a drop before the data is lost. And the shorter the longevity of the data (unless the drive regularly refreshes the charge, which decreases the lifespan of the cell).

These are all consequences of using more voltage levels per cell. Nothing to do with the chips themselves.

Note that this puts these high-capacity QLC and PLC SSDs between a rock and a hard place. They're too slow for enthusiast use (unless you do a ton of SLC buffering). And they have poor reliability for long-term storage. So if you don't want to use them if you need to fast data access, and you don't want to use them if you need to write a little data and leave it there a long time, what exactly are you supposed to use them for? The caching performance is gonna have to be stellar, or they're going to have to prove its long duration endurance for QLC to be accepted.

The cost savings is not that big a deal either.
  • Say SLC costs $100 per TB of flash cells (NAND)
  • MLC would be $50, a $50 savings per GB compared to SLC
  • TLC would be $33, a $17 savings per GB compared to MLC
  • QLC would be $25, an $8 savings per GB compared to TLC
  • PLC would be $20, a $5 savings per GB compared to QLC
QLC is pretty close to the point where I would just rather pay the extra $8 (about $15 at retail) for the better speed and reliability of TLC. (The endurance issues with TLC have largely been canceled out by increases in drive size. A 1 TB SSD has 4x the write endurance of a 250 GB SSD, 8x that of a 125 GB SSD. Maybe that might be a niche for QLC in a decade, when a 10 TB SSD costs $100, and endurance is a non-issue.)
Hence, they're cheaper (sorry I couldn't type as many words LOL)
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#14
Quote from Solandri :
There's no quality difference in the chips. Flash memory stores data by placing a charge at a certain voltage inside a cell. QLC just uses more voltage levels per cell. SLC has 2 voltage levels (1 bit). MLC has 4 (2 bits). TLC has 8 (3 bits). QLC has 16 (4 bits). And the planned PLC has 32 voltage levels per cell (5 bits).

Because of the finer gradations of voltages at higher bit counts, it's slower to write. You have to be more careful placing the proper charge in the cell, and reading it back. Sometimes they even resort to reading it multiple times, and averaging the result to get the "correct" voltage measurement.

Because the charge slowly leaks out over time, the voltage gradually drops, eventually resulting in data loss. The more bits per cell, the smaller a drop before the data is lost. And the shorter the longevity of the data (unless the drive regularly refreshes the charge, which decreases the lifespan of the cell).

These are all consequences of using more voltage levels per cell. Nothing to do with the chips themselves.

Note that this puts these high-capacity QLC and PLC SSDs between a rock and a hard place. They're too slow for enthusiast use (unless you do a ton of SLC buffering). And they have poor reliability for long-term storage. So if you don't want to use them if you need to fast data access, and you don't want to use them if you need to write a little data and leave it there a long time, what exactly are you supposed to use them for? The caching performance is gonna have to be stellar, or they're going to have to prove its long duration endurance for QLC to be accepted.

The cost savings is not that big a deal either.
  • Say SLC costs $100 per TB of flash cells (NAND)
  • MLC would be $50, a $50 savings per GB compared to SLC
  • TLC would be $33, a $17 savings per GB compared to MLC
  • QLC would be $25, an $8 savings per GB compared to TLC
  • PLC would be $20, a $5 savings per GB compared to QLC
QLC is pretty close to the point where I would just rather pay the extra $8 (about $15 at retail) for the better speed and reliability of TLC. (The endurance issues with TLC have largely been canceled out by increases in drive size. A 1 TB SSD has 4x the write endurance of a 250 GB SSD, 8x that of a 125 GB SSD. Maybe that might be a niche for QLC in a decade, when a 10 TB SSD costs $100, and endurance is a non-issue.)
I just need gaming storage. Is this any good for that?
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#15
Looks like our Cash back site that starts with an R is giving another 10% back bringing this to an all time low of $144 for me
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