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Kidde Firex Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detector $6.32 Home Depot YMMV Clearance

$6.32
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I was in my local Home Depot looking for Wyze closeout deals and while I didn't find any of those, I did stumble upon these combo detectors with the clearance tag for $6.32. Pretty good deal IMO. UPC is 047871097753 which google searches shows as as different product, and Home Depot app can't find the barcode using the scanner. But what I bought looks just like this:

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Kidde.../202026789

The Brickseek for this item is this, but it isn't accurate for my store, still shows as $39.97. So YMMV: https://brickseek.com/home-depot-...=202026789

Found on an endcap Clearance area close to the security camera area.
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Created 01-13-2022 at 11:32 PM by dartmouth01
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#2
Code requires if your home has a HARDWIRED smoke detector that the replacement be HARDWIRED. So unless you have a pretty old home that hasnt been remodeled etc (beore the 80's i think?) then you should probably avoid battery only smoke detectors as a replacement for hardwired.
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#3
Quote from brianmm80 :
Code requires if your home has a HARDWIRED smoke detector that the replacement be HARDWIRED. So unless you have a pretty old home that hasnt been remodeled etc (beore the 80's i think?) then you should probably avoid battery only smoke detectors as a replacement for hardwired.
Isn't the key word there "replacement"? If you want to put additional units up, it shouldn't be a problem.
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#4
Quote from brianmm80 :
Code requires if your home has a HARDWIRED smoke detector that the replacement be HARDWIRED. So unless you have a pretty old home that hasnt been remodeled etc (beore the 80's i think?) then you should probably avoid battery only smoke detectors as a replacement for hardwired.
I understand many newer homes have hardwired (non-battery) detectors, which is great for not having to worry about changing the batteries every year.

However, when it comes to safety equipment, I always try to get redundant detectors sensors/alarms. Having a (separate) battery-power smoke/CO monitor gives me comfort in knowing that *IF* my hardwired detectors fail (due to faulty internal sensor, bad wiring, etc.) I still have the "backup" battery-powered detector(s).

Of course, the battery detector can also be faulty, but the chances of BOTH detectors not working when you need them to is a much smaller probability.
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#5
Yes, code requires all kinds of things...
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#6
Quote from brianmm80 :
Code requires if your home has a HARDWIRED smoke detector that the replacement be HARDWIRED. So unless you have a pretty old home that hasnt been remodeled etc (beore the 80's i think?) then you should probably avoid battery only smoke detectors as a replacement for hardwired.
What code? Building codes are not universal. The state building code for my state has the words battery operated in almost every section and zilch about hardwired.
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#7
Quote from brianmm80 :
Code requires if your home has a HARDWIRED smoke detector that the replacement be HARDWIRED. So unless you have a pretty old home that hasnt been remodeled etc (beore the 80's i think?) then you should probably avoid battery only smoke detectors as a replacement for hardwired.
At this price, put one in every room of the house
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#8
Quote from eChemistry :
I understand many newer homes have hardwired (non-battery) detectors, which is great for not having to worry about changing the batteries every year.

However, when it comes to safety equipment, I always try to get redundant detectors sensors/alarms. Having a (separate) battery-power smoke/CO monitor gives me comfort in knowing that *IF* my hardwired detectors fail (due to faulty internal sensor, bad wiring, etc.) I still have the "backup" battery-powered detector(s).

Of course, the battery detector can also be faulty, but the chances of BOTH detectors not working when you need them to is a much smaller probability.
Important note: Hardwired always have battery backups.
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#9
BS is showing in stock for me at $39 for me . Ymmv waiting for someone else to confirm the deal.
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Quote from YOURNUMBA1FAN :
BS is showing in stock for me at $39 for me . Ymmv waiting for someone else to confirm the deal.
Ditto. Not going on a wild goose chase.
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#11
Quote from eChemistry :
I understand many newer homes have hardwired (non-battery) detectors, which is great for not having to worry about changing the batteries every year.

However, when it comes to safety equipment, I always try to get redundant detectors sensors/alarms. Having a (separate) battery-power smoke/CO monitor gives me comfort in knowing that *IF* my hardwired detectors fail (due to faulty internal sensor, bad wiring, etc.) I still have the "backup" battery-powered detector(s).

Of course, the battery detector can also be faulty, but the chances of BOTH detectors not working when you need them to is a much smaller probability.
I think most if not all wired fire alarms nowadays (sold at Lowes/HomeDepot at least) have battery backup. Even the cheapest Brk $10 one I was looking at yesterday had a battery backup.

Going wired is safer in the sense that the alarms interconnect meaning if one goes off the rest do too.
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#12
Quote from MyDocuments :
Important note: Hardwired always have battery backups.
Quote from AG1802 :
I think most if not all wired fire alarms nowadays (sold at Lowes/HomeDepot at least) have battery backup.

Going wired is safer in the sense that the alarms interconnect meaning if one goes off the rest do too.
I would like to believe that *most* hardwired detectors have battery backups....

However, I can speak from personal experience that my <5 year old home has at least (1) hardwired (non-battery) detector. I only know about it because it went off one day and we couldn't figure out how to make it stop....tried looking for the battery compartment, couldn't find it, then took screw driver and detached the wire. Later searched for the manual, and sure enough, no battery compartment within the diagram.

Moral of the story, check your own detectors. If they have battery backup, great! If not, then getting a secondary (battery) detector might be worth considering.

When in doubt about safety equipment, paying an extra $10-20 for the piece of mind is well worth it, in my opinion.
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#13
Quote from eChemistry :
I understand many newer homes have hardwired (non-battery) detectors, which is great for not having to worry about changing the batteries every year.

However, when it comes to safety equipment, I always try to get redundant detectors sensors/alarms. Having a (separate) battery-power smoke/CO monitor gives me comfort in knowing that *IF* my hardwired detectors fail (due to faulty internal sensor, bad wiring, etc.) I still have the "backup" battery-powered detector(s).

Of course, the battery detector can also be faulty, but the chances of BOTH detectors not working when you need them to is a much smaller probability.
I'm not aware of "hardwired" only detectors, the same code requires hardwired detectors have a battery also.
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#14
Quote from hyhnos13 :
What code? Building codes are not universal. The state building code for my state has the words battery operated in almost every section and zilch about hardwired.
Building codes are nearly universal in the United States. Every state and nearly all (possibly all) US territories adopt or reference the International Building Code and the sub-codes which make it up. Some states adopt it as-is, but many have state amendments to account for local practice or legislative influence by the state Contractor's association(s).

Hardwired detectors in new homes have been code for decades, and starting with the 2018 code, detectors with replaceable batteries are not allowed in remodeling either. The current code requires those homes to be fitted with "permanent" batteries - the battery pre-installed will provide a 10 year operating life, matching the decay life of the Americium radioactive component used for ionization detection in primary alarms. (Photoelectric-only are allowed in some jurisdictions in some locations; I'm a SE not a FP expert so I just know the top-level code stuff)

Of course you can always have more detectors that the minimum, and these might be useful near items with elevated hazards (like 3D printers, storage areas, etc).
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#15
Quote from MyDocuments :
Important note: Hardwired always have battery backups.
Quote from AG1802 :
I think most if not all wired fire alarms nowadays (sold at Lowes/HomeDepot at least) have battery backup.
Quote from brianmm80 :
I'm not aware of "hardwired" only detectors, the same code requires hardwired detectors have a battery also.
Here's the make/model of detector that's in my house. Again, I was just as surprised as the next guy that it doesn't have a battery compartment:

Brand: ESL
Model: 521ncsxt
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