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Nikon Binoculars Sale (Certified Refurbished): 10x30 ProStaff 7S EXPIRED

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First number is magnification,

8x is kinda the sweet spot for normal use (birds and whatnot)
10x is about the max for hand-held use (images can get shaky)
your 20x are probably best for astronomy off a tripod.

second number is the lens diameter.

the bigger the lens diameter = brighter image and larger field of view(i think) but also heavier and bulkier.
Nationwide quarantine + binoculars on sale = exponential rise in peeping Toms

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#4
Nationwide quarantine + binoculars on sale = exponential rise in peeping Toms
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#5
The Monarch 7 8x42 would be a very good binocular for bird watching. The Monarch 5 and Monarch 7 are considered solid binoculars for the field.

You can also check Amazon Warehouse or Renewed for binocular deals.
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#6
Use promo code "Bonus" for free 32gb SanDisk flash drive w/ order
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#7
Quote from polarpenguin
:
The Monarch 7 8x42 would be a very good binocular for bird watching. The Monarch 5 and Monarch 7 are considered solid binoculars for the field.

You can also check Amazon Warehouse or Renewed for binocular deals.
I have the monarch 5 8x42 for bird watching. I wear glasses and they are great
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#8
Can someone please elaborate what two numbers are in binoculats. I had 20X70 Orions that had very good distance
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#9
Quote from qzhyp
:
Can someone please elaborate what two numbers are in binoculats. I had 20X70 Orions that had very good distance
First number is magnification,

8x is kinda the sweet spot for normal use (birds and whatnot)
10x is about the max for hand-held use (images can get shaky)
your 20x are probably best for astronomy off a tripod.

second number is the lens diameter.

the bigger the lens diameter = brighter image and larger field of view(i think) but also heavier and bulkier.
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#10
Quote from elsosdeals
:
First number is magnification,

8x is kinda the sweet spot for normal use (birds and whatnot)
10x is about the max for hand-held use (images can get shaky)
your 20x are probably best for astronomy off a tripod.

second number is the lens diameter.

the bigger the lens diameter = brighter image and larger field of view(i think) but also heavier and bulkier.
Yes, I do remember mine said Orion Astronomical. But I used them for my first Smokies trip and they were amazing
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#11
How do you refurbish binocs? Wipe the fingerprints off the lense?
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#12
Is the 10-22x too much zoom for bird watching? My wife wants to join me while I do bird photography using my crop sensor max 210mm telefoto lens.
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#13
Quote from geoffkin
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How do you refurbish binocs? Wipe the fingerprints off the lense?
you first spit on the lenses and wipe them off :-)
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#14
Quote from qzhyp
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Can someone please elaborate what two numbers are in binoculats. I had 20X70 Orions that had very good distance
First number is magnification; for the Orions the image is 20 times larger through the binoculars. The second number is the diameter of the lens and reflect how much light gets in and how much image you can see. The Orions have a 70mm lens which is big and heavy.

On boats, 7x50 is the usual compromise for how well you can steady it on a moving boat but good in low light. Birdwatchers seem to like like 8x40 or so up to 10x50, The 10x50 are harder to track birds in flight but obviously give more detail. The Orions you have are difficult to handhold steady and tiring to use for long but give lots of detail for looking at the moon or a long distance nesting bird. A tripod would be the thing.

Near me is an osprey pair that returns every year to their nest on a power line tower on the far side of the river. My Celestron 20x80 pair works well to see them.

Edit: Look at that. Basically same answer from Elso I didn't see before I posted.
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Last edited by timsy June 27, 2020 at 08:15 AM.
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#15
Quote from timsy
:
First number is magnification; for the Orions the image is 20 times larger through the binoculars. The second number is the diameter of the lens and reflect how much light gets in and how much image you can see. The Orions have a 70mm lens which is big and heavy.

On boats, 7x50 is the usual compromise for how well you can steady it on a moving boat but good in low light. Birdwatchers seem to like like 8x40 or so up to 10x50, The 10x50 are harder to track birds in flight but obviously give more detail. The Orions you have are difficult to handhold steady and tiring to use for long but give lots of detail for looking at the moon or a long distance nesting bird. A tripod would be the thing.

Near me is an osprey pair that returns every year to their nest on a power line tower on the far side of the river. My Celestron 20x80 pair works well to see them.
Thanks so for general viewing of camping trips, brids or trip to smokies the ones bere are good?
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