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Makita XCV11Z 18V LXT Lithium-Ion Brushless Cordless 2 Gallon HEPA Filter Portable Wet/Dry Dust Extractor/Vacuum, Tool Only at Amazon.com - $134.84 after coupon

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Price: $159.84 & FREE Returns
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Total: $134.84

Item retails for $199 and is out of stock at alot of stores.

More info here: https://www.makitatools.com/produ...ils/XCV11Z


https://www.amazon.com/Makita-XCV...07M8JTDNS/
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#2
It's been this price for a month on Amazon
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#3
Anyone use this? I've got several large wet/dry vacuums that work well but looking to buy something specifically for drywall dust that would pair well with a dedicated drywall sander like that made by Makita or Porter Cable
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#4
Quote from GBAstar
:
Anyone use this? I've got several large wet/dry vacuums that work well but looking to buy something specifically for drywall dust that would pair well with a dedicated drywall sander like that made by Makita or Porter Cable
This is TERRIBLE for drywall dust! HEPA filter clogs immediately and if you don't stop quick , you'll have dust everywhere.

I left mine on location where I was doing some finish carpentry at an art gallery. Came back after lunch and one of the junior art-techs was using this with my Festool ETS125 to sand a 12" patch of drywall overhead. It didn't even get through that one task. The sander was fine, but the vac had zero airflow. I spent 20 minutes trying to knock as much drywall dust as I could out of the filter to get it running again so I could finish my work. It did ok, but that filter was DONE, and I spent more time than I wanted later on trying to get all the gypsum out of the canister as well. The filters are not cheap -- about $30 shipped ($33 right now on amazon). The sander and vacuum otherwise were fine.

CFM's on this Makita are adequate (but not amazing) for a palm sander and small detail trim routing. You can even get away with a couple small track saw cuts (It won't catch everything, but maybe 90% there). I enjoy it for what it is - something I can sling over my shoulder to go do some small work on location without wheeling out larger mobile dust extractors.

If you're doing drywall, I highly recommend the Metabo ASR-35 (which I have used extensively) or the Festool CT36-E -- the E denotes that it's the version with the self-thumping filter. Or really any of the many 9 gallon/ 36 liter vacs that have a self-thumping HEPA filter, allowing it to keep from choking in drywall dust. FLEX manufactures them in different colors for a lot of companies.

However, DO NOT spring for the Makita VC4710. I got burned on that unit. I can confirm the poorer reviews - it seems a lot of those units have something wrong with the air-flow sensor/ controller chip where they get stuck on the filter thumping. I got burned $80 on return shipping for a new unit that thought it was was always clogged even with new filters and nothing attached.

Cheers.
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Last edited by blocky December 1, 2020 at 09:10 AM. Reason: word choice clarity
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#5
Agree with everything blocky said about the XCV11 for the use case you're describing. I'll add on that the hose length on this is only about 2 feet. The only way it even seems possible to use this with a drywall sander is if you get a shoulder strap. And that setup (weight of the vacuum + battery on one shoulder while using both hands to sand drywall) seems destined to absolutely destroy your neck and shoulders -- and once you've done that, whatever money a proper corded vacuum would have cost will feel like nothing.

Beyond that, we have battery life... you'd be stopping to change batteries, running through them hot and fast in an extremely dusty environment. Makita builds good stuff, but that usage will not be good for the batteries long term. Lastly, this has a HEPA filter, but does not bag the dust in any sort of secure way... so when you empty it, you'll get re-exposed to it. The Flex is a good choice here -- it's not as expensive as others, it is less likely to get stolen on a jobsite than something with a Milwaukee or Festool badge on it.

These little vacs are very versatile for small messes in several locations... I have the XCV11 and it's great for that -- I use it much more than I thought I would. But do not mistake it for a dust extractor designed for sustained usage of power tools. For that, you really need a dedicated dust extractor with an automatic or manual filter cleaner (thunker) AND bags if you're doing drywall. A cheaper option is a normal shop-vac with a Dust Deputy cyclone... which does surprisingly well with drywall, but would be very clunky to deal with on a job site IMO. This setup is good enough for a homeowner who wants the cyclone for woodworking and only does occasional drywall work (me)... but not ideal for a professional where time is money.
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#6
Quote from blocky
:
This is TERRIBLE for drywall dust! HEPA filter clogs immediately and if you don't stop quick , you'll have dust everywhere.

I left mine on location where I was doing some finish carpentry at an art gallery. Came back after lunch and one of the junior art-techs was using this with my Festool ETS125 to sand a 12" patch of drywall overhead. It didn't even get through that one task. The sander was fine, but the vac had zero airflow. I spent 20 minutes trying to knock as much drywall dust as I could out of the filter to get it running again so I could finish my work. It did ok, but that filter was DONE, and I spent more time than I wanted later on trying to get all the gypsum out of the canister as well. The filters are not cheap -- about $30 shipped ($33 right now on amazon). The sander and vacuum otherwise were fine.

CFM's on this Makita are adequate (but not amazing) for a palm sander and small detail trim routing. You can even get away with a couple small track saw cuts (It won't catch everything, but maybe 90% there). I enjoy it for what it is - something I can sling over my shoulder to go do some small work on location without wheeling out larger mobile dust extractors.

If you're doing drywall, I highly recommend the Metabo ASR-35 (which I have used extensively) or the Festool CT36-E -- the E denotes that it's the version with the self-thumping filter. Or really any of the many 9 gallon/ 36 liter vacs that have a self-thumping HEPA filter, allowing it to keep from choking in drywall dust. FLEX manufactures them in different colors for a lot of companies.

However, DO NOT spring for the Makita VC4710. I got burned on that unit. I can confirm the poorer reviews - it seems a lot of those units have something wrong with the air-flow sensor/ controller chip where they get stuck on the filter thumping. I got burned $80 on return shipping for a new unit that thought it was was always clogged even with new filters and nothing attached.

Cheers.
Quote from wenzbot
:
Agree with everything blocky said about the XCV11 for the use case you're describing. I'll add on that the hose length on this is only about 2 feet. The only way it even seems possible to use this with a drywall sander is if you get a shoulder strap. And that setup (weight of the vacuum + battery on one shoulder while using both hands to sand drywall) seems destined to absolutely destroy your neck and shoulders -- and once you've done that, whatever money a proper corded vacuum would have cost will feel like nothing.

Beyond that, we have battery life... you'd be stopping to change batteries, running through them hot and fast in an extremely dusty environment. Makita builds good stuff, but that usage will not be good for the batteries long term. Lastly, this has a HEPA filter, but does not bag the dust in any sort of secure way... so when you empty it, you'll get re-exposed to it. The Flex is a good choice here -- it's not as expensive as others, it is less likely to get stolen on a jobsite than something with a Milwaukee or Festool badge on it.

These little vacs are very versatile for small messes in several locations... I have the XCV11 and it's great for that -- I use it much more than I thought I would. But do not mistake it for a dust extractor designed for sustained usage of power tools. For that, you really need a dedicated dust extractor with an automatic or manual filter cleaner (thunker) AND bags if you're doing drywall. A cheaper option is a normal shop-vac with a Dust Deputy cyclone... which does surprisingly well with drywall, but would be very clunky to deal with on a job site IMO. This setup is good enough for a homeowner who wants the cyclone for woodworking and only does occasional drywall work (me)... but not ideal for a professional where time is money.

I appreciate both of your responses; I started out as a handyman, light framing, trim, flooring, kitchen/bathroom remodels so I was only doing drywall work if it was patch in or a few sheets or less, otherwise I'd contract it out to save time and money

For what I was doing I could get by just sanding with a sponge or pole sander (broom handle style).

I've done some bigger projects lately on my own that have required I hang and finish entire areas (basements, attics, etc.).

I quickly learned that wasn't feasible using a sponge even if I got good at not needing to sand until after the second coat.

My only experience with a pole sander is the porter cable version which I know is highly reviewed. I have a lot of respect for festool products (their track saw has saved me many times when needed to cut panels and fillers or trim off extra length on expensive doors) but I cant justify spending Festool type money at the moment.

I was just trying to find a good pole saw and vacuum combination, where the vacuum would be used for drywall dust and only drywall dust.

Looking to spend $300-$600 on the sander and $200-$400 on the vacuum.

I know either device (sander/vac) will absolutely eat batteries but the only downside of my experience with the porter cable setup was the cords between the devices and outlets constantly getting snagged.

That's the second biggest reason (despite being invested in their line) I was looking at Makita 18/36V vacuums, although I'm always hesitant based on reviews
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#7
Quote from blocky
:
This is TERRIBLE for drywall dust! HEPA filter clogs immediately and if you don't stop quick , you'll have dust everywhere.

I left mine on location where I was doing some finish carpentry at an art gallery. Came back after lunch and one of the junior art-techs was using this with my Festool ETS125 to sand a 12" patch of drywall overhead. It didn't even get through that one task. The sander was fine, but the vac had zero airflow. I spent 20 minutes trying to knock as much drywall dust as I could out of the filter to get it running again so I could finish my work. It did ok, but that filter was DONE, and I spent more time than I wanted later on trying to get all the gypsum out of the canister as well. The filters are not cheap -- about $30 shipped ($33 right now on amazon). The sander and vacuum otherwise were fine.

CFM's on this Makita are adequate (but not amazing) for a palm sander and small detail trim routing. You can even get away with a couple small track saw cuts (It won't catch everything, but maybe 90% there). I enjoy it for what it is - something I can sling over my shoulder to go do some small work on location without wheeling out larger mobile dust extractors.

If you're doing drywall, I highly recommend the Metabo ASR-35 (which I have used extensively) or the Festool CT36-E -- the E denotes that it's the version with the self-thumping filter. Or really any of the many 9 gallon/ 36 liter vacs that have a self-thumping HEPA filter, allowing it to keep from choking in drywall dust. FLEX manufactures them in different colors for a lot of companies.

However, DO NOT spring for the Makita VC4710. I got burned on that unit. I can confirm the poorer reviews - it seems a lot of those units have something wrong with the air-flow sensor/ controller chip where they get stuck on the filter thumping. I got burned $80 on return shipping for a new unit that thought it was was always clogged even with new filters and nothing attached.

Cheers.
Wow, thank you for this. I was about to use the one I ordered for some drywall dust cleanup! I am still happy I ordered one, The Funny Carpenter has a couple YouTube videos showing how handy it can be.

I also saw this deal for the past month, the price went up but back down to here. It was even lower by a couple bucks at one point. Good deal if you're looking for one like me.
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#8
Quote from GBAstar
:
I know either device (sander/vac) will absolutely eat batteries but the only downside of my experience with the porter cable setup was the cords between the devices and outlets constantly getting snagged.

That's the second biggest reason (despite being invested in their line) I was looking at Makita 18/36V vacuums, although I'm always hesitant based on reviews
AC Power has a lot of advantages -- infinite runtime, tool-activated trigger on the vac, no compromises on suction, etc. One thing you could do is take an extension cord (same length as your hose), and use either of these setups to permanently couple the extension cord and hose together:

https://www.rockler.com/dust-righ...ps-3-packs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RF7l59b3Yc

Then, remove the factory power cord from the sander, cut it shorter and rewire it into the tool (you can always order a replacement power cord for the tool, in case you want the option of reverting). Now you have just a vacuum hose running to the tool with AC power, that can trigger the vac on and off. No batteries to keep charged, and only one additional tangle point compared to full cordless (the vac power cord).
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#9
Quote from GBAstar
:
I appreciate both of your responses; I started out as a handyman, light framing, trim, flooring, kitchen/bathroom remodels so I was only doing drywall work if it was patch in or a few sheets or less, otherwise I'd contract it out to save time and money

For what I was doing I could get by just sanding with a sponge or pole sander (broom handle style).

I've done some bigger projects lately on my own that have required I hang and finish entire areas (basements, attics, etc.).

I quickly learned that wasn't feasible using a sponge even if I got good at not needing to sand until after the second coat.

My only experience with a pole sander is the porter cable version which I know is highly reviewed. I have a lot of respect for festool products (their track saw has saved me many times when needed to cut panels and fillers or trim off extra length on expensive doors) but I cant justify spending Festool type money at the moment.

I was just trying to find a good pole saw and vacuum combination, where the vacuum would be used for drywall dust and only drywall dust.

Looking to spend $300-$600 on the sander and $200-$400 on the vacuum.

I know either device (sander/vac) will absolutely eat batteries but the only downside of my experience with the porter cable setup was the cords between the devices and outlets constantly getting snagged.

That's the second biggest reason (despite being invested in their line) I was looking at Makita 18/36V vacuums, although I'm always hesitant based on reviews
If you're specifically doing an attic and basement, I'm not sure you need a pole-sander. I'd also hazard you don't need to achieve a Level 5 finish either.

I've done a couple of smaller jobs -- 100' x 8' walls just hitting them lightly with my ETS150ec and some granat 150 grit. A Festool ETS125 runs only about $200, has excellent dust collection, and the rest of your budget could round out the set up with a really good extractor -- that might serve crossover duty with woodworking or future projects.
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#10
This vac is nice but a little overpriced IMO having used it side by side with the older/cheaper milwaukee they're very comparable. That being said I prefer and use it all the time at work remodeling kitchens/baths.
It has become an essential part of my kit during the finishing stages for dust collection on smaller tools and is great for cleaning at the end of the day. Full size vac still comes out if we need dust collection for miter/table/circular indoors.
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#11
Quote from blocky
:
This is TERRIBLE for drywall dust! HEPA filter clogs immediately and if you don't stop quick , you'll have dust everywhere.

I left mine on location where I was doing some finish carpentry at an art gallery. Came back after lunch and one of the junior art-techs was using this with my Festool ETS125 to sand a 12" patch of drywall overhead. It didn't even get through that one task. The sander was fine, but the vac had zero airflow. I spent 20 minutes trying to knock as much drywall dust as I could out of the filter to get it running again so I could finish my work. It did ok, but that filter was DONE, and I spent more time than I wanted later on trying to get all the gypsum out of the canister as well. The filters are not cheap -- about $30 shipped ($33 right now on amazon). The sander and vacuum otherwise were fine.

CFM's on this Makita are adequate (but not amazing) for a palm sander and small detail trim routing. You can even get away with a couple small track saw cuts (It won't catch everything, but maybe 90% there). I enjoy it for what it is - something I can sling over my shoulder to go do some small work on location without wheeling out larger mobile dust extractors.

If you're doing drywall, I highly recommend the Metabo ASR-35 (which I have used extensively) or the Festool CT36-E -- the E denotes that it's the version with the self-thumping filter. Or really any of the many 9 gallon/ 36 liter vacs that have a self-thumping HEPA filter, allowing it to keep from choking in drywall dust. FLEX manufactures them in different colors for a lot of companies.

However, DO NOT spring for the Makita VC4710. I got burned on that unit. I can confirm the poorer reviews - it seems a lot of those units have something wrong with the air-flow sensor/ controller chip where they get stuck on the filter thumping. I got burned $80 on return shipping for a new unit that thought it was was always clogged even with new filters and nothing attached.

Cheers.
This is one of the most helpful comments on SD ever. Thanks so much.
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#12
The Makita XCV11Z is down to 155.17, so I re-ordered mine. I wish Amazon would give us an instant-price match button especially when they haven't shipped yet. It would probably cost them too much money though.
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#13
How does this compare to this:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGI.../206094592

Has different filter replacement options as well.
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#14
Quote from cantsleepyet
:
How does this compare to this:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGI.../206094592

Has different filter replacement options as well.
To me it would come down to what battery system I want to invest in. I already bought into a bunch of Makita 18V so that one made more sense. If you don't have Makita batteries, this looks like a good value. I have a corded Rigid shop vac as my garage vacuum, it works just fine. Only other thing I'd note is the Makita packs up really nice while the Rigid looks like the tools could get knocked off more easily. Also, the Rigid claims 3 gallons capacity over the Makita's 2 gallon.

One other thing I liked about the Rigid shop vac was the variety of filter options. I'm guessing this is similar in that regard.

Neither come with a battery & charger so make sure you are picking that up, probably with a set of tools you also need.
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#15
I have this unit, purchased it in october before this sale. This is a great little unit for me since I was already invested into Makita's world of tools.

This little vac does what I needed it to do, vacuum my car, little messes around the house without having to get out the big shop vac and run power too.

I also got the strap to carry it around the shoulder and got the attachments to shrink nozzle down to accept different heads from Homedepot for like $12
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