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CyberPower Intelligent LCD 1000VA 600W AVR Mini UPS EXPIRED

$80
$114.95
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B&H Photo Video has CyberPower Intelligent LCD 1000VA 600W AVR Mini UPS (CP1000AVRLCD) for $79.95 (price reflected in cart). Shipping is free. Thanks Daskid
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Editor's Notes & Price Research

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  • Output: 1000 VA / 600W; Input: 120V; 5x Battery/Surge Protected Outlets; 9x NEMA 5-15R Outlets; $350,000 Lifetime Connected Equipment Guarantee; Limited 3-Year Warranty.
  • Please refer to the forum thread for additional details & deal discussion. -StrawMan86

Original Post

Written by
Edited March 1, 2020 at 11:45 PM by
Key Features
  • Output: 1000 VA / 600W
  • Input: 120V
  • 5 x Battery/Surge Protected Outlets
  • 9 x NEMA 5-15R Outlets

$35 discount applied in cart

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/pr...r_lcd.html
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It is a simulated sine wave for those wondering.
36 Helpful?

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#3
It is a simulated sine wave for those wondering.
Reply Helpful Comment? 37 1
Last edited by ThomasGoodman March 2, 2020 at 09:29 AM.
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#4
I've had this unit for about two years and it's been great. Took a bit of messing w settings to turn off annoying beeps and bright screen readouts but otherwise it's been rock solid. We use it run to smart home stuff during short power outages - modem/router, smart home bridges, etc.
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#5
Quote from ThomasGoodman
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It is a simulated Sine Wave for those wondering.
Thanks, you'd think anyone posting a deal on these things would know this is the info anyone wants to know.
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#6
Quote from ThomasGoodman
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It is a simulated sine wave for those wondering.
What's the difference /meaning ?
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#7
Quote from istolethisusername
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What's the difference /meaning ?
https://www.minutemanups.com/supp...r_un10.php

This will explain much better than I can. But what most seek is a pure sine wave. It is what your normal power is. Sensitive electronics rely on clean power and this is the best way to assure they are getting it.
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03-02-2020 at 10:03 AM
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#9
Quote from turbodog
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With these units, under normal operation your electronics receive filtered wall AC, just like if they were running on a good power strip. The "simulated sine" is only when the unit has switched to battery power. So if you think a minute or two of imperfect power is going to fry your electronics, I have a tin foil hat to send you.
A simulated sine wave can damage certain electronics. The problem isn't as bad as it used to be as it seems most manufacturers have reduced or eliminated their sensitivity to simulated sine waves. AFAIK there are still devices that can't handle it. I know that many years ago a simulated sine wave could fry a common Dell laptop charger because it happened to me after a few minutes of running said laptop off an automotive inverter.
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#10
Quote from turbodog
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With these units, under normal operation your electronics receive filtered wall AC, just like if they were running on a good power strip. The "simulated sine" is only when the unit has switched to battery power. So if you think a minute or two of imperfect power is going to fry your electronics, I have a tin foil hat to send you.
Ok, but if you're going to spend money to protect your electronics, have a battery back up so you can ensure you don't get caught in the dark, why cheap out a few bucks and get an imperfect delivery system?
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#11
I have a X1 carbon laptop. I don't know if it requires pure sine wave power supply. When I use the power adapter with my car's inverter, it does not provide any power to the laptop. However, when I plug the power adapter into this UPS, it works. How can I tell if the electronic requires pure sine wave or if simulated sine wave will work without plug in and trying it out? Is there any special marking on the power supply?
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03-02-2020 at 10:59 AM
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#13
Quote from BlackLotus777
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Ok, but if you're going to spend money to protect your electronics, have a battery back up so you can ensure you don't get caught in the dark, why cheap out a few bucks and get an imperfect delivery system?
Because it's more than a few bucks and completely unnecessary.

However, I do have a PA system and I prefer to run it off wall power or good quality sine wave generator, no crappy generators. But that's a couple high powered digital amps sucking down tons of power for hours at a time.

"Modified Sine" is just stepping which is basically just full range emi/rfi hash. Any commercial electronic device has enough filtering to handle this hash for a few minutes to allow a safe shutdown.

Both this and any normal "pure sine" cyberpower UPS costing twice as much are "line interactive", meaning they are just feeding your electronics normal filtered and voltage adjusted wall AC all the time.

The type of UPS that freshly generates a sine wave all the time is FAR more expensive.
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Last edited by turbodog March 2, 2020 at 11:21 AM.
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#14
N41 thnx
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#15
Perfect timing because my APC 1500 VA UPS just died the other day after several years, maybe close to 10. I've never used CyberPower before but for $80, I may give it a shot.

I saw this unboxing video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFCfW3uvaGo
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