Frontpage Deal

Korg B2 88-Key Digital Piano (Black)

$359
$720.00
+ Free Shipping
+34 Deal Score
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Adorama has Korg B2 88-Key Digital Piano (Black) for $359. Shipping is free.

Thanks to Deal Editor iconian for finding this deal.
  • Note, price may show $499.99 on product page; it will drop to $359 when you add to cart.
Includes:
  • Korg B2 88-Key Digital Piano
  • AC Adapter
  • Music Rest
  • Damper Pedal
  • Korg 1 Year Limited Warranty

Editor's Notes & Price Research

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  • About this deal:
    • At the time of this posting, our research indicates that this offer is $140.99 lower (28.2% savings) than the next best available price from reputable merchants with prices starting from $499.99.
  • About this item:
    • The B2 is a new generation of digital piano from KORG focused on accessibility and ease of use. Perfect as a first piano for a new player, we've paid special attention to the experience of playing a real piano. B2 is packed with carefully selected sounds, starting with legendary grand pianos from around the world. Software and a variety of connectors come standard for a truly modern piano experience.
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Edited May 3, 2021 at 12:13 PM by
deal [adorama.com]

$359 + free s/h @ adorama (price drops in cart)

matches previous FP deal.
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Created 04-30-2021 at 02:52 PM by iconian
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Alright, so to clarify "Hammer Gradation" for the newbies.

In a normal piano you have a hammer, but in between you have several more levers to activate other contraptions that make the piano work.

On the bass strings, the hammers are larger, on the treble strings, the hammers are smaller. This is where the gradation comes from. But this is an artifact of acoustic pianos, it's NOT a desirable trait or has any useful purpose. When a professional regulates the key action their goal is to make ALL the keys feel as EVEN and close in weight as possible, if they COULD make every key weigh the same, they would, because that would provide the most predictable and equal feedback.

On digital they use this minor feature as an upsell, it's not exactly a right or wrong situation, but there's absolutely NO NEED to have gradation. All the way up to $3000, the gradation is only 4 zones. Which means you have 4 sets of weights only. They are not individually graded until $3000+. So with respect to all the pianos below that range, it's a GIMMICK. On a well regulated Grand piano, the gradation difference is also really small and inconsequential somewhere between 70g on the bass to ~55-60 on the treble

In actual performance, the GOAL is to have as predictable an action as possible, This is why digital pianos are already the IDEALIZED version of the action. because it's much more uniform and consistent performing. That may detract from the simulation if that is what you're after, but the simplified digital action is overall the better action in terms of input control. If you want a good sim, you want to look at hybrid pianos like the Casio GP510, Novus 10, N1X, N2,N3

Hammer action just refers to a counterweight system, instead of a Spring Only system. This is uniform and like I mentioned before MOST $300 pianos are equipped with this feature, you can check reviews to make sure, but it's not terribly special.

LETOFF / Escapement simulation. what is it.

On an acoustic piano the letoff is when the jack disengages from the hammer so the hammer swings free of the action. It's a very minute tactile sensation at the end of the keystroke about 7-8mm down out of ~10.5mm total. It feels like a little notch/bump. That's all it is. On an acoustic piano this HAS to occur to release the hammer, otherwise the hammer will bounce back and bobble on the string. On a digital piano, it's again A GIMMICK and completely unnecessary.

For example, Nord stage pianos, these are $2000-5000 kits, they use kawai's RH3 action, but they modify it by REMOVING the letoff.

WHY, because the letoff doesn't do anything at all on a digital piano, and it actually makes the action HARDER to control, and less consistent.

Some enthusiats who buy digital pianos with letoff sims actually go in and cut them off to remove the letoff. This makes the travel more consistent/smoother and more predictable.


I hope you guys enjoyed this talk on actions.
Pianodreamers is a copy writer site, It's basically useless except for very general information, it's like those 10 best shavers articles except for piano. laugh out loud

DO NOT base any purchase decisions on the review of that site.

It's not like Rtings where they actually use professional measurement tools to derive real evidence based comparisons, Piano dreamers just regurgitates the numbers written on brochures, very superficial.

Hammer action just means it has a moving counterweight instead of springs only, Most pianos in the $300 range actually have this. The graded thing is a gimmick as well, it makes virtually no difference to the playing. On real acoustic pianos, the gradation is done to make every key as CLOSE in weight as possible. It's impossible to do given larger and smaller hammers, but that's where the idea of graded comes from, it's NOT a desirable feature in the general operation of the keys.

Bluetooth is a convenience feature for people who don't want to run cables, but I assure you it's often very laggy and unsuitable for piano apps. Almost all piano apps allow the use of otg/usb/lightning midi connection to device for lag free input..


The B2 is the bread and butter @ slickdeals for entry lvl, best value anywhere at $360.

Though we'd like to see it hit $300 at some point. Big Grin


PHA4 roland is a heavy action, it's a bit harder to tame for fast passages and high repetition. The roland engine often drops fast trills, not an issue for beginners, but down the line there are some oddities that you'll have to work around playing their system.

Pha4 is not a bad action, but know its limitations, it's on the sluggish side vs Kawai's RHC / RHC2 / RH3 actions in, models Es110/520/920

I think the kawai models, and the NW in this B2 along with yamaha's GHS in p45/125 dgx670 are more suitable for beginners.
If you register your Korg keyboard, keyboard rack module or digital piano online within 90 days of purchase, Korg will extend your Korg manufacturer's warranty for an extra year for free if purchased from a Korg authorized dealer. A copy of the registration confirmation email and a legible copy of the product's sales receipt from the authorized dealer are both required for extended warranty service. To register your Korg product, please click http://i.korg.com/Register

Reps appreciated if you find this helpful

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#3
Here's a review:
https://www.pianodreamers.com/korg-b2-review/

TL;DR: It isn't a Roland PHA-4 action, but it ain't bad and certainly head and shoulders above other digital pianos around $350 (many of which aren't even hammer action, let alone graded). It lacks Bluetooth which if you've never used it, seems like a "and kitchen-sink" feature, but there are actually dozens of really fantastic apps that require the Bluetooth to function (educational, recording/sharing, accompaniment, etc).
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#4
Quote from UnoriginalGuy :
Here's a review:
https://www.pianodreamers.com/korg-b2-review/

TL;DR: It isn't a Roland PHA-4 action, but it ain't bad and certainly head and shoulders above other digital pianos around $350 (many of which aren't even hammer action, let alone graded). It lacks Bluetooth which if you've never used it, seems like a "and kitchen-sink" feature, but there are actually dozens of really fantastic apps that require the Bluetooth to function (educational, recording/sharing, accompaniment, etc).
Pianodreamers is a copy writer site, It's basically useless except for very general information, it's like those 10 best shavers articles except for piano. laugh out loud

DO NOT base any purchase decisions on the review of that site.

It's not like Rtings where they actually use professional measurement tools to derive real evidence based comparisons, Piano dreamers just regurgitates the numbers written on brochures, very superficial.

Hammer action just means it has a moving counterweight instead of springs only, Most pianos in the $300 range actually have this. The graded thing is a gimmick as well, it makes virtually no difference to the playing. On real acoustic pianos, the gradation is done to make every key as CLOSE in weight as possible. It's impossible to do given larger and smaller hammers, but that's where the idea of graded comes from, it's NOT a desirable feature in the general operation of the keys.

Bluetooth is a convenience feature for people who don't want to run cables, but I assure you it's often very laggy and unsuitable for piano apps. Almost all piano apps allow the use of otg/usb/lightning midi connection to device for lag free input..


The B2 is the bread and butter @ slickdeals for entry lvl, best value anywhere at $360.

Though we'd like to see it hit $300 at some point. Big Grin


PHA4 roland is a heavy action, it's a bit harder to tame for fast passages and high repetition. The roland engine often drops fast trills, not an issue for beginners, but down the line there are some oddities that you'll have to work around playing their system.

Pha4 is not a bad action, but know its limitations, it's on the sluggish side vs Kawai's RHC / RHC2 / RH3 actions in, models Es110/520/920

I think the kawai models, and the NW in this B2 along with yamaha's GHS in p45/125 dgx670 are more suitable for beginners.
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Last edited by xtp April 30, 2021 at 04:15 PM.
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Joined Jul 2008
Howdy.
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#5
If you register your Korg keyboard, keyboard rack module or digital piano online within 90 days of purchase, Korg will extend your Korg manufacturer's warranty for an extra year for free if purchased from a Korg authorized dealer. A copy of the registration confirmation email and a legible copy of the product's sales receipt from the authorized dealer are both required for extended warranty service. To register your Korg product, please click http://i.korg.com/Register

Reps appreciated if you find this helpful
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#6
How does Adorama's pricing work? Why is this a price I cannot reproduce without using the link?
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#7
Man, it's a shame there's not a deal on popcorn for reading the comments.
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#8
Quote from diggie :
Man, it's a shame there's not a deal on popcorn for reading the comments.
Wish I could be that passionate abojt something.
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#9
Can anyone recommend a good place to get a stand and bench for this?
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#10
Quote from stevemaximus :
Can anyone recommend a good place to get a stand and bench for this?
I am using this stand from amazon. Pretty good quality
https://www.amazon.com/Pyle-Keybo...s9dHJ1ZQ==
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#11
Good piano, got it from the last deal @ this price. 0 remorse, sounds and plays beautiful. I was worried about the "white noise " complaints but when I plugged it up it clearly was not an issue, anyone who compains about it might have some OCD and seek medical help. Not even joking, its almost inaudible white noise
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#12
Quote from MoeMoo :
Good piano, got it from the last deal @ this price. 0 remorse, sounds and plays beautiful. I was worried about the "white noise " complaints but when I plugged it up it clearly was not an issue, anyone who compains about it might have some OCD and seek medical help. Not even joking, its almost inaudible white noise
Do you hear a noise at the end of each note when playing in harpsichord? There is like an electrical clipping noise at the end of each note. Don't know if that's my issue or just how harpsichord are supposed to sound.
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#13
Quote from XtraCrispi :
Do you hear a noise at the end of each note when playing in harpsichord? There is like an electrical clipping noise at the end of each note. Don't know if that's my issue or just how harpsichord are supposed to sound.
Just checked for you on mine, no clipping sound for my harpsichord, even put my ear close to the speakers. Its a smooth note. Probably an issue you can use ur warrant on but not sure if harpsichord is even important to you
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#14
Quote from XtraCrispi :
Do you hear a noise at the end of each note when playing in harpsichord? There is like an electrical clipping noise at the end of each note. Don't know if that's my issue or just how harpsichord are supposed to sound.
These budget sets use looped samples, and sometimes depending on how the effects are set on your piano, it could clip the loop. But harpsichord in general has mechanical noise, so it could just be part of the recording.

If you record it maybe we can listen to it. but try playing with the reverb and other effect settings see if that changes things.
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#15
Alright, so to clarify "Hammer Gradation" for the newbies.

In a normal piano you have a hammer, but in between you have several more levers to activate other contraptions that make the piano work.

On the bass strings, the hammers are larger, on the treble strings, the hammers are smaller. This is where the gradation comes from. But this is an artifact of acoustic pianos, it's NOT a desirable trait or has any useful purpose. When a professional regulates the key action their goal is to make ALL the keys feel as EVEN and close in weight as possible, if they COULD make every key weigh the same, they would, because that would provide the most predictable and equal feedback.

On digital they use this minor feature as an upsell, it's not exactly a right or wrong situation, but there's absolutely NO NEED to have gradation. All the way up to $3000, the gradation is only 4 zones. Which means you have 4 sets of weights only. They are not individually graded until $3000+. So with respect to all the pianos below that range, it's a GIMMICK. On a well regulated Grand piano, the gradation difference is also really small and inconsequential somewhere between 70g on the bass to ~55-60 on the treble

In actual performance, the GOAL is to have as predictable an action as possible, This is why digital pianos are already the IDEALIZED version of the action. because it's much more uniform and consistent performing. That may detract from the simulation if that is what you're after, but the simplified digital action is overall the better action in terms of input control. If you want a good sim, you want to look at hybrid pianos like the Casio GP510, Novus 10, N1X, N2,N3

Hammer action just refers to a counterweight system, instead of a Spring Only system. This is uniform and like I mentioned before MOST $300 pianos are equipped with this feature, you can check reviews to make sure, but it's not terribly special.

LETOFF / Escapement simulation. what is it.

On an acoustic piano the letoff is when the jack disengages from the hammer so the hammer swings free of the action. It's a very minute tactile sensation at the end of the keystroke about 7-8mm down out of ~10.5mm total. It feels like a little notch/bump. That's all it is. On an acoustic piano this HAS to occur to release the hammer, otherwise the hammer will bounce back and bobble on the string. On a digital piano, it's again A GIMMICK and completely unnecessary.

For example, Nord stage pianos, these are $2000-5000 kits, they use kawai's RH3 action, but they modify it by REMOVING the letoff.

WHY, because the letoff doesn't do anything at all on a digital piano, and it actually makes the action HARDER to control, and less consistent.

Some enthusiats who buy digital pianos with letoff sims actually go in and cut them off to remove the letoff. This makes the travel more consistent/smoother and more predictable.


I hope you guys enjoyed this talk on actions.
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Last edited by xtp May 1, 2021 at 06:31 PM.
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