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DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner EXPIRED

$779
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Home Depot has DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner & Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter w/ WiFi (DA1221-H2) for $779. Shipping is free.

Thanks to community member david3808 for finding this deal.

Included:
  • Copper tubing w/ insulation and nuts
  • Control wire
  • 6' drain hose
  • Wall sleeve
  • Wall sleeve cover and tape

Editor's Notes & Price Research

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  • About this product:
    • Rated 4.9 stars out of 5 overall based on 900+ reviews on Home Depot
    • 2-direction air vane
    • Built-in electronic diagnostic monitoring
    • Dual washable filters
  • About this store:
    • Home Depot Return Policy may be found here
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Edited May 22, 2021 at 05:15 PM by
Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars on Home Depot (931 reviews)
Pre-charged condenser for the DIYers

2 part installation video.
part 1: https://youtu.be/iFBmh29GezU
part 2: https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw

part 2 walks you through checking lines for leaks and vacuuming:
https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw?t=516

Installation Manual - page 29 has the Air Evacuation instructions:
https://ductlessaire.com/wp-conte...lation.pdf

15% to 28% off
$697 - 21 SEER 9, 000 BTU 0.75 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump - 230-Volt/60 Hz OOS
$779 - 21 SEER 12,000 BTU 1 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$999 - 19 SEER 24000 BTU 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220-Volt
$1019 - 21 SEER 18,000 BTU 1.5 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$1199 - 21 SEER 24,000 BTU Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz

https://www.homedepot.com/Special...uyOfTheDay
  • 21.5 SEER rating ENERGY STAR certified: estimated national average annual operating cooling cost is 70 USD based on AHRI certificate #9150138
  • Package includes: stylishly designed interior white wall-mount air handler with LED display; exterior pre-charged condenser with special golden anti-corrosive coating coils; wireless remote control for customizable airflow and temperature adjustment; 25 ft. complete kit
  • 25 ft. kit includes: copper tubing with insulation and nuts, control wire, 6 ft. drain hose, wall sleeve, wall sleeve cover and tape
  • Electroplated coils: the electroplated hydrophilic coils improve heating efficiency by accelerating the defrosting process; the unique anti-corrosive coating on the coils also aids in withstanding the effects of salty air, rain and other corrosive elements by allowing contaminated water on the coils to run off more quickly, reducing the corrosive effect to the coils; heat exchange performance is much longer lasting
  • Low ambient operation: a special built-in low ambient kit can be used in temperatures as low as 5°F for cooling operation, useful for users who need to maintain cooling during winter
  • Refrigerant leak detection: with this new technology, the system will alarm when a refrigerant leak is detected
  • Dual sensor fixed or remote: by switching to remote sensor and keeping the remote close to you, you tell the air conditioner to set the temperature from wherever the remote happens to be, this counteracts the tendency for the air conditioner to stop cooling or heating because the air around the unit has reached its set temperature (switches off after period of inactivity to preserve battery life)
  • HEPA filter included (1): a HEPA filter is a type of mechanical air filter; it works by forcing air through a fine mesh that traps harmful particles such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites and tobacco smoke
  • 2-direction air vane technology: in cooling mode the air vane opens counterclockwise to direct air horizontally, allowing for an even cooling effect; in heating mode the air vane opens clockwise, directing air downward, this time for a uniform heating effect
  • Built-in electronic diagnostic: monitoring some abnormal operations or parts failures, microcomputer of the air conditioner will switch off and protect the system automatically; meanwhile, the error or protection code will be displayed on the indoor unit
  • Outdoor pan heater: a heating belt is fitted on the base plate of the outdoor unit to avoid accumulation of rain, snow or water on the base plate
  • Dual washable filters: a good air conditioner should not only take care of the temperature in your home but also the quality of the air you breathe; the system aids in removing most of the pollen dust, smoke and other microscopic airborne particles that by latest thinking contribute to respiratory problems like asthma and hay fever
  • Self-cleaning: by pressing clean on the remote control, it automatically cleans the evaporator to aid in reducing buildup of bacteria and keeps the air fresh
  • Sleep mode: in sleep mode, the unit automatically decreases the heating or increases the cooling by 1° per hour for the first 2 hours of use, then holds the temperature steady for 5 hours before ceasing
  • Low noise airflow system: without decreasing the airflow volume and capacity output, the large-diameter cross flow fan can bring down the indoor unit noise level by lowering the fan speed
  • Anti-cold draft: if the unit is turned on in heat mode when the ambient temperature is low, it will warm up prior to fan operation to prevent cold air in heating mode
  • Louver position memory: the set louver position is stored in memory by the microcomputer and the louver returns to the stored position when the next operation is performed
  • Turbo mode: this function enables the unit to reach the preset temperature in the shortest time
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Questions & Answers BETA
Balayya_Fan asked this question on 05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.

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I bought a 2-head Senville 22 SER unit last month and came to the conclusion it makes sense to install it myself versus paying an installer. I too am in Los Angeles.

This works if you're handy since you'll probably do a better job. Doing things like a nitrogen pressure test, which aren't stated in the manual, is a good practice that many installers will skip unless it's explicitly stated in the manual like in some Mitsubishi units. This practice makes sense for heat pump R410A units which will see upwards of 450 psi on the head when in heat pump mode. But expect to spend $500-$700 on tools if you want to do it right.

Edit: if you want me to comment more on the tools I went with, let me know.
Edit Edit: As promised, I posted my tools breakdown reply on #99 of this thread, but I'm also going to post it below too. If this angers the mods then please remove post #99.



Everyone can decide what you need for your install versus others, but here's the tools that I bought for mine:


Nitrogen Tank w/ Regulator (got on Craigslist)1 $ 100.00
Appion CTEE14 MegaSeal Low-Loss Charging T-Fitting - 1/4'1 $ 49.94
Appion MGAVCR Mega Flow Vacuum Rated Valve Core Removal Tool – 5/16" System Connection1 $ 48.48
CPS VG200: Vacuum Micron Gauge with Digital LCD Display1 $ 146.21
Refrigeration Technologies RT201B Nylog Gasket/Thread Sealant1 $ 10.25
Yellow Jacket 42004 Series 41 Manifold with 3-1/8" Gauge, psi, R-22/404A/410A1 $ 112.29
Yellow Jacket 19173 R-410 5/16" to 1/4" coupler w/ schrader valve.1 $ 14.26
CPS Pro-Set R410A Flare Gauge1 $ 19.81
CPS BLACKMAX BFT850 Ultra-Lightweight R-410A Clutch-Type Ecentric Flaring Tool1 $ 130.03
Reed Tool DEBO Pencil Shape Deburring Tool for Copper1$11.68
RIDGID 32975 Model 103 Close Quarters Tubing Cutter, 1/8-inch to 5/8-inch Tube Cutter , Silver , Small1$12.67
Johnsen's 6915 Vacuum Pump Oil - 12 oz.1 $ 9.79
PITTSBURGH AUTOMOTIVE 3 CFM Two Stage Vacuum Pump1 $ 149.99
PITTSBURGH 3/8 In. Metric Crowfoot Wrench Set, 7 Pc.1 $ 9.99

For mine, it was a total of $825-ish, with it being more like $900 after tax. But I bought multiple things that most people don't need to buy, marked in italics, so you can save a lot of money skipping these. These optional tools represent an additional $372.61 ($400.55 after tax, at least where I live) you can eliminate about 50% from the tools budget.

First and foremost, don't attempt to work with electrical or HVAC unless you're pretty comfortable with DIY projects.

The Nitrogen tank is optional for pressure testing. Some say if you can pull a good vacuum and let it sit for a while that is "good enough" and most company's instructions exclude this from the installation instructions. But it's worth considering because when running R-410A in heat pump mode, you'll get high pressure across your head side of the loop. This makes sense because the high-pressure side = heat. So in my head it made sense you'd want to do a pressurization test and a vacuum down test, since one is pushing apart the fittings (pressure) and the other is sucking them together (vacuum). Since the fittings will all be exposed to both types of pressures it makes sense for me. Follow Dakine or Mitsubishi installation manual instructions for nitrogen pressure testing if you opt to do it. Note that most professional installers WILL SKIP THIS unless it's a unit that requires it (think Mitsubishi) and the installer is one of their "diamond" approved installers or whatever.

Secondly, I bought a flaring tool because I had a 2-head system and cut the tubing to fit the installation and make it more tidy. This is optional and I do not recommend it unless you know what you're doing. It also saves money to skip this. Before cutting, you need to make sure your run or runs have the required length to prevent overcharging the system. If you have a single head unit and end up cutting the tubes to 1/2 the length you may have too much refrigerant in the linesets. Refer to your manual or talk to the company before you decide to do this. And if you decide to do it anyways, yes it must be a HVAC specific flaring tool. Get one with the clutch system to prevent overtightening the flare press and make it foolproof. R-410A runs at too high of pressures to get away with subpar flares. Deciding to just accept the standard length of the copper tubing eliminates the costs associated with the Flaring tool, flaring gauge, deburring tool, and pipe cutting tool.

As for the rest, you do not NEED a digital micron gauge, many just use their normal gauge set's low pressure side gage and watch to see if the needle moves. This will also work. Again I wanted to go with professional duty equipment to get an install I'm 100% confident in. That way if the thing dies in a few years I won't have wonder in the back of my mind whether I screwed up the install. I know 100% my install was perfect. I went with the Yellow Jacket brand gauges, although you could in theory just get the low side gauge, hose, and valve if you're just pulling vacuum and save some money. I'm sure the garden variety chinesium brand gauges are probably perfectly fine for a solo install and will cut the cost in half for them.

The Appion Schrader core removal tool and the t-valve are totally optional too. You'd have to do some youtubing to see how they're used, but here's a great video which shows essentially the same setup I bought: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81EeY7SFYJc

But you can skip those tools and just use the Yellow Jacket 5/16" to 1/4" adapter and be just fine without them. Your pressure drawdown will just take a bit longer since you're going through the Schrader valve, and you'll loose a tiny bit of refrigerant before the schrader valve closes. Skipping these tools will save you $130-$140.

For the vacuum pump I went with a harbor freight 3CFM rated 2-stage vacuum pump. I believe it's rated for sub-30 microns of vacuum which is great, and a review on their site showed a guy pulling 13 microns if I recall correctly. To put this into perspective most manufacturers suggest pulling below 500 microns before charging the system. This is slightly overkill but it works for me.

Lastly I already have a torque wrench but you can get them dirt cheap from harbor freight, and I bought some crowfoot wrenches to use with my torque wrench to torque the bolts to the manufacturer's specifications. Will it really matter if you don't do it to spec? I don't know but I'm not finding out.

Then beyond all of this you'll have to run some 220-240v and have a disconnect box by your run. If you're not a confident DIY'er don't go for this, but if you are then just watch plenty of videos of installations, follow the instructions, and you'll be fine.
Having a precharged condenser is no big deal; I believe all mini splits are sold that way. In fact, large (residential) ducted A/Cs ship that way as well. But to DIY this, you'll need a vacuum pump to evacuate the air from the line set before you release the refrigerant. I have done a couple of installs of mini splits (not this brand), and it's not that difficult, but you do need to understand exactly what you're doing. Do some reading before you decide to buy this.
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.

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#3
Seems like a good deal. Does anyone know how these compare to the MRCOOL DIY units?
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#4
What are cons of these units in basement?
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#5
Having a precharged condenser is no big deal; I believe all mini splits are sold that way. In fact, large (residential) ducted A/Cs ship that way as well. But to DIY this, you'll need a vacuum pump to evacuate the air from the line set before you release the refrigerant. I have done a couple of installs of mini splits (not this brand), and it's not that difficult, but you do need to understand exactly what you're doing. Do some reading before you decide to buy this.
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#6
Quote from Balayya_Fan :
What are cons of these units in basement?
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.
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#7
i want one of these but dont know how to install them! i tried angies list but they get me the central air install people ...in other words more money for installation. anyone know where cheap install places or people are? in the los angeles area? thanks!
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#8
Quote from swechsler :
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.
Installer will take care of that right? Do I need to run de humidifier with these?
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#9
Quote from Balayya_Fan :
What are cons of these units in basement?
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
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#10
Why is the 9000 btu unit 230V? Current rating only 4A. I put in an ebay unit 15 years ago rated 120V, and just plugs in the wall. Yes the lineset goes through wall, but didn't have to run electrical and use up 2 breaker slots.
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#11
Quote from swechsler :
Having a precharged condenser is no big deal; I believe all mini splits are sold that way. In fact, large (residential) ducted A/Cs ship that way as well. But to DIY this, you'll need a vacuum pump to evacuate the air from the line set before you release the refrigerant. I have done a couple of installs of mini splits (not this brand), and it's not that difficult, but you do need to understand exactly what you're doing. Do some reading before you decide to buy this.
Also, unlike the Mr. Cool brand that is set up for DIY w/ pre-charged lines, I'm sure you would void warranty by installing the unit from this deal yourself vs having a pro do it (but don't let that stop you if self-install saves big money).

Edit: not sure why the thumbs down, I'm not wrong. You void warranty doing it yourself. The only brand that I know that allows self-installs without killing warranty is the DIY models of the Mr. Cool brand, and that's because the lines themselves come evacuated & pre-charged and have special valves on the ends that stay sealed until install. They also charge a large premium for the DIY versions, basically insurance (see https://www.homedepot.com/p/MRCOO.../313421856)
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Last edited by luddite_cyborg May 22, 2021 at 07:43 PM.
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#12
Quote from flunder :
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
So both pieces need a 220v to power and not just the inside one?
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#13
dup post
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#14
Quote from foxfai :
So both pieces need a 220v to power and not just the inside one?
You should be able to run the line directly from the indoor unit to the outdoor one, although there should be a quick disconnect panel near the outdoor unit. They can both be on the same circuit.

The fact that the 9000 BTU unit requires a 230V line tells me that this may not be designed for the US market.
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#15
Quote from Balayya_Fan :
Installer will take care of that right? Do I need to run de humidifier with these?
Yes. No, you shouldn't run a dehumidifier at the same time as the A/C, since a dehumidifier is essentially an air conditioner that doesn't exhaust the hot air outside.
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