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DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner EXPIRED

$779
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Home Depot has DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner & Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter w/ WiFi (DA1221-H2) for $779. Shipping is free.

Thanks to community member david3808 for finding this deal.

Included:
  • Copper tubing w/ insulation and nuts
  • Control wire
  • 6' drain hose
  • Wall sleeve
  • Wall sleeve cover and tape
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Edited May 22, 2021 at 05:15 PM by
Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars on Home Depot (931 reviews)
Pre-charged condenser for the DIYers

2 part installation video.
part 1: https://youtu.be/iFBmh29GezU
part 2: https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw

part 2 walks you through checking lines for leaks and vacuuming:
https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw?t=516

Installation Manual - page 29 has the Air Evacuation instructions:
https://ductlessaire.com/wp-conte...lation.pdf

15% to 28% off
$697 - 21 SEER 9, 000 BTU 0.75 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump - 230-Volt/60 Hz OOS
$779 - 21 SEER 12,000 BTU 1 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$999 - 19 SEER 24000 BTU 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220-Volt
$1019 - 21 SEER 18,000 BTU 1.5 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$1199 - 21 SEER 24,000 BTU Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz

https://www.homedepot.com/Special...uyOfTheDay
  • 21.5 SEER rating ENERGY STAR certified: estimated national average annual operating cooling cost is 70 USD based on AHRI certificate #9150138
  • Package includes: stylishly designed interior white wall-mount air handler with LED display; exterior pre-charged condenser with special golden anti-corrosive coating coils; wireless remote control for customizable airflow and temperature adjustment; 25 ft. complete kit
  • 25 ft. kit includes: copper tubing with insulation and nuts, control wire, 6 ft. drain hose, wall sleeve, wall sleeve cover and tape
  • Electroplated coils: the electroplated hydrophilic coils improve heating efficiency by accelerating the defrosting process; the unique anti-corrosive coating on the coils also aids in withstanding the effects of salty air, rain and other corrosive elements by allowing contaminated water on the coils to run off more quickly, reducing the corrosive effect to the coils; heat exchange performance is much longer lasting
  • Low ambient operation: a special built-in low ambient kit can be used in temperatures as low as 5°F for cooling operation, useful for users who need to maintain cooling during winter
  • Refrigerant leak detection: with this new technology, the system will alarm when a refrigerant leak is detected
  • Dual sensor fixed or remote: by switching to remote sensor and keeping the remote close to you, you tell the air conditioner to set the temperature from wherever the remote happens to be, this counteracts the tendency for the air conditioner to stop cooling or heating because the air around the unit has reached its set temperature (switches off after period of inactivity to preserve battery life)
  • HEPA filter included (1): a HEPA filter is a type of mechanical air filter; it works by forcing air through a fine mesh that traps harmful particles such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites and tobacco smoke
  • 2-direction air vane technology: in cooling mode the air vane opens counterclockwise to direct air horizontally, allowing for an even cooling effect; in heating mode the air vane opens clockwise, directing air downward, this time for a uniform heating effect
  • Built-in electronic diagnostic: monitoring some abnormal operations or parts failures, microcomputer of the air conditioner will switch off and protect the system automatically; meanwhile, the error or protection code will be displayed on the indoor unit
  • Outdoor pan heater: a heating belt is fitted on the base plate of the outdoor unit to avoid accumulation of rain, snow or water on the base plate
  • Dual washable filters: a good air conditioner should not only take care of the temperature in your home but also the quality of the air you breathe; the system aids in removing most of the pollen dust, smoke and other microscopic airborne particles that by latest thinking contribute to respiratory problems like asthma and hay fever
  • Self-cleaning: by pressing clean on the remote control, it automatically cleans the evaporator to aid in reducing buildup of bacteria and keeps the air fresh
  • Sleep mode: in sleep mode, the unit automatically decreases the heating or increases the cooling by 1° per hour for the first 2 hours of use, then holds the temperature steady for 5 hours before ceasing
  • Low noise airflow system: without decreasing the airflow volume and capacity output, the large-diameter cross flow fan can bring down the indoor unit noise level by lowering the fan speed
  • Anti-cold draft: if the unit is turned on in heat mode when the ambient temperature is low, it will warm up prior to fan operation to prevent cold air in heating mode
  • Louver position memory: the set louver position is stored in memory by the microcomputer and the louver returns to the stored position when the next operation is performed
  • Turbo mode: this function enables the unit to reach the preset temperature in the shortest time
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Deal
Score
+57
71,620 Views
$779
Questions & Answers BETA
Balayya_Fan asked this question on 05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.

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#121
Quote from Deal Hound :
I like your tool list and other recommendations. Those tools will pay for themselves after one installation and continue saving you money on future work. Someone could add a small oxy-acetylene torch kit, a recovery machine, and a few other small things to that tool collection and have everything they need to tackle most any home HVAC job for another $1,000 or so. That goes to show you that you can kick your expensive HVAC contractor to the curb with about $2,000 in tools, some knowledge, and an EPA certification.

You torque flare nuts the same way I do. One tip people might find useful is to torque the nut with the crowfoot wrench at a right angle to the torque wrench handle so you don't have to worry about any corrections. Case 3 here [scuba-clinic-tools.com] illustrates what I mean.

I agree with you that a micron gauge isn't absolutely necessary for a single DIY job like this. One thing people can do, though, to help ensure a good evacuation without a micron gauge is to do a triple evacuation [achrnews.com]. Triple evacuations aren't done much anymore with the availability of inexpensive digital micron gauges that indicate with certainty when a deep vacuum has been achieved, but that's how evacuation used to be done in pre-micron gauge times.

About flaring tools, I can't say enough good things about these generic $20 eccentric flaring tools [ebay.com]. Maybe the cheap ones are somehow not as good as the $100 ones, but the one I have works brilliantly. It even has the clutch you mentioned. It's definitely more than adequate for occasional DIY work. Inexpensive flaring drill bits [ebay.com] have also become available and are capable of producing good flares, although they do require a fairly powerful drill (corded or at least 18V if battery operated) that can run at 1,800 RPM. Flaring drill bits also get the tubing very hot, so protecting your hands with suitable gloves is a must. Copper debris can also be an issue with flaring drill bits, so you have to make sure it doesn't fall down into the tubing.
I like all of your comments and that flaring tool looks like a showstopper for the price. I can't speak to it personally but it seems to be effectively the same thing I paid $120 for.
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#122
Quote from Deal Hound :
Thanks for the info! I'd certainly be willing to wait even 2 or 3 months to get something like a mini split system at 1/2 or 1/3 of the retail price.
We both like deals and if you want a real deal, you have to go where they are.

Besides being quick, DHL (and others) also does the paperwork for you that can be a little intimidating the first time or two. In quantity, a forwarder and inspector are good choices to employ.... someone on the other end that ok's you are getting what you paid for before loading.

Or, we could just take a trip... you could spend a week in just one wholesale mall and not see it all. About 1.5 Billion people are competing for your dollar that do not want to go back to the stone age of growing rice.

Personally, I like Vietnam a little better.... just now growing, super cheap to visit and shop. A haircut, facial, manicure, pedicure, ears, etc. and about a 90 minute massage with two girls is like $15 or less that is all above the board....
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#123
Quote from david3808 :
2 part installation video.
part 1: https://youtu.be/iFBmh29GezU
part 2: https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw

part 2 walks you through checking lines for leaks and vacuuming:
https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw?t=516



I only watched the part of part 2 where he did the evacuation but saw that he appeared to make an important mistake. He turned the vacuum pump off and disconnected it while the system was under vacuum. Doing it that way will allow air and moisture to be sucked into the system when the hose is removed from the Schrader valve port.

The usual way of avoiding that is to use a ball valve [amazon.com] attached to the service valve's Schrader valve port to close and isolate the system from the vacuum pump while the vacuum pump is still running. Then refrigerant can be released into the system, and the hose and ball valve can be disconnected with the system now under positive pressure.
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#124
Quote from ToolDeals :
We both like deals and if you want a real deal, you have to go where they are.

Besides being quick, DHL (and others) also does the paperwork for you that can be a little intimidating the first time or two. In quantity, a forwarder and inspector are good choices to employ.... someone on the other end that ok's you are getting what you paid for before loading.

Or, we could just take a trip... you could spend a week in just one wholesale mall and not see it all. About 1.5 Billion people are competing for your dollar that do not want to go back to the stone age of growing rice.

Personally, I like Vietnam a little better.... just now growing, super cheap to visit and shop. A haircut, facial, manicure, pedicure, ears, etc. and about a 90 minute massage with two girls is like $15 or less that is all above the board....
I definitely want to visit that part of the world one day. I've seen YouTube videos of the electronics and industrial markets in Shenzhen, and all I can say is that place is unbelievable. I'd be like a kid in the world's biggest candy store there.

If I ran an HVAC contracting company, I'd buy stuff from over there by the container and undercut the competition who still buy all their equipment from local distributors. I'm surprised how unusual it is for contractors to do that.
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#125
Quote from Deal Hound :
I definitely want to visit that part of the world one day. I've seen YouTube videos of the electronics and industrial markets in Shenzhen, and all I can say is that place is unbelievable. I'd be like a kid in the world's biggest candy store there.

If I ran an HVAC contracting company, I'd buy stuff from over there by the container and undercut the competition who still buy all their equipment from local distributors. I'm surprised how unusual it is for contractors to do that.
Or, just sell them like this OP deal...

Most contractors are good with the labor end, but not so much the procurement end.

If you are going, you might want to make it sooner than later with the increasing tension brewing over Taiwan, China Sea and currencies.
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#126
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#127
Quote from seasix :
Look at Lowe's site, the downloadable docs there are better...
https://www.lowes.com/pd/DuctlessAire-ENERGY-STAR-12000-BTU-500-sq-ft-Single-Ductless-Mini-Split-Air... [lowes.com]
Good find! I'm amazed how they managed to increase the size of the installation manual from 2 pages on Home Depot's site to 35 pages on Lowe's site with only a little extra information in the 35-page version. It is good to see they added information about leak checking and pulling a deep vacuum.
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#128
I didnt realize how hard these were to install. I guess my tomato's are getting a dual hose instead
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#129
Quote from capnswab :
4k?! Yikes. Got quoted about 10% of that in the Austin area. Crazy that it would be that different.
Who did you find in Austin that would do it for $400-500? And I'm assuming that doesn't include an electrician getting power to the location. Thanks!
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#130
Quote from ToolDeals :
Depends on how fast you want it.... DHL is pretty quick and reasonable. Since we don't normally purchase a container full, we rent space on a container, which takes about a month or so. Just request a quote FOB your address from a couple of places. We also use Alibaba and others. China is highly competitive within the country.

It is was easy, as in like buying from Amazon, everyone would be doing it.

But, you could fill up a 40' HQ and have it delivered from China to say, Chicago for about $3500 before dock fees and insurance. Are you ready to go into the ductless split system business? Smilie ... there is some fine tuning to do with logistics and shipping, such as paperwork, insurance, at the dock on time, etc. that you don't want to screw up and at some point, you are an importer with government regulations. tariffs, etc.

$3,500 for a container? When was the last time you looked at pricing? Containers from Asia to the midwest are over 10K right now. That is IF you can find a container. They are in very short supply as the entire global supply chain is FUBAR. Try just getting a slot on a train in the US to carry the container from a west coast port is at least a month behind schedule.
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#131
Thinking of building out the space above my garage - which is studs only @ the moment.
Can these handle an over the garage room?
What if the lower garage space was more or less unconditioned?
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#132
Quote from F1Racer :
Thinking of building out the space above my garage - which is studs only @ the moment.
Can these handle an over the garage room?
What if the lower garage space was more or less unconditioned?
Good floor insulation should suffice. As long as you are not letting the unconditioned heat/cold into the conditioned space, you should be good. Correct?
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#133
Quote from Deal Hound :
Magnuson-Moss doesn't hold manufacturers responsible for anyone else's mistakes. It simply says they can't make warranty coverage dependent on who supplied the parts or who does the work. They are still well within their rights to deny warranty coverage if aftermarket parts or a third party that performed the work caused the damage.

I am unaware of any provision in Magnuson-Moss that makes it only applicable to complete, fully functional units. I just skimmed the complete text of the act and didn't see any such provision. If such a provision does exist, it would mean Magnuson-Moss wouldn't apply to something like a computer motherboard, which isn't a complete computer and requires skilled installation. It is true that Magnuson-Moss only applies to consumer goods, so the warranty on something like an industrial hydraulic pump used on mining equipment would not have to comply. But I don't think there any argument that a home air conditioner is a consumer good that falls under Magnuson-Moss.

Manufacturers illegally and flagrantly defy Magnuson-Moss all the time. Those "warranty void if removed" stickers are illegal under Magnuson-Moss, but that hasn't stopped manufacturers from using them. The FTC has taken some action on those stickers recently [uspirg.org], but manufacturers have for decades and will continue to use them knowing that the odds are in their favor that the FTC won't do anything about it.
Last time I checked, installing a computer motherboard isn't regulated by the govt. HVAC on the otherhand is regulated. These companies have the right to require that their equipment be installed how they say according to govt and industry standards, and one way of insuring this is to require authorized installers. Even the FTC says this when they say manufacturers can't require you to "use specified parts or service providers to keep their warranties intact". "Specified service providers" doesn't mean that anyone and everyone is allowed to be a service provider; it just means the warranty can't require you to use a particular service provider out of all the eligible service providers.

I also don't think you understand how easy it is to destroy a unit ir the diagnostic criteria that goes into HVAC. More often than not, a tech won't even know the exact cause for defect in a part. And what do you think happens when the part is sent back to the manufacturer? Do you really think they're going to know if it was installed improperly? It's not easy or cheap to tear apart a compressor. They'll know why it doesn't work, but they'll probably won't be able to figure out what caused the malfunction.

Not sure why people keep bringing this stuff up. It's not like any of this warranty stuff is new. It was in place before, and hasn't changed since the Act was passed 45 yrs ago. Do people really think these companies have blatantly been violating the Act for almost a half a century with no one catching on? Come-on, think about.
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#134
Quote from Deal Hound :
I definitely want to visit that part of the world one day. I've seen YouTube videos of the electronics and industrial markets in Shenzhen, and all I can say is that place is unbelievable. I'd be like a kid in the world's biggest candy store there.

If I ran an HVAC contracting company, I'd buy stuff from over there by the container and undercut the competition who still buy all their equipment from local distributors. I'm surprised how unusual it is for contractors to do that.
Buying direct sounds great, but really isn't an option for a couple of reasons. 1. Most manufacturers require you that purchase from a distributor (won't sell direct). 2. No warranty if not procured through distributor. 3. Impossible to get replacement parts (especially for ductless, most are proprietary). 4. If you can get parts, manufacturers don't cover your labor under warranty. 5. All good HVAC companies warranty their work. If you install units that require multiple service calls, or if you can't get parts for them, you have to pay for it out of pocket. Service call = lost money. Broken part = lost more money. Can't get the part = you get to install a brand new unit for free, and you lost lots of money.

In the end it's not worth it. Could be worth it if you do stuff for yourself. I've installed units for complexes where they supplied everything (talking 100's of units), but they also had a FMO.
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#135
Quote from PlanetoftheMapes :
I bought a 2-head Senville 22 SER unit last month and came to the conclusion it makes sense to install it myself versus paying an installer. I too am in Los Angeles.

This works if you're handy since you'll probably do a better job. Doing things like a nitrogen pressure test, which aren't stated in the manual, is a good practice that many installers will skip unless it's explicitly stated in the manual like in some Mitsubishi units. This practice makes sense for heat pump R410A units which will see upwards of 450 psi on the head when in heat pump mode. But expect to spend $500-$700 on tools if you want to do it right.

Edit: if you want me to comment more on the tools I went with, let me know.
Edit Edit: As promised, I posted my tools breakdown reply on #99 of this thread, but I'm also going to post it below too. If this angers the mods then please remove post #99.



Everyone can decide what you need for your install versus others, but here's the tools that I bought for mine:


Nitrogen Tank w/ Regulator (got on Craigslist)1 $ 100.00
Appion CTEE14 MegaSeal Low-Loss Charging T-Fitting - 1/4'1 $ 49.94
Appion MGAVCR Mega Flow Vacuum Rated Valve Core Removal Tool – 5/16" System Connection1 $ 48.48

CPS VG200: Vacuum Micron Gauge with Digital LCD Display1 $ 146.21
Refrigeration Technologies RT201B Nylog Gasket/Thread Sealant1 $ 10.25
Yellow Jacket 42004 Series 41 Manifold with 3-1/8" Gauge, psi, R-22/404A/410A1 $ 112.29
Yellow Jacket 19173 R-410 5/16" to 1/4" coupler w/ schrader valve.1 $ 14.26
CPS Pro-Set R410A Flare Gauge1 $ 19.81
CPS BLACKMAX BFT850 Ultra-Lightweight R-410A Clutch-Type Ecentric Flaring Tool1 $ 130.03
Reed Tool DEBO Pencil Shape Deburring Tool for Copper1$11.68
RIDGID 32975 Model 103 Close Quarters Tubing Cutter, 1/8-inch to 5/8-inch Tube Cutter , Silver , Small1$12.67

Johnsen's 6915 Vacuum Pump Oil - 12 oz.1 $ 9.79
PITTSBURGH AUTOMOTIVE 3 CFM Two Stage Vacuum Pump1 $ 149.99
PITTSBURGH 3/8 In. Metric Crowfoot Wrench Set, 7 Pc.1 $ 9.99

For mine, it was a total of $825-ish, with it being more like $900 after tax. But I bought multiple things that most people don't need to buy, marked in italics, so you can save a lot of money skipping these. These optional tools represent an additional $372.61 ($400.55 after tax, at least where I live) you can eliminate about 50% from the tools budget.

First and foremost, don't attempt to work with electrical or HVAC unless you're pretty comfortable with DIY projects.

The Nitrogen tank is optional for pressure testing. Some say if you can pull a good vacuum and let it sit for a while that is "good enough" and most company's instructions exclude this from the installation instructions. But it's worth considering because when running R-410A in heat pump mode, you'll get high pressure across your head side of the loop. This makes sense because the high-pressure side = heat. So in my head it made sense you'd want to do a pressurization test and a vacuum down test, since one is pushing apart the fittings (pressure) and the other is sucking them together (vacuum). Since the fittings will all be exposed to both types of pressures it makes sense for me. Follow Dakine or Mitsubishi installation manual instructions for nitrogen pressure testing if you opt to do it. Note that most professional installers WILL SKIP THIS unless it's a unit that requires it (think Mitsubishi) and the installer is one of their "diamond" approved installers or whatever.

Secondly, I bought a flaring tool because I had a 2-head system and cut the tubing to fit the installation and make it more tidy. This is optional and I do not recommend it unless you know what you're doing. It also saves money to skip this. Before cutting, you need to make sure your run or runs have the required length to prevent overcharging the system. If you have a single head unit and end up cutting the tubes to 1/2 the length you may have too much refrigerant in the linesets. Refer to your manual or talk to the company before you decide to do this. And if you decide to do it anyways, yes it must be a HVAC specific flaring tool. Get one with the clutch system to prevent overtightening the flare press and make it foolproof. R-410A runs at too high of pressures to get away with subpar flares. Deciding to just accept the standard length of the copper tubing eliminates the costs associated with the Flaring tool, flaring gauge, deburring tool, and pipe cutting tool.

As for the rest, you do not NEED a digital micron gauge, many just use their normal gauge set's low pressure side gage and watch to see if the needle moves. This will also work. Again I wanted to go with professional duty equipment to get an install I'm 100% confident in. That way if the thing dies in a few years I won't have wonder in the back of my mind whether I screwed up the install. I know 100% my install was perfect. I went with the Yellow Jacket brand gauges, although you could in theory just get the low side gauge, hose, and valve if you're just pulling vacuum and save some money. I'm sure the garden variety chinesium brand gauges are probably perfectly fine for a solo install and will cut the cost in half for them.

The Appion Schrader core removal tool and the t-valve are totally optional too. You'd have to do some youtubing to see how they're used, but here's a great video which shows essentially the same setup I bought: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81EeY7SFYJc

But you can skip those tools and just use the Yellow Jacket 5/16" to 1/4" adapter and be just fine without them. Your pressure drawdown will just take a bit longer since you're going through the Schrader valve, and you'll loose a tiny bit of refrigerant before the schrader valve closes. Skipping these tools will save you $130-$140.

For the vacuum pump I went with a harbor freight 3CFM rated 2-stage vacuum pump. I believe it's rated for sub-30 microns of vacuum which is great, and a review on their site showed a guy pulling 13 microns if I recall correctly. To put this into perspective most manufacturers suggest pulling below 500 microns before charging the system. This is slightly overkill but it works for me.

Lastly I already have a torque wrench but you can get them dirt cheap from harbor freight, and I bought some crowfoot wrenches to use with my torque wrench to torque the bolts to the manufacturer's specifications. Will it really matter if you don't do it to spec? I don't know but I'm not finding out.

Then beyond all of this you'll have to run some 220-240v and have a disconnect box by your run. If you're not a confident DIY'er don't go for this, but if you are then just watch plenty of videos of installations, follow the instructions, and you'll be fine.
I'm glad you posted this. One, people know exactly what's involved, and if they decide to do it, they will be more successful. They will also discourage people who might take on more than they can handle and hire a professional / friend instead.
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