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Manual Fluid Extractor 6.5 Liters (Schwaben) $63.67

$63.67
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Schwaben 6.5 Liter Fluid Extractor for $63.67:
https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwa...885sch01a/

Schwaben - 024377SCH01A - Schwaben Brake Bleeding Adapter For Extractor (ecstuning.com) for $18.86:
https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwaben-parts/schwaben-brake-bleeding-adapter-for-extractor/024377sch01a/​ [ecstuning.com]

Here it is again. Like last time, not the lowest price but close within a few dollars. Best to perform traditional oil drain after using this 2-3 times as it probably gets 95% of the stuff out unless one is very good angling the tube.
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Created 10-24-2021 at 08:45 PM by WB_K
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#2
https://www.ecstuning.com/b-schwa...377sch01a/

Can't edit the post so here is the brake link.
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#3
Siphoning is the better method than draining (at least for European cars) Why? Because eventually the drain plug will strip and the whole oil pan needs to be replaced.

Added bonuses are you don't have to get under the car and it's cleaner.
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#4
Quote from z4m :
Siphoning is the better method than draining (at least for European cars) Why? Because eventually the drain plug will strip and the whole oil pan needs to be replaced.

Added bonuses are you don't have to get under the car and it's cleaner.
Interesting. I didn't know that about European cars. Couldn't we just use oil drain plug gaskets to delay, if not negate, that issue?
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#5
Quote from WB_K :
Interesting. I didn't know that about European cars. Couldn't we just use oil drain plug gaskets to delay, if not negate, that issue?
I mean, you can do it carefully, you can use little drain valves like those from Fumoto etc. There are options.

For newer EU cars that now have the oil filter accessible from the top of the engine, a fluid extractor works wonders.

For Japanese and other cars that still have the oil filter underneath, by the drain plug, you have to get under the car regardless...so unless your oil filter is on the top of the engine, I don't think you will get "full mileage" out of this tool (which otherwise is HIGHLY recommended).

I use a fluid extractor for my VW and I have a Fumoto Valve for my CX-5. Never stripped a plug personally, but between replacing gaskets or having 5qt of oil shooting out of a hole to deal with, both the above easily pay for themselves.

The Fumoto with an extension hose trains most of the oil directly to an empty jug for recycling and you are left with w/e is in the Oil filter to juggle over a pan. Germans with a fluid extractor you can almost do an oil change w/o needing to put on gloves or worry about even little drops of oil.
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#6
While we're on the subject, replace your stock drain plug with a magnetic one. You'll thank yourself later Smilie
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#7
I use one of these. I think if you're starting with a clean car and doing regular oil changes you're getting all the crap out. It really does suck everything off the bottom and you do use a filter after all. I'm thinking maybe once every 4-5 changes or so pull the plug just to be 100%.

The upside of this is that I've changed my oil in dress clothes in a few minutes.
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#8
Quote from z4m :
Siphoning is the better method than draining (at least for European cars) Why? Because eventually the drain plug will strip and the whole oil pan needs to be replaced.

Added bonuses are you don't have to get under the car and it's cleaner.
Eventually the drain plug will strip ? If your stripping (cross threading) drain plugs then your doing something wrong. Try placing the bolt on the threaded nut then turn it BACKWARDS (counter clockwise) till you feel the thread skip. That is when the beginning of the bolt thread and the beginning of the nut thread slide past each other. Now turn it CLOCKWISE and you should feel the threads properly engage. You should feel practically no resistance turning the bolt if aligned correctly. If you feel ANY resistance, stop and back up (counter clockwise). Get a larger bolt and nut like from anchor bolts from hardware store and practice on those till you understand the interaction between nut and bolt threads. There is no reason that nuts and bolts can be tightened and loosened thousands of times if done correctly. You could change the oil in your car every single day for 20 years straight and you still won't wear out the drain plug, provided you do it correctly. The only wear item on the drain plug that takes damage is the washer/seal and that is replaced usually every oil change.
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#9
Quote from z4m :
Siphoning is the better method than draining (at least for European cars) Why? Because eventually the drain plug will strip and the whole oil pan needs to be replaced.
Not true for most of us who change their own oil.
I've been changing my own oil on all my cars, the oldest being a 95 Jeep Wrangler which has had it's oil changed at least twice or more times a year for 26 years and I'm still on the original drain plug. I guess depending on the location and what kind of wrench you are using will determine how long your drain plug lasts. I'm thinking instead of buying this extractor for $64 if you invest that money in a good socket set, is a Slicker deal.Applause
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#10
The idea of leaving any debris at the bottom-most part of the pan unnerves me...no matter what anyone says. I have one of these, but can't get myself to use this method for oil changes instead of the traditional: Heating up the oil so it all flows out, wiping off the drain plug and getting every ounce of dirty oil out by letting it drain for 15 mins.

For some German cars such as the Porsche w/ the IMS issue or the BMW w/ rod bearings issues, I couldn't imagine taking that risk...just to save 10 mins and some messy steps. To each their own though...
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Last edited by NoelV7557 October 25, 2021 at 09:35 AM.
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#11
I've been changing fluids for almost 40 years and it's funny, I've never owned one of these before AND never felt the need to. Draining is always the best way to remove fluids from a vehicle ... gravity does the work and removes more grit and contaminants than this tool ever would. If I were to purchase (and use) this ... it would just sit there for a few years taking up space between changes.

A selling point of this tool is not having to get under the vehicle while servicing it. Why wouldn't you want to get under the vehicle, at least to conduct a visual inspection? I have found so many vehicle issues BECAUSE I had to get under the vehicle to change out the fluids.
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#12
Mity Vac
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#13
Quote from dud :
I've been changing fluids for almost 40 years and it's funny, I've never owned one of these before AND never felt the need to. Draining is always the best way to remove fluids from a vehicle ... gravity does the work and removes more grit and contaminants than this tool ever would. If I were to purchase (and use) this ... it would just sit there for a few years taking up space between changes.

A selling point of this tool is not having to get under the vehicle while servicing it. Why wouldn't you want to get under the vehicle, at least to conduct a visual inspection? I have found so many vehicle issues BECAUSE I had to get under the vehicle to change out the fluids.
The better use for these tools is for pressurized fluid changes like brake fluid. The BMW in particular is very sensitive to any air in the brake lines and w/out a ABS reset tool, tough to purge the air. Hoping this tool w/ the right adapters will execute better brake fluid changes.

Using this tool to extract/insert fluids is problematic, as you'd have to completely clean out all the tubes/tank before using this to insert clean fluid. Would be counterproductive to introduce new debris when inserting clean fluid.
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#14
To not leave ANY oil in my car I do a complete tear down and rebuild of the engine every 10k. Anything less is lazy Smilie
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#15
Quote from Hartage :
Eventually the drain plug will strip ? If your stripping (cross threading) drain plugs then your doing something wrong. Try placing the bolt on the threaded nut then turn it BACKWARDS (counter clockwise) till you feel the thread skip. That is when the beginning of the bolt thread and the beginning of the nut thread slide past each other. Now turn it CLOCKWISE and you should feel the threads properly engage. You should feel practically no resistance turning the bolt if aligned correctly. If you feel ANY resistance, stop and back up (counter clockwise). Get a larger bolt and nut like from anchor bolts from hardware store and practice on those till you understand the interaction between nut and bolt threads. There is no reason that nuts and bolts can be tightened and loosened thousands of times if done correctly. You could change the oil in your car every single day for 20 years straight and you still won't wear out the drain plug, provided you do it correctly. The only wear item on the drain plug that takes damage is the washer/seal and that is replaced usually every oil change.
Great write up, and I agree with the technique.

There are plenty of complaints, especially in German cars, of the drain plug stripping the oil plan and the replacement cost is over a grand in parts and labor.

For this reason, BMW and Audi dealerships are no longer draining oil as a standard practice, they're extracting it.

Ps: in my original post I should've mentioned strip the oil pan. I should've proofread it,in retrospect, before posting.
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