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DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner EXPIRED

$779
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Home Depot has DuctlessAire 12 Seer 12000 BTU 220V 1-Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner & Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter w/ WiFi (DA1221-H2) for $779. Shipping is free.

Thanks to community member david3808 for finding this deal.

Included:
  • Copper tubing w/ insulation and nuts
  • Control wire
  • 6' drain hose
  • Wall sleeve
  • Wall sleeve cover and tape
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Original Post

Written by
Edited May 22, 2021 at 05:15 PM by
Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars on Home Depot (931 reviews)
Pre-charged condenser for the DIYers

2 part installation video.
part 1: https://youtu.be/iFBmh29GezU
part 2: https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw

part 2 walks you through checking lines for leaks and vacuuming:
https://youtu.be/Uh9bcdpU8gw?t=516

Installation Manual - page 29 has the Air Evacuation instructions:
https://ductlessaire.com/wp-conte...lation.pdf

15% to 28% off
$697 - 21 SEER 9, 000 BTU 0.75 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump - 230-Volt/60 Hz OOS
$779 - 21 SEER 12,000 BTU 1 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$999 - 19 SEER 24000 BTU 2 Ton Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner with Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220-Volt
$1019 - 21 SEER 18,000 BTU 1.5 Ton Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz
$1199 - 21 SEER 24,000 BTU Wi-Fi Ductless Mini Split Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Variable Speed Inverter - 220V/60Hz

https://www.homedepot.com/Special...uyOfTheDay
  • 21.5 SEER rating ENERGY STAR certified: estimated national average annual operating cooling cost is 70 USD based on AHRI certificate #9150138
  • Package includes: stylishly designed interior white wall-mount air handler with LED display; exterior pre-charged condenser with special golden anti-corrosive coating coils; wireless remote control for customizable airflow and temperature adjustment; 25 ft. complete kit
  • 25 ft. kit includes: copper tubing with insulation and nuts, control wire, 6 ft. drain hose, wall sleeve, wall sleeve cover and tape
  • Electroplated coils: the electroplated hydrophilic coils improve heating efficiency by accelerating the defrosting process; the unique anti-corrosive coating on the coils also aids in withstanding the effects of salty air, rain and other corrosive elements by allowing contaminated water on the coils to run off more quickly, reducing the corrosive effect to the coils; heat exchange performance is much longer lasting
  • Low ambient operation: a special built-in low ambient kit can be used in temperatures as low as 5°F for cooling operation, useful for users who need to maintain cooling during winter
  • Refrigerant leak detection: with this new technology, the system will alarm when a refrigerant leak is detected
  • Dual sensor fixed or remote: by switching to remote sensor and keeping the remote close to you, you tell the air conditioner to set the temperature from wherever the remote happens to be, this counteracts the tendency for the air conditioner to stop cooling or heating because the air around the unit has reached its set temperature (switches off after period of inactivity to preserve battery life)
  • HEPA filter included (1): a HEPA filter is a type of mechanical air filter; it works by forcing air through a fine mesh that traps harmful particles such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites and tobacco smoke
  • 2-direction air vane technology: in cooling mode the air vane opens counterclockwise to direct air horizontally, allowing for an even cooling effect; in heating mode the air vane opens clockwise, directing air downward, this time for a uniform heating effect
  • Built-in electronic diagnostic: monitoring some abnormal operations or parts failures, microcomputer of the air conditioner will switch off and protect the system automatically; meanwhile, the error or protection code will be displayed on the indoor unit
  • Outdoor pan heater: a heating belt is fitted on the base plate of the outdoor unit to avoid accumulation of rain, snow or water on the base plate
  • Dual washable filters: a good air conditioner should not only take care of the temperature in your home but also the quality of the air you breathe; the system aids in removing most of the pollen dust, smoke and other microscopic airborne particles that by latest thinking contribute to respiratory problems like asthma and hay fever
  • Self-cleaning: by pressing clean on the remote control, it automatically cleans the evaporator to aid in reducing buildup of bacteria and keeps the air fresh
  • Sleep mode: in sleep mode, the unit automatically decreases the heating or increases the cooling by 1° per hour for the first 2 hours of use, then holds the temperature steady for 5 hours before ceasing
  • Low noise airflow system: without decreasing the airflow volume and capacity output, the large-diameter cross flow fan can bring down the indoor unit noise level by lowering the fan speed
  • Anti-cold draft: if the unit is turned on in heat mode when the ambient temperature is low, it will warm up prior to fan operation to prevent cold air in heating mode
  • Louver position memory: the set louver position is stored in memory by the microcomputer and the louver returns to the stored position when the next operation is performed
  • Turbo mode: this function enables the unit to reach the preset temperature in the shortest time
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Deal
Score
+57
71,600 Views
$779
Questions & Answers BETA
Balayya_Fan asked this question on 05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
05-24-2021 at 10:17 AM
I'm not aware of any. I have two (different brand) installed in my basement. Just need to ensure there's a way to route power and refrigerant between indoor and outdoor units. And of course you need to be able to run a condensate line from the indoor unit to a drain.

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This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jul 2008
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#136
Quote from dvpatel :
Good floor insulation should suffice. As long as you are not letting the unconditioned heat/cold into the conditioned space, you should be good. Correct?
That's what I was thinking. Just need to have floor of space above ie ceiling of space below insulated & abutting joints foamed.

Thanks for confirmed.
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#137
Quote from MichaelR7517 :
Thanks, that helps a lot! You are my hero right now! Now to call them tomorrow and see if they install in Hawthorne near LAX..Im doing this for my family...
I live in Torrance so you should be good to go.
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#138
Quote from Deal Hound :
The unit she installed in the video has a pre-charged line set (and condenser). This DuctlessAire unit only has a pre-charged condenser, which means evacuating the rest of the system with a vacuum pump is necessary.
Ah that is very awkward EEK!
It is like wipe your ass half way after poop and pull up the pants LMAO
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#139
Quote from flunder :
Taking a quick stab:

Pros-
No duct work is obvious.
On demand which can save heating/cooling bill.
More precise temperature control "zones".

Cons-
The zones play as double edge sword, when moving in or out the heated/air conditioned space takes some getting used to.
The indoor unit hangs on the wall compare to just a register, so the wall is more or less occupied.
Have to run additional electricity to both in door and outdoor units and the tubes from the indoor unit to the outdoor unit.
More filters to clean.
I think you only run electricity to the outdoor unit. Nothing needed to indoor unit except the lines coming from the outdoor unit going to the indoor unit. This carries power as well.
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#140
Quote from luddite_cyborg :
I need to do some research, maybe someone with the know-how can weigh in:
Comparing the 9000 to 12000 BTU models, the 12000 is quieter and has a variable speed inverter for the heat pump (for $80 more).
I'd prefer the 12000 model but it's oversized for my basement room (~300 sq ft). How bad of an idea is it to install the oversized 12000 BTU model? Can I expect freezing coils, etc. like with a standard window AC?
Shouldn't be a problem. It will just cool things down quicker and run shorter times. But since it has variable speed inverter(?) it probably doesn't even matter. I would do it.
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#141
Quote from Bboy486 :
Is the 18,000 something that can work to cool a garage? Two car and I am aware of air escaping from the door and lack of insulation. But I am in AZ and want to put a gym in my garage.
How big is the garage? If you're in the phoenix area, it will have to work pretty hard. Also, is the garage door facing south? All things to consider.
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#142
Quote from Saving4Broke :
Hold up, lots of misinformation here. You're going to be installing the Mr. Cool exactly the same way as every other unit out there. The difference is the refrigerant is in the condenser unit ready to go in the conventional units (like this one) vs the Mr cool units having it in the lineset. Know that you also cannot cut to length with the Mr. Cool either making some people getting creative with the excess line length that causes problems a lot of times because if you're going to coil it up, it needs to sit horizontal. At the end, if you install them yourself, the conventional unit will run you about $250 or so for a professional to purge the lines with nitrogen, vacuum it down below the magical 500 micron level, check for leaks, then release the refrigerant.
I don't recall seeing the coils needing to sit horizontal in the mrcool documentation. Are you sure?
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#143
Quote from Saving4Broke :
Hold up, lots of misinformation here. You're going to be installing the Mr. Cool exactly the same way as every other unit out there. The difference is the refrigerant is in the condenser unit ready to go in the conventional units (like this one) vs the Mr cool units having it in the lineset. Know that you also cannot cut to length with the Mr. Cool either making some people getting creative with the excess line length that causes problems a lot of times because if you're going to coil it up, it needs to sit horizontal. At the end, if you install them yourself, the conventional unit will run you about $250 or so for a professional to purge the lines with nitrogen, vacuum it down below the magical 500 micron level, check for leaks, then release the refrigerant.
Yeah. Lots of misinformation including your's.

The Mr. Cool units do not have anything in the linesets either. The only difference is the Mr. Cool linesets are vacuumed and sealed and have valves which open up when you connect them. So, you do not need to vacuum the Mr. Cool units. The rest of the lot has open lines and once you connect them, you still have to vacuum the lines regardless of if you cut them or not.

The reason Mr. Cool lines can't be cut is because of the special valves at each end which keep the lines sealed during shipment.
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#144
Quote from dvpatel :
Yeah. Lots of misinformation including your's.

The Mr. Cool units do not have anything in the linesets either. The only difference is the Mr. Cool linesets are vacuumed and sealed and have valves which open up when you connect them. So, you do not need to vacuum the Mr. Cool units. The rest of the lot has open lines and once you connect them, you still have to vacuum the lines regardless of if you cut them or not.

The reason Mr. Cool lines can't be cut is because of the special valves at each end which keep the lines sealed during shipment.
This is correct, the condensers still hold the charge in the MRCOOL DIY units as far as I'm aware and the line sets are what are vacuumed just like you said.
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#145
Quote from geekwithoutacause :
How big is the garage? If you're in the phoenix area, it will have to work pretty hard. Also, is the garage door facing south? All things to consider.
Facing north. 2-car. I'm going to try it and see if it helps at all
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#146
Quote from Bboy486 :
That is more than fine. I can automate it
For these units it's usually more efficient to just set a temp. But az weather can be really cold at night too. Just get a roll of reflextix and line your garage door
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#147
Quote from geekwithoutacause :
Shouldn't be a problem. It will just cool things down quicker and run shorter times. But since it has variable speed inverter(?) it probably doesn't even matter. I would do it.
Without knowing what their load calculations are, going with the 12k unit might be a very bad idea. For the most part, inverter compressors are designed to run 24/7. They also have a minimum output (I didn't see it listed for this unit). Now over sizing has nothing to do with coils freezing over,, but what will happen is short cycling, which causes excessive wear and a room that's cold and clammy because the moisture is being pulled out.
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#148
Quote from BENJAMINB1246 :
Without knowing what their load calculations are, going with the 12k unit might be a very bad idea. For the most part, inverter compressors are designed to run 24/7. They also have a minimum output (I didn't see it listed for this unit). Now over sizing has nothing to do with coils freezing over,, but what will happen is short cycling, which causes excessive wear and a room that's cold and clammy because the moisture is being pulled out.
Nice try but wrong.
These ac compressors are not meant to run 24/7 ever. IF you do , the unit is WAY too small.
Also, since it's a basement it probably won't gain a lot of heat and the ac will run very infrequently.
Cold and clammy completely depends on the climate. Cold and clammy is because the ac doesn't get time to remove the moisture but does have time to cool it down (too quickly). So the moisture actually stays in the room. Going from 8K to 12K isn't going to cause that.
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#149
Quote from geekwithoutacause :
Nice try but wrong.
These ac compressors are not meant to run 24/7 ever. IF you do , the unit is WAY too small.
Also, since it's a basement it probably won't gain a lot of heat and the ac will run very infrequently.
Cold and clammy completely depends on the climate. Cold and clammy is because the ac doesn't get time to remove the moisture but does have time to cool it down (too quickly). So the moisture actually stays in the room. Going from 8K to 12K isn't going to cause that.
Maybe you should do some research before commenting. I've been in HVAC for almost 20 yrs, have installed 100's of mini splits, and have serviced countless numbers of them. So I think I might know what I'm talking about.

1st, 12k is massive for 300 sq ft (obviously I don't know his load or what he has in there, but a quick manual j for my area puts it at about 2,000 btu's.)

2nd, almost all basements already have a high RH and when you start cooling it it gets worse unless the unit runs long enough to remove it. Short cycling will make it worse.

3rd, this is an INVERTER COMPRESSOR. You might want to read up on them. They ARE designed to run all the time. I couldn't find the exact specs for this unit, so I don't know what the minimum flow is. They also don't specify if they use some type of fuzzy control or a basic delta T. So it is possible that their lowest flow is still fairly high. But nevertheless it's designed to keep running.
https://www.anracelectrical.com.a...verter-ac/
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#150
Quote from PlanetoftheMapes :
This is correct, the condensers still hold the charge in the MRCOOL DIY units as far as I'm aware and the line sets are what are vacuumed just like you said.
I don't know why everybody is thinking this. The charge in the condenser is only the amount needed for the condenser itself. The MrCool DIY linesets are precharged with refrigerant down to the exact ounce for the length of that particular lineset. If they weren't you would have to figure out how many ounces of refrigerant are in each foot and add it to the unit.
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