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CyberPower 1350VA Simulated Sine Wave UPS Battery Backup System EXPIRED

$90
$119.00
+ $5 S&H
+71 Deal Score
32,866 Views
Costco Wholesale has CyberPower 1350VA Simulated Sine Wave UPS Battery Backup System for $89.99. Shipping is $4.99.

Note, must be logged into your Costco Wholesale account to view price.

Thanks to Community Member James2012 for finding this deal.

Editor's Notes & Price Research

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  • About this deal:
    • Offer valid through November 28, 2021 or while supplies last
    • Limit 5 per member
  • About this product:
    • 10 NEMA 5-15R Outlets
    • 1x USB Type-A, 1x USB Type-C Charge Ports (4.0A Shared)
    • Automatic Voltage Regulation
    • Multifunction LCD Panel
    • Surge Protection/1500 Joules
  • About this store:
    • Costco Wholesale return policy may be found here
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Written by
Edited November 26, 2021 at 08:54 PM by
Hi everyone... Costco has a $10 discount on the CyberPower 1350VA/810Watts Simulated Sine Wave UPS Battery Backup with Surge Protection. It's $89.99 in-store and on-line (+$4.99 shipping). I bought mine in-store. On sale until 11/28/21.

Features:
10 NEMA 5-15R Outlets
1x USB Type-A, 1x USB Type-C Charge Ports (4.0A Shared)
Automatic Voltage Regulation
Multifunction LCD Panel
Surge Protection/1500 Joules

A mini-tower UPS with line interactive topology, the CyberPower Intelligent LCD CST135UC provides battery backup (using simulated sine wave output) and surge protection for desktop computers, workstations, networking devices, and home entertainment systems. The CST135UC uses Automatic Voltage Regulation (AVR) to correct minor power fluctuations without switching to battery power, which extends battery life. AVR is essential in areas where power fluctuations occur frequently.

Two USB charge ports (2.1 Amp shared) rapidly power portable devices such as mobile phones, MP3 players, and cameras.

Product Details:
Capacity: 1350 VA / 810 W
Topology: Line Interactive
Waveform: Simulated Sine Wave
Output: 120 VAC ± 5%
Runtime (half/full): 10 minutes / 2 minutes
Plug type & cord: NEMA 5-15P, 6 ft. cord
Outlets: 10 (5 surge, 5 surge + battery backup)
Outlet types: 10 NEMA 5-15R
USB charge ports: 5V/4.0A (20W)
: 1 x Type-A & 1 x Type-C @ 4.0A (Shared)
Communication: USB
Data line protection: Telephone, Network, Coaxial
Management software: PowerPanel® Personal Edition
ENERGY STAR® qualified: Yes
User-replaceable batteries: 2

What's In The Box:
UPS System
User manual
USB A+B type cable


https://www.costco.com/cyberpower...gsNFO7vHUT
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$90
$119.00
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Questions & Answers BETA
jtree1 asked this question on 11-30-2021 at 11:55 AM
11-30-2021 at 11:55 AM
Some picky devices won't recognize a digital sine wave as actual AC and shut down. It's pretty rare though.
11-30-2021 at 11:55 AM
The need for true sine wave is vanishing small - mostly a up sell marketing tool.
prajapak asked this question on 11-30-2021 at 11:39 AM
11-30-2021 at 11:39 AM
Just got one in store. Manual says no sump pump
Antyman asked this question on 11-30-2021 at 11:39 AM
11-30-2021 at 11:39 AM
Yes it does. On the rear panel there is a USB port designed for this. All you need to do, is connect it, and set the options up on the NAS. Works great on a Synology NAS.

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Nice find, guess I'll go to costco and refund the difference via manager. (Purchased within a month)

Sine wave wise, as far as i know with my research for a week, PC power supplies now days can handle either Pure and Simulated without any problems.
The claims about PC PSU need Pure are majorly talking about PSU 10yrs ago without standard like modern gold plat certificate. They only situation you need Pure is the electronics with sensitive wave requirements, which are medical equipment and laser printers etc, search what electronics need pure sine wave if you needed.

Also the premium Pure battery replacement after 3 year will cost a bit more than Simulated.

I am NOT against people purchasing the higher quality Pure, I'm just here to state that simulated UPS is better bang for the buck in terms of using it as PC UPS.
Not necessarily better, but clearly different. However, since simulated sine wave occupies the entire bottom end of the market (from small power strip style units to ones like this CyberPower), there is a correlation that some buyers might make between more premium UPSes and the availability of pure sine wave. Will you find pure sine wave in a cheapo UPS? Basically never. Is a pure sine wave necessarily better than an otherwise equivalent simulated sine wave UPS? No, but typically pure sine wave models exist in a price and quality tier just above "average".


Compatibility issues with simulated sine wave are indeed far from a widespread issue, though a careful test might be recommended after giving the UPS a day or two to charge up. There are some risks to this test, but if you get 5-10 minutes of solid run-time you might expect the same in future real-world scenarios. I'll put a separate comment about my own recommendations regarding this issue.

One warning I'd add for an OLED TV is to check the peak power draw rating. I've seen OLED TVs rated for over 600W. This UPS is rated for a peak draw of 810W, and while an OLED would rarely reach peak draw often or for very long (unless you just stare at full brightness white screens all day?) you do want to ensure you have a decent overhead between your TV's potential peak draw and your UPS' peak load capacity. This is in part because you might need more than a couple of minutes to actually shut things down gracefully in the case of a power outage (and near peak load retail UPS times are indeed measured in minutes).

The specifications sheets for the two models suggest that the CP1350AVRLCD has denser batteries (9Ah vs 7Ah), giving it twice the runtime at peak load (and 50% more run time at half load). Of course, you could make this change yourself the next time you rotate those batteries out!

https://www.cyberpowersystems.com.../cst135uc/

https://www.cyberpowersystems.com...350avrlcd/

Good luck!
Jon
I do IT support for a number of fast food locations and we use almost exclusively CyberPower UPSs. Each location might have 8+ and they do what they're supposed to.

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#3
How much better is a Real Sine Wave UPS vs this Simulated Sine Wave UPS?
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#4
This looks like a slick deal to me (personally.) Been looking for a higher watt UPS that will cover my security system in case of power outage and the other black Friday deals were sub-400 watt. Plus with Costco's return policy I know that returns will be trouble free if I have any issues. (Cyberpower is a decent brand from what I can tell, so crossing my fingers and pulling the trigger.)
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#5
Quote from jtree1 :
How much better is a Real Sine Wave UPS vs this Simulated Sine Wave UPS?
Some picky devices won't recognize a digital sine wave as actual AC and shut down. It's pretty rare though.
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Last edited by BlackHappy November 26, 2021 at 08:46 PM.
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#6
I do IT support for a number of fast food locations and we use almost exclusively CyberPower UPSs. Each location might have 8+ and they do what they're supposed to.
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11-26-2021 at 08:53 PM
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#8
Quote from Eremeya :
I do IT support for a number of fast food locations and we use almost exclusively CyberPower UPSs. Each location might have 8+ and they do what they're supposed to.
How many years are you getting out of them?
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#9
Nice find, guess I'll go to costco and refund the difference via manager. (Purchased within a month)

Sine wave wise, as far as i know with my research for a week, PC power supplies now days can handle either Pure and Simulated without any problems.
The claims about PC PSU need Pure are majorly talking about PSU 10yrs ago without standard like modern gold plat certificate. They only situation you need Pure is the electronics with sensitive wave requirements, which are medical equipment and laser printers etc, search what electronics need pure sine wave if you needed.

Also the premium Pure battery replacement after 3 year will cost a bit more than Simulated.

I am NOT against people purchasing the higher quality Pure, I'm just here to state that simulated UPS is better bang for the buck in terms of using it as PC UPS.
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#10
Glad to see this simulated sine wave unit at Costco has been updated with the newer style USB-C + USB-A front panel design.

I have a number of similar APCs, so still holding out for the updated Cyberpower pure sine wave 1350 or 1500 to make it to Costco. Perhaps in 2022...
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#11
Quote from MagentaKitten833 :
Nice find, guess I'll go to costco and refund the difference via manager. (Purchased within a month)

Sine wave wise, as far as i know with my research for a week, PC power supplies now days can handle either Pure and Simulated without any problems.
The claims about PC PSU need Pure are majorly talking about PSU 10yrs ago without standard like modern gold plat certificate. They only situation you need Pure is the electronics with sensitive wave requirements, which are medical equipment and laser printers etc, search what electronics need pure sine wave if you needed.

Also the premium Pure battery replacement after 3 year will cost a bit more than Simulated.

I am NOT against people purchasing the higher quality Pure, I'm just here to state that simulated UPS is better bang for the buck in terms of using it as PC UPS.
It makes little difference normally. I have this or a very similar (1800VA, I think) unit in my office. One of the many things it powers is a night light, and that gets a hotspot when it's powered by this. It's the only device I know of that has any issue (and I have two wireless routers, and a bunch of other devices that this powers).
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#12
Quote from soulmist :
This looks like a slick deal to me (personally.) Been looking for a higher watt UPS that will cover my security system in case of power outage and the other black Friday deals were sub-400 watt. Plus with Costco's return policy I know that returns will be trouble free if I have any issues. (Cyberpower is a decent brand from what I can tell, so crossing my fingers and pulling the trigger.)
CyberPower is one of the better UPS manufacturers IMO, they've proven themselves over past decade. I've had a few now, mostly models just like this (full-size with display, simulated sine wave), none have failed yet after surely countless surges and brownouts. The usage displays are awesome. Batteries easy to replace (standard size 12V 7-9AH). Software is good enough, if needed (PC). I'd buy this if I needed one, highly recommended for PC (including router) or home theater.
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#13
Quote from MagentaKitten833 :
Nice find, guess I'll go to costco and refund the difference via manager. (Purchased within a month)

Sine wave wise, as far as i know with my research for a week, PC power supplies now days can handle either Pure and Simulated without any problems.
The claims about PC PSU need Pure are majorly talking about PSU 10yrs ago without standard like modern gold plat certificate. They only situation you need Pure is the electronics with sensitive wave requirements, which are medical equipment and laser printers etc, search what electronics need pure sine wave if you needed.

Also the premium Pure battery replacement after 3 year will cost a bit more than Simulated.

I am NOT against people purchasing the higher quality Pure, I'm just here to state that simulated UPS is better bang for the buck in terms of using it as PC UPS.
What about fancy oled TV?
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#14
Are these good to power wave makers for aquarium?
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#15
Quote from bk_InAZ :
It makes little difference normally. I have this or a very similar (1800VA, I think) unit in my office. One of the many things it powers is a night light, and that gets a hotspot when it's powered by this. It's the only device I know of that has any issue (and I have two wireless routers, and a bunch of other devices that this powers).
can you pls elaborate what you mean by "that gets a hotspot"? Not working, not stay on, or what?
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