Forum Thread

Johnson Level & Tool CS10 Professional Easy-Read Steel Carpenter Square, 8" x 12", Silver, 1 Square - Carpentry Squares - Amazon.com $5.13

$5.13
+3 Deal Score
1,939 Views
FRAMING SQUARE: The forged tip of this construction tool allows for optimum contact and a firm grip, eliminating stripping. It's great for measuring inside or outside the square, as well as checking table saw adjustments.
CONSTRUCTION: This lightweight steel square is made of high-quality steel, ensuring optimum durability. As a result, it can survive even the most severe worksite damage. This tool is finished with a low-glare, anti-rust powder coating.
GRADUATIONS: This measuring gauge has easy-to-read 1/8" graduations and numbers that are EZ Read thermal bonded. It's ideal for laying out and identifying patterns in roofing, framing, stairway work, etc.
APPLICATIONS: This easy-to-carry building instrument is perfect for use in establishing right angles, and marking cutoff work on wide stock. It is a useful tool for designing layouts and patterns.
PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS: This ergonomically designed carpentry equipment measures 8" x 12" and weighs 10.2 ounces (0.39 kg). It has a 12" x 1-1/2" body, 8" x 1" tongue, 1/8" thick.
12" body x 8" tongue, 1/8" thick
EZ Read permanent thermal bonded numbers and 1/16", 1/8" graduations
Rugged steel construction with low glare, anti-rust powder coating

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00C7CG...J7YNEQKX_0
Share
Good deal?
You gave thanks to iuku for this post.
Thank you!
iuku posted this deal. Say thanks!
Add Comment
Created 06-25-2022 at 08:33 AM by iuku
If you purchase something through a post on our site, Slickdeals may get a small share of the sale.
Deal
Score
+3
1,939 Views
$5.13
About the OP
Send Message
Pro
Joined Feb 2014 L7: Teacher
1,682 Reputation Points
4 Deals Posted
380 Votes Submitted
2,827 Comments Posted
Don't have Amazon Prime? Students can get a free 6-Month Amazon Prime trial with free 2-day shipping, unlimited video streaming & more. If you're not a student, there's also a free 1-Month Amazon Prime trial available.
Questions & Answers BETA
Ask our community of deal experts a question about this deal, product, or store.

5 Comments

1
Post to Q&A to get a quicker answer to your question!

Sign up for a Slickdeals account to remove this ad.

This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2014
L10: Grand Master
6,796 Posts
Pro
#2
.
More or less a normal price for an 8" x 12" at box stores... Harbor Freight [harborfreight.com] is $4 before any coupon. Me, I would rather buy in person to double check it is actually square, but do same with levels.

Today, many prefer the 12" speed square with plastic being popular because it is light, does not rust or corrode and like all, has the lip on edge for quick usage... and cheap. Besides, the orange ones are easy to find. But sure, the red and blue metal speed squares are pretty. Smilie

==============
Now, an 18" x 24" framing square is a different usage tool. Having installed a zillion doors over the years, the framing square with a level is what I use. All solid doors come square, so if the frame is square, the door will fit the hinge side and top. The only thing left is to adjust in or out to the plumb of the wall and door to close flush. For narrow style commercial aluminum doors, the door is adjustable on the latch side up or down by blocking or reverse blocking and useful when the opening is not square, but the framing square gets you started.
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
1
Nothelpful Reaction
2
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2011
L4: Apprentice
429 Posts
141 Reputation
#3
Quote from ToolDeals :
.
More or less a normal price for an 8" x 12" at box stores... Harbor Freight [harborfreight.com] is $4 before any coupon. Me, I would rather buy in person to double check it is actually square, but do same with levels.

Today, many prefer the 12" speed square with plastic being popular because it is light, does not rust or corrode and like all, has the lip on edge for quick usage... and cheap. Besides, the orange ones are easy to find. But sure, the red and blue metal speed squares are pretty. Smilie

==============
Now, an 18" x 24" framing square is a different usage tool. Having installed a zillion doors over the years, the framing square with a level is what I use. All solid doors come square, so if the frame is square, the door will fit the hinge side and top. The only thing left is to adjust in or out to the plumb of the wall and door to close flush. For narrow style commercial aluminum doors, the door is adjustable on the latch side up or down by blocking or reverse blocking and useful when the opening is not square, but the framing square gets you started.
very helpful. thank you!
how do you check for squareness at the store?
Like Reaction
1
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2012
Who me?
13,812 Posts
4,557 Reputation
Pro
Expert
#4
Quote from 8ajula :
very helpful. thank you!
how do you check for squareness at the store?
I take two and put them side by side on a straight edge (a level is usually close by, or use the edge of a stout straight shelf) and look for gaps at the base or the top of the vertical parts. If no gaps, then put one on top of the other, if they match then they are both 90°.

The traditional way at home is to use one to draw line, flip it over and draw another line. If the lines match or are parallel, then you're good. If they diverge, then you need a new square (or google how to tune it with a punch).
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined Jun 2014
L10: Grand Master
6,796 Posts
Pro
#5
Quote from 8ajula :
very helpful. thank you!
how do you check for squareness at the store?
.
You walk over to a piece of plywood, shelf or whatever that has a straight front edge and with the base of the square tight if it has a lip, or flush if not, against that edge of the plywood and the perpendicular side of the square to the right, mark the bottom and top with a pencil. Just a small pencil mark at the point closest and furthest from you. Then you move the square to the right and flip over so the perpendicular side is to the left and tight against the front edge, slide it to the marks you made before to see if they line up. As long as your front base line is straight and you keep the bottom of the square flush against it, that is how you quickly check any square without any measurements, parallel lines, etc.

It is not uncommon for mass produced squares to be out a fraction, but you can find one that is perfect. It is really important when doing repetition on same piece like stair stringers.

PS: You could start perpendicular left and then do right, but hopefully you understand what I am saying. If not, let me know and I will PM you a picture or something. There is probably a video on youtube, but they sometimes complicate it for no valid reason and it gets regurgitated.
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
This comment has been rated as unhelpful by Slickdeals users
Joined May 2011
L4: Apprentice
429 Posts
141 Reputation
#6
Quote from jeff34270 :
I take two and put them side by side on a straight edge (a level is usually close by, or use the edge of a stout straight shelf) and look for gaps at the base or the top of the vertical parts. If no gaps, then put one on top of the other, if they match then they are both 90°.

The traditional way at home is to use one to draw line, flip it over and draw another line. If the lines match or are parallel, then you're good. If they diverge, then you need a new square (or google how to tune it with a punch).
Quote from ToolDeals :
.
You walk over to a piece of plywood, shelf or whatever that has a straight front edge and with the base of the square tight if it has a lip, or flush if not, against that edge of the plywood and the perpendicular side of the square to the right, mark the bottom and top with a pencil. Just a small pencil mark at the point closest and furthest from you. Then you move the square to the right and flip over so the perpendicular side is to the left and tight against the front edge, slide it to the marks you made before to see if they line up. As long as your front base line is straight and you keep the bottom of the square flush against it, that is how you quickly check any square without any measurements, parallel lines, etc.

It is not uncommon for mass produced squares to be out a fraction, but you can find one that is perfect. It is really important when doing repetition on same piece like stair stringers.

PS: You could start perpendicular left and then do right, but hopefully you understand what I am saying. If not, let me know and I will PM you a picture or something. There is probably a video on youtube, but they sometimes complicate it for no valid reason and it gets regurgitated.
thanks!
Like Reaction
0
Funny Reaction
0
Helpful Reaction
0
Nothelpful Reaction
0
Reply
Page 1 of 1
1
Join the Conversation
Add a Comment
 

Trending Stores

Coupons for Popular Stores

More Home & Home Improvement Deals & Discounts

Link Copied to Clipboard

Slickdeals is community-supported. We may get paid by brands or deals, including promoted items.