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Kidde Plug-In Carbon Monoxide Detector w/ Battery Backup EXPIRED

$11.85
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Amazon has Kidde Plug-In Carbon Monoxide Detector w/ Battery Backup (KN-COP-DP2) on sale for $13.04 -> now $11.84. Shipping is free with Prime or on $25+ orders.

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About this product:
  • CO (carbon monoxide) detector that alerts with a warning signal against dangerous levels of carbon monoxide in your home.
  • 85dB (decibel) alarm alerts of fire
  • Easy & quick installation: plugs directly into your home's standard wall outlet.
  • Protects during a power failure: two AA batteries (included) provide backup service in the event of a power outage.
  • 120-Volt
  • UL Certified
  • 10-Year Limited Warranty
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Edited November 30, 2021 at 01:09 PM by
Kidde Carbon Monoxide Detector, Plug In with Battery Backup, CO Detector, KN-COP-DP2 $13.04 FS w/ Amazon Prime (or $35 purchase), AC powered w/battery backup

CO detector that alerts with a warning signal against dangerous levels of carbon monoxide in your home
Easy & quick installation - plugs directly into your home's standard wall outlet, 85 decibel alarm alerts of fire
Protects during a power failure - 2-AA batteries, included with pack, provide backup service in the event of a power outage
Whole home family protection - place 1 carbon monoxide detector on each level of your home & in your bedroom to protect from poisonous gases
UL Certified, 10-year limited warranty

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product...UTF8&psc=1 >Now $11.84

Please test your carbon monoxide detectors prior to using your gas furnace.
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$11.85
$29.99
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Last Edited by vsspam December 6, 2021 at 10:01 AM
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Not sure why the post only mentions Amazon.
Same price in-store at Walmart.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kidde-...2/39360952

11/29 Amazon has dropped price to $11.84 (looks like to match Walmart.com price).

Link to carbon monoxide detector with digital display for $18.98 (I have one in my MBR and use the basic one for my other BRs): DEAD - NOW $29.90

Kidde Nighthawk Carbon Monoxide Detector, AC-Plug-In with Battery Backup, Digital Display

https://www.amazon.com/Nighthawk-...00002N86A/

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kidde-...arm/870340

Link to combined carbon monoxide and gas detector for $29.99 (I have this one next to my gas dryer): DEAD - Now $34.50

Kidde Nighthawk Carbon Monoxide Detector & Propane, Natural, & Explosive Gas Detector, AC-Plug-In with Battery Backup, Digital Display
https://www.amazon.com/Nighthawk-...0002EVNJ6/


Amazon has raised prices, but walmart.com still has for $11.84.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Kidde-...hbdg=L1700


12/6 After raising price, Amazon has dropped price again to $11.84 to match Walmart.com.
Questions & Answers BETA
ryuounce asked this question on 12-01-2021 at 02:21 PM
12-01-2021 at 02:21 PM
No, nor do I think one even exists at the consumer level (maybe for specialty applications in labs or whatnot). There is CO2 all around us all the time; it's what trees breathe. In fact, the usual air we breathe is only about 21% oxygen. The only time CO2 poisoning would ever be a concern is in a literal sealed system (e.g., trapped in a refrigerator). The common notion of suffocation nearly always means CO2 poisoning.
12-02-2021 at 06:12 PM
CO2 detectors (air quality monitors) are gaining popularity to gauge how likely it is that covid is accumulating in a room. If you breathe out (i.e., if you release CO2 & covid) and ventilation is inadequate, CO2 (& covid) levels will continue to rise. Experts recommend that if a CO2 monitor goes above 700 ppm (some say 800), you should ventilate the room, turn on a HEPA filter, or leave (assuming people who aren’t in your “bubble” are present). This one seems like the one I’ve seen in more than one news article (though supposedly, cheaper ones work well enough): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YY7BH2W/ . It’s portable so you can take it wherever you go.
yoga4life asked this question on 12-06-2021 at 11:15 AM
12-06-2021 at 12:08 PM
There are smoke detectors that also include carbon monoxide detection. This is not one of those devices.
12-06-2021 at 03:21 PM
Smoke detectors, no. These may pass a code inspection looking for carbon monoxide (CO) detectors if they are installed correctly, but these do not detect smoke.
cat5 asked this question on 12-02-2021 at 03:17 PM
12-02-2021 at 03:17 PM
Price went down to $11.85 each so lucky I had slow shipping and was able to cancel and rebuy
12-06-2021 at 03:25 PM
"Better" is subjective. Plug-in devices with battery backup will always be superior to battery-only devices because they are less likely to completely fail. That said, battery-only detectors have the convenience of anywhere placement, as you said. I wouldn't say it's unsafe to go the battery-only route, but you need to be diligent about putting fresh batteries in every six months, even if no low voltage warnings have occurred. Only you can know if you're the type of person who will remember to do that and follow through. If you're not (don't feel bad; I'm not), then plug-in w/battery backup is the safer choice.
T1NY asked this question on 12-01-2021 at 01:05 PM
12-03-2021 at 01:12 AM
Near your bedrooms.
12-06-2021 at 03:28 PM
Honestly, as many places as possible. In the same room as things that could potentially emit carbon monoxide (gas stove, gas water heater, garage with parked car, even a wood stove) offers earliest detection, but you may then be unable to hear the alarm if it goes off when you're sleeping or if your house is particularly large. Outside of bedroom doors increases likelihood that you'll be awoken, but also that toxic levels of CO may have been released by the time the alarm sounds. Both setups together is safest, but if you have to choose one, choose the one that sounds right for you.
PuneetN asked this question on 11-24-2021 at 01:22 PM
11-24-2021 at 10:18 PM
No, it is a 110v household plug in

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#61
Price went down to $11.85 each so lucky I had slow shipping and was able to cancel and rebuy
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#62
Quote from odbal :
Firefighter here. I just want to confirm that these answers are absolutely correct. Any house using natural gas (generally methane) or propane should have explosive gas alarm(s) in addition to carbon monoxide detectors..
Thanks for this. Got the Kidde Nighthawk Carbon Monoxide Detector & Propane, Natural, & Explosive Gas Detector you linked to for $30. That's $10 off the usual price. Lowest price at Amazon.com since 2015 per the Camel.
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#63
Should I use one of these nighthawk in my garage, close to the water heater?
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#64
It's actually showing up as $11.85 for me. Thanks for the deal, I was looking for one.
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#65
Quote from odbal :
Firefighter here. I just want to confirm that these answers are absolutely correct. Any house using natural gas (generally methane) or propane should have explosive gas alarm(s) in addition to carbon monoxide detectors. Carbon monoxide is created by partially burned fuel releasing CO instead of CO2, and its source can be anything from a faulty pilot light, to a running car in an attached garage, to burning embers in the bottom of an ash bucket next to a wood stove (which can still generate enough CO to kill). It is colorless, odorless...undetectable except by carbon monoxide detectors. Honestly, every house should have at least one CO alarm, even if there aren't any presumed sources.

Explosive gas will not trigger carbon monoxide detectors, even at high concentrations. Usually people rely on the bad smell (like rotten eggs) that is added to natural gas/propane as a warning system. However, we have seen situations where gradual accumulation prevented detection due to nose blindness. A few years ago a man and woman came home from date night and could smell natural gas in their driveway as they pulled up. Their two teenage boys were at the back of the small house (1500 sq ft) playing video games and hadn't noticed a thing. One of them had nudged a kitchen stove burner knob and it was hissing out gas, filling the house. After that, they got one of the these alarms [amazon.com] and put it in their kitchen. Tested by leaving a burner slightly on, unlit...the alarm went off in under five minutes. I have the same unit in my own kitchen.

One last important point: if you smell gas in your house, do not start opening windows to air it out. Explosive gasses are only explosive at relatively low concentrations with air. Propane is only about 10%; methane around 15%. By the time you smell it, it's possible your concentrations could be higher than that. Opening windows could pull you back into the "danger zone". Don't ventilate; evacuate. Call the fire department. We can determine the concentrations and ventilation needs, as well as speed ventilations with fans that are low-risk for causing explosions.

Remember, as a general rule (in the US at least):
• We won't charge you for our help
• You are not bothering us
• If anything, you are probably making our day more interesting
• It is good practice for us
• We are then on-hand in case anything does explode

Alright, enough rambling from me. Be safe, everyone.
Thank you for your service AND for all the helpful information! I'm going to buy 1 of each!
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#66
Quote from Colgate :
Should I use one of these nighthawk in my garage, close to the water heater?
If the water heater runs on propane or natural gas, yes, it's probably a good idea, in addition to a carbon monoxide detector. Technically, anything with a pilot light could release either carbon monoxide or explosive gas, depending on what goes wrong with the system. If the gas is burning, but only partially, you get CO. If the pilot light goes out completely, and the automatic shut off fails, you get leaking explosive gas.

My motto with alarm systems is simple: better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it.
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#67
Quote from Glee217 :
What causes explosion again? I have a gas burning stove and water heater so how can it cause an explosion? Thanks
I'm sorry, I just saw your question.

The gas itself is explosive when mixed with air in concentrations around 10-15%. When burned in a controlled way, this is great...it heats our water, our pots and pans, etc. But that "controlled way" depends on the gas burning completely to form carbon dioxide (CO2), which is the same stuff we breathe out and plants breathe in....harmless as long as it's not the only gas in a room. But if something goes wrong with the burning process, one of two dangerous gasses can be released:
  1. Carbon monoxide (CO): this happens when the gas burns incompletely (like if a stove burner or water heater pilot light malfunction). Carbon monoxide is invisible and has no smell, but will quickly suffocate and kill any oxygen-breathing creature trapped in a room with it. We use carbon monoxide detectors to detect if CO is building up in an area because we can't detect it in any other way.
  2. Explosive gas: this happens when gas begins escaping without being burned at all. Basically, a gas leak...but it doesn't always come from a leaky pipe. If a stove burner is left on without burning (just hissing), or if a hot water heater pilot light goes out and the gas doesn't auto-shut off, then explosive gas will start to build up in the room. Once the gas reaches a 10-15% mix with the air in the room, it is explosive, and a single spark can ignite the gas in the air, causing an explosion. The spark can come from almost anywhere, like inside a light switch when it's flipped, or a refrigerator's compressor turning on automatically. Now, the gas used for stoves and pilot lights does have a smell (like rotten eggs) that is added to it so we notice if it's leaking. But if the leak is slow enough, or if we are sleeping, we might not notice before explosive gas levels become dangerously high.

    Carbon monoxide detectors cannot detect pure explosive gas, and explosive gas detectors cannot detect carbon monoxide. Because gas-fueled appliances can emit either dangerous gas, it is my recommendation that owners have both alarm types.

    I hope this makes sense. Please, don't hesitate to let me know if you have more questions. I'm always happy to share knowledge.
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#68
Bought it last week from AMZ for $11.85
Guaranteed Ten Year life from date of first power on too. (1st Alert is only 7 years)
The AC plug is non-polarized & can be rotated 90-degrees.
Does not block second outlet in a typical home duplex fixture. Included 2X AA Alkaline batteries.
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#69
My downstairs one just failed and I needed to get a replacement, so perfect timing! I like the idea of the A/C plug-in w/ battery backup, so hopefully this thing holds up. Repped!
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#70
Worth noting that even if you have zero natural gas and run off pure electricity, you should STILL get one or two of these. Me and my wife bought our house in AZ and after about 1 year we accumulated enough carbon monoxide from our garage to trip the detector upstairs. Who knows where we'd be if we didn't have the detector.
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#71
Not an expert here, just a homeowner. Odbal has given us some very good advice. I would also add that if you still have any questions about type of alarms, location etc. call your fire department.

In my case when I asked for their help they came to the house (fire engine and a full crew).
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#72
Quote from odbal :
Firefighter here. I just want to confirm that these answers are absolutely correct. Any house using natural gas (generally methane) or propane should have explosive gas alarm(s) in addition to carbon monoxide detectors. Carbon monoxide is created by partially burned fuel releasing CO instead of CO2, and its source can be anything from a faulty pilot light, to a running car in an attached garage, to burning embers in the bottom of an ash bucket next to a wood stove (which can still generate enough CO to kill). It is colorless, odorless...undetectable except by carbon monoxide detectors. Honestly, every house should have at least one CO alarm, even if there aren't any presumed sources.

Explosive gas will not trigger carbon monoxide detectors, even at high concentrations. Usually people rely on the bad smell (like rotten eggs) that is added to natural gas/propane as a warning system. However, we have seen situations where gradual accumulation prevented detection due to nose blindness. A few years ago a man and woman came home from date night and could smell natural gas in their driveway as they pulled up. Their two teenage boys were at the back of the small house (1500 sq ft) playing video games and hadn't noticed a thing. One of them had nudged a kitchen stove burner knob and it was hissing out gas, filling the house. After that, they got one of the these alarms [amazon.com] and put it in their kitchen. Tested by leaving a burner slightly on, unlit...the alarm went off in under five minutes. I have the same unit in my own kitchen.

One last important point: if you smell gas in your house, do not start opening windows to air it out. Explosive gasses are only explosive at relatively low concentrations with air. Propane is only about 10%; methane around 15%. By the time you smell it, it's possible your concentrations could be higher than that. Opening windows could pull you back into the "danger zone". Don't ventilate; evacuate. Call the fire department. We can determine the concentrations and ventilation needs, as well as speed ventilations with fans that are low-risk for causing explosions.

Remember, as a general rule (in the US at least):
• We won't charge you for our help
• You are not bothering us
• If anything, you are probably making our day more interesting
• It is good practice for us
• We are then on-hand in case anything does explode

Alright, enough rambling from me. Be safe, everyone.
Thank you for this, super useful info. Just bought the Kidde explosive gas alarm. My wife and I always check our stove before going to sleep, but still sometimes get paranoid. This will help.

FWIW, since it's sold by Amazon.com, I was able to use an Amex reward point for 30% off.

We have a two story house and have a CO2 detector on each floor. Is that enough or would having 2 per floor be overkill? Downstairs is our living area plus a bedroom, upstairs is three bedrooms.
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#73
Do I need a detector for carbon dioxide as well?
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#74
Quote from giantbruin :
Thank you for this, super useful info. Just bought the Kidde explosive gas alarm. My wife and I always check our stove before going to sleep, but still sometimes get paranoid. This will help.

FWIW, since it's sold by Amazon.com, I was able to use an Amex reward point for 30% off.

We have a two story house and have a CO2 detector on each floor. Is that enough or would having 2 per floor be overkill? Downstairs is our living area plus a bedroom, upstairs is three bedrooms.
With CO detectors, I'm of the mind that there's not really any such thing as overkill, provided you're not getting false alarms (placing one very near an otherwise well-ventilated generator exhaust, for example). For that reason, I got combination fire/CO detectors to place all around my house. I know some people don't care for them because of the possibility that one could fail before the other, but that is also true of independent units bought simultaneously, so it is what it is. The best I can do is get well-reviewed devices and, if I'm feeling extra-diligent, test them myself (CO next to a car exhaust, smoke near an oudoor fire pit).

All that said, cost can definitely be a factor in the "overkill" regard. I do feel like more than two might be wise in a 2-story house. My concern would be that concentrations could already be extremely high by the time one is triggered, and depending on where you are positioned relative to the CO source and the detector, you might already be breathing it in. As I understand it, the speed and intensity at which weakness, drowsiness, and loss of consciousness come on is startling. The last thing you want is to be on the couch, hear the alarm, and then realize you can't even stand up. Or, worse, have it happen at night and never wake up at all.

Smoke detectors are placed in every room for two reasons: 1. fire can start anywhere, and 2. to maximize alerting throughout the house (especially when detectors are interconnected so they all go off if one goes off). Ostensibly, CO is far less likely to come from anywhere in a house...but it can drift anywhere, and you can never be certain what path it might take.

Prime example: earlier this year, a local business called 911 because on of their employees had a seizure. Crews came, met the employee (and helpers) in the parking lot, assessed and transported. Less than an hour later, they got called back because multiple people were getting sick. This time, they went inside, and the CO detectors they wear started going off. Turns out there was a malfunction with one of the building's boilers, and while they had CO detectors near the boiler itself, this somehow vented gas directly into the HVAC system, so it didn't build up near the boiler...it was sent directly to the workers' area.

It is my understanding that the business now has CO detectors all over the place, and many illnesses (one near-death) could have been avoided if they'd been everywhere in the first place. I don't believe the business was violating any safety regulations, nor that they didn't care, they just didn't know, you know?
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#75
Quote from ryuounce :
Do I need a detector for carbon dioxide as well?
No, nor do I think one even exists at the consumer level (maybe for specialty applications in labs or whatnot). There is CO2 all around us all the time; it's what trees breathe. In fact, the usual air we breathe is only about 21% oxygen. The only time CO2 poisoning would ever be a concern is in a literal sealed system (e.g., trapped in a refrigerator). The common notion of suffocation nearly always means CO2 poisoning.
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